Monday, May 8, 2017

He urges a Guerrilla war against corruption

Translated by Otis B Fly-Wheel for Borderland Beat from a Riodoce article

Subject Matter: Corruption in Sinaloa
Recommendation: No prior subject matter knowledge required


Reporter: Mirian Ramirez
In Mexico and Sinaloa one cannot wait any more, citizens have to initiate a Guerrilla war against corruption, emphasized Luis Manuel Perez de Acha, member of the Committee of Citizen Participation of the National System for Anti corruption.

The traditional structure of waiting for the authorities to resolve conflicts is today obsolete, before this crisis of corruption the citizens have to take control and demand that crimes be punished, said the professor during the first anti-corruption forum that took place in Sinaloa and was organized by the Coparmex business centre.

In an interview, Perez de Acha criticized the fact that the Government of Sinaloa is not aggressively pursuing the acts of corruption committed during the term of Mario Lopez Valdez, and lamented that for example, there is evidence of embezzlement in health and that this crime has not yet been punished.




"We cannot be obsessive with crimes, corruption has to be pursued and that is why both Governor Quirino, the Secretary for Finance, the State Auditor, and the Attorney General are responsible for prosecuting these crimes and also responsible for the fact that they are not being pursued", he criticized.

However, he emphasized that before this obvious omission, society cannot turn the page and forget a sexenio plagued by acts of corruption. The citizenry can go before the Office of the Attorney General of the Republic and denounce the acts of corruption that have been committed in his Government.

"As  a Society, we cannot stand with crossed arms, we have built a paradigm that is if the Government does nothing, we cannot do anything, I think what the citizens can do is to start filing criminal charges, we have to do research on the evidence, to present the denunciations . to have those complaints filed at the Federal level and to make sure they are criminal complaints, but we are going to be giving many returns on the subject", he emphasized.

In his presentation, to an audience made up mostly of businessmen and leaders of citizen organizations, Perez de Acha insisted on shielding the installation of the local anti-corruption system to prevent authority from simulating the process.

As detailed, the local anti-corruption system is built on two committees, one of them, the citizen participation committee will be composed of five citizens recognized for their work in favour of transparency and the fight against corruption.

To elect them, the Congress will appoint a Selection Committee composed of nine people, give academics and four from civil society, who will be in charge of choosing the five citizens of the Committee.

The key to everything is in the selection commission and in that we have to emphasize the congress so that the Commission is truly representative since from there it can initiate the simulation, if the congress covers up its interests through the selection committee, this cover up will be extended to the participation committee, whereby the system will be completely surrounded, captured and then will not work.

The profiles suitable for joining the participation committee should fulfill one essential characteristic, of not having commitments to the political class.

The participation committee will appoint a citizen president to chair the local committee, which will be composed of the state auditor, the anti-corruption prosecutor, the state controller, a representative of the supreme court of justice of the state, the president of the commission of state of access to information and representative of the administrative court of justice.

I think there are two lines for the profiles, one is that they are citizens who have shown an active participation in these issues and what they should not have is clearly political or economic ties and commitments with the political or ruling class.

In order for the system to operate and fulfill its objectives, the citizens committee will be the watchdog and in charge of guiding the fulfillment of the objectives, as well as liaising with civil society and academic organizations, while the local committee must evaluate public policies for combating corruption and to establish mechanisms for prevention and eradication.

As it has been pointed out, Perez de Acha agreed that Sinaloa is behind in the process of installing the local anti corruption system and before a deadline that expires next July, the time to comply with the federal mandate is insufficient.

As I understand from the data from the anti corruption semaphore, which are being carried out by IMCO and Coparmex, if there is a sufficient backlog, it is not in the best interests of the country, but it is not very far down, if we must urge that laws be approved. Governor Quirino must be urged to present the legislation for the system, as commented here in this forum, the will of the authorities will not be gratuitous or fortuitous, it has to pressure society.

Original article in Spanish at Riodoce

35 comments:

  1. OTIS, here Tamps it's out of control. Revolution is the only solution.
    People r damn tired.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Im just translating an article that may explain part of the reason it is so bad , will have it out to y'all tomorrow.

      Delete
    2. Main reasons is peso collapse and Pemex collapse!
      Mexico's economy went from bad to worse!
      Since Mexico is already a defacto criminal state, crime will and has worsened!
      I foretold this last year as the peso and Pemex began their horrific slide!
      Mexico and many Mexican companies could default with all the debt denominated in US$$$$s!
      Basically they need to collect approx. 40% more pesos, since it has been severely devalued, to pay their us denominated debt! OUch!

      Delete
    3. viva la revoluccion

      Delete
    4. I am working in US
      My dollar goes along back home

      Delete
    5. @8:18
      Nice try homey but let me help you:
      Arriba La Revolucion jijos del Cocho......

      Lil' Zapata

      Delete
    6. Default the peiso, fack it.
      Foreign investors wanted and got pemex to close operations to make it unprofitable and buy it cheap ot get paid to take it over, and even paid pooliticians to do it.
      Now that mexico has been turned into a beggar state again, let's catch some politician's nalgas to take it on.

      Delete
  2. Go after the corrup politicians & THEIR FAMILIES!

    ReplyDelete
  3. mission impossible, homes?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Society does not dare go against the Gov. or Cartels lol. If they haven't tried it yet they never will.

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  5. Sad to say unfortunately such a system will only either be tainted with elected officials who will sit on committee or killed if not in compliance with the will of the government.
    Beautiful conception of an implementation to monitor and convict those corruptible practices which Mexico is well known for.
    Moreover as to filling complaints in state and federal offices by citizens, fear of retribution is what citizens know from government. And will be discouraged to do so.
    Corruption is a complex issue within the political system which has and continues to proceed with impunity in Mexico.
    Hopefully a solution can be achieved.
    But odds are little to none that such procedures will make an impact. You cannot take bites from crime where the whole pot is compromised.
    Clearly it's evident that a new government of officials are what needs to be implemented.
    That's a true solution.

    E42

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a question for BB. Is there a reason for such logos to be acknowledged? Past and present logos are emitted and omitted from readers?
      Just curious and not of importance.
      It's just entertainment for me . And a chance to express concerns of issues.

      E42

      Delete
    2. @736 To what logos are your referring?

      Delete
  6. R.i.p these guy, specially after saying all these in sinaloa. Corruption in México is a way of life

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @6:52 am
      Sad to say but past and present practices from government/ organized criminals have demonstrated such.
      Such a shame .

      E42

      Delete
  7. It is already a war zone and the war is not being televised.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @7:34 While parts of Mexico could be classified as a war zone, as has been said here many times before all of Mexico is not a war zone. And those areas that could be considered a war zone I assure you they are not fighting a war against corruption

      Delete
    2. After being in cahoots with the government all over mexico for so many years, partnering with narcos of all sizes, laundering mo ey and investing all they could for themselves, COPARMEX, the Confederacion Patronal de la Republica Mexicana like Movimiento Ciudadano rise their loud voices, now, too late, to condemn "the government" while in 12 years of PAN rule it went from bad with Fox to worse with FECAL, because their party and government dedicated wholeheartedly to corruption and profit, robbing a they could, from Pemex to power generation, and of course, a few young "televisa actresses"
      If they are so against corruption, why don't they start by naming their party's corruption Hall of Fame candidates?
      Malova is one, Guillermo Padrés Elias is another, looks like Movimiento Ciudadano is some former panistas who did not get to benefit from their panista buddies' corruption.

      Delete
  8. I do not think their is a will in people to do it. Why would you want to leave your novelas and soccer oh I forgot lucha libre. Lots of people support their local drug lord. They'll blast your ass of to oblivion.

    ReplyDelete
  9. wheres all the michoacanos that like to talk shit todos estamos en esto no solo ustedes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. About what? That Sinaloa will never go to war against criminals? Sinaloenses would rather join the cartels. And yes cds and beltranez are as worse as any other cartel. .

      Delete
  10. After living in Mexico nearly a decade I see little distinction between government and the drug pushers. The latter at least sell you dope, the former plays you and everyone else for dopes.

    Quite successfully I might add.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can see your logic 9:49 am.
      The first legally corrupt .
      The second (Narcos ) an extension of government practices .

      E42

      Delete
  11. This dude will get nailed if not by the cartels then by their masters (a.k.a. the government)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I think a failed revolution would wake up that Mexican government

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sad to say but unfortunately a cleansing from top to bottom needs implementation. Laws to protect and prosecute individuals from within government and criminals have become a mockery to its citizens.
      The thought of many casualties for such a change is what's troubling to accept.
      Nevertheless until good governance is implemented we can only expect the same results and and outcomes of a corrupt system.
      We can only hope such changes can arise to assist its country from such travesties.
      E42

      Delete
  13. The politicians best weapon is public political apathy,they will not listen,they must be forced to listen.
    A professor,a highly educated intelligent man is advocating at the very least some kind of protest.You have people who believe that to openly go against organs of power is inherently wrong.
    A people has every right to defend themselves against crime and impunity if their elected representatives are openly abrogating its responsibilities to its people and country.
    Its plain to see politicians are contemptuous of their constituents(as in most countries)and could care less about corruption murder and kidnapping,what is the alternative for Mexico's people?Dr Mireles did some good and look what they did to him?Politicians live in a bubble of rarefied air apart from the people who put them in this bubble.Time to burst it?

    ReplyDelete
  14. This reporter has Balls!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I've never heard of this guy, and really question his legitimacy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 7:52 "this guy" is speaking about the problem of mexican government corruption, from a Patronal (employer) point of view, he sees the hand writing on the wall, and wants to create a revolution the rich mexican entrepreneurs can manage to steal from the mexicans that will win it.
      Beware of the false prophets, specially when you don't know them there was not long ago "christian" propagandist Ralph Reed whose partners worked diligently at scaring millions of dollars from Indian casino tribes and exporting religion to china.

      Delete
  16. News reports state Mexico is 2nd worst in world as a conflict nation. Syria first, Mexico coming in before Afghanistan and Iraq in terms of number of violent deaths.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Chivis or Otis need to post this... corruption at its finest...

    Liquor-drenched party in Mexican prison embarrasses government - Los Angeles Times

    https://apple.news/AU9P02VbfSsaK-10MiirwQQ

    ReplyDelete
  18. Freedom of speech?????

    ReplyDelete
  19. They just killed Javier Valdez Cardenas in culiacan he was main reporter and founder of RIO DOCE maybe because of yhis article

    ReplyDelete

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