Friday, August 26, 2011

Security video released in Monterrey casino attack

by Sergio Chapa
Valleycentral.com
KGBT




Authorities have released security camera footage taken outside a Monterrey casino where 52 died in what officials are calling an 'act of terror.'

The deadly attack happened near downtown Monterrey late Thursday afternoon.

Gunmen stormed the building and doused the casino with a flammable liquid and then ignited it.

People hiding from the gunmen in restrooms and other places died after becoming trapped by the flames or succumbing to smoke.

Mexican officials released security camera footage taken from the outside of the casino.

The suspects are seen arriving at the casino and people are recorded on tape fleeing for their lives.

The final frames of the surveillance video show flames and black smoke.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon is blaming drug traffickers and vowed to bring those responsible to justice.

Mexico's Security Secretary Alejandro Poire denounced the narco-attack as an 'act of terror.'

Officials are offering a $30 million peso reward for information leading to the arrests of those responsible.

17 comments:

  1. When I served in Iraq and Afghanistan, I used to think about how horrible the people were who were committing everday horrors. Now, I look at the things that go on everday in your country and think the same thing. After we took care of one man and his minions in Iraq, you saw the beheadings and other forms of torture diminish to almost nothing. It seems like there are people in Mexico that believe this type of violence and many other examples, are as cool as wearing a Polo shirt with the big man and horse on it. Of course I don't mean to say that the problems Mexico encounter are as simplistic as that, but there comes a point when you just have to say what the f*^k! I wonder how many serial killers, not just from the narco ilk, and child molesters/killers roam around the country killing at will. Many parts of Mexico are extremely beautiful and so are its people. I know this because I have visited the country on a handful of ocassions. When are more people going to love your country enough and band together and do something to save it? What goes on in Mexico is just pure madness!! No other country will solve what's going on there except for the people who live there. Anyone who disagrees with me, should not even bother because you will be wrong.

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  2. At 10:47, what do they do when guns are illegal? Just like they want to do to us in the US. Only the bad guys have the guns, and don't care if they go to jail If Mexico made guns legal tomorrow, these piss ants would think twice before shooting in public. Mexico will have to fix itself from the grass roots, and not from a corrupt infrastructure. Mexico is a joke now. Sad. It's got more going for it than any country on the planet, and they can't get their shit together. The most dangerous thing for a Mexican these days is other Mexicans. Arabs are pussies compared to these monsters. All for tacky cloths, fat women, and stolen SUV's.

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  3. There is talk of a secret police that is now hunting down these animals with orders to kill. Being that the judicial system is a failure, the thought ...it appears .. to simply irradicate these animals and make as little noise as possible. That goes for the wealthy who sit and live off of the wealth created by these groups.

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  4. @10:47pm

    AMEN! It's time for leaders to step up and encourage the people to defend their country instead of just turning a blind eye. I'm wondering if this was the only exit. Should'nt there have been other exits?

    But the Timid attitude that the citizens are showing just is'nt working.

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  5. Texcoco Mex said.

    @ August 26, 2011 10:47 PM I agree with you and I will like to say thank you for you military service.

    Now you better than any one knows how difficult war is. U.S has the best equipped and best trained military in the world but 10 years after the U.S is still in Afghanistan and the higher coalition casualties had happened in the last 2 years.

    Do you think it was a mistake to use the military to fight the cartels?

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  6. In response to the first comment: It is obvious that you were definitely a grunt fighting at a seargent's if not a corporal,s orders overseas. You had very little tactical control and event less strategic say in how you and your commrades fought the war over there. You fought for freedom and the US security but you didn't realize that your Generals fought with a very different goal in mind at the request of US politicians. Let me fill you in on the geopolitics that affect the direction that this war has taken so that in the future with a little reflection you might be able to post a more accurate assesment of how the Mexican population can turn the tide in this wave of violence that has affected many innocent lives.

    The US is engaging in a non traditional war by proxy in Mexico because the goal is not a stricly political one in the academic sense of the word but more a pragmatic application to the conditions with which the US must deal with at this point. The actual war in Mexico is beign fought as a result of a push-pull effect of population/economic dynamics in the western Hemisphere. Like you said, once you removed one man and his minions in Irak brutality fell to an all time low in the war. Well how about the US never allowed one man (Escobar) and his minions to ever addict so many in the US and you wouldn't have ever had the problem of insatiable demand, which is now the main problem that led to drug cartels evolving into full fleged all encompassing criminal organizations expanding into every concievable niche of criminal activity. Remember the Iran Contra affair: Don't you realize that the CIA used drug profits to promote its Cold War efforts in the Americas in the 80s?

    So later as this demand for drugs grew, the US decimated the popularity of the Carribean Corridor for Cocaine Smuggling but not the demand within its borders. Wow, Mexico is on the border, has millions crossing illegaly into the US without a problem, so why not cocaine since marihuana has been smuggled for decades. So you have about three decades of both drugs and immigrants crossing through the US Mexico border until BOOM your greedy capitalist masters-of-the-universe screw up the economy and so something must be done.

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  7. (continued from above)

    1 - Kick out the immigrants who in times of prosperity provided all the grunt work positions that the US couldn't fill with its own citizens because many of them were to busy getting high on MJ, Coke, an more recently Meth.
    2 - Maintain the government jobs at all levels to keep the economy and morale from getting worse
    3 - Help stabilize the economy by not eradicating the drug problem within US borders but merely mitigate it with enforcement so that there is an abundance of work for the justice sector ei prisons/construction, Courts/payments, Police/jobs and simultaneously an underground economy that keeps the sorst of the worst from exapnding into more desperate crimes ( like the ones Mexico os now experiencing)

    Here is the kicker: The US thinks, while because of this collapsing economy our allies might jump ship and strengthen ties with other countries which in turn would further negatively impact the US position as a Superpower why not simultaeously weaken its allies in the Americas and create a stronger bond (read dependence) with them. Clever plan.

    You might ask how does this affect Mexico. OK Mexico has an economy weaker that that of the US, an influx of repatriated Mexicans, the geopolitical threat that many digruntled Mexicans, and Central Americans, and South American lower-class humans represent, the necessary continuing influx of drugs to the US, and the readily available flow of weapons to Mexico, bought by Mexican Cartels from US buyers with money that the Mexican Cartels received from US consumers which because of the arms sales eventually end up cycling back into the US economy. No worries though becasue now the border is more secure and the shit is hitting the fan nest door but there is very little backfire. POW the US is still in control, good for you.

    Now you tell me how is a Mexican patriot gonna get a gun let alone an AK of AR15 to help eradicate something the the US helped create, when many can barely afford to buy a kilo of tortillas. How do you propose that Mexicans take back their country from cartels if the US wil not allow it and the Mexican government/elite is in cahoots with the US Superpower. Now you pass this judgement that not enough Mexicans love their coutry enough to save it? Seems to me that you are biting your own tongue when you say this because US citizens obviously don't love their own country enough eradicate the manipulaors who have made it weak and would prefer you just work your 8-10 hours and go sit afterword behind the tube and get brainwashed to conform to the US mold of a "patriot" and if not then you just prefer go buy some drugs to get high and still contribute to the US economy and the cause in general.

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  8. I think that the soldier that fought in Iraq is suggesting that Mexican patriots eliminate one man (Calderon) and his minions (gorvernment) so that the US can intervene and establish a satellite government that serves US interests first then Mexican interests second all in the name of democracy. Oops thats exactly what is happening RIGHT NOW!!! OK so the US doesnt actually need to annex Mexico and add all of its illiterate jobless and beligerent citizens to the Crippled Social Security System because that would definitely be the final nail in the coffin of an imminent US government shutdown.

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  9. @ August 27, 2011 12:16 AM. I am glad to see that you were able to surmise from the little I said about my service that I was a grunt. Actually, when I graduated college in 2002, I decided to go to OCS and become on officer in the Marines. I just left the service last year after serving 2 tours in Iraq and 1 in Afghanistan. I planned missions for men in which I had not only tactical, but stragetic control of the mission I was tasked to perform. After 9/11, I knew that once I graduated I wanted to do something for my country and to find those responsible for attacking it. Generals did not have a different goal in mind at that time: the goal was simply to find the militants and kill them! I'm not gonna get into an argument with you about what war is and how it should be fought because we probably have different ideas about that notion. What I am going to say is that in the US, we fight gangs, drug dealers, and killers everyday through our law enforcement system. There are individuals who do corrupt things and abuse their power at times. Bad apples do slip through the cracks here and there, but it seems that the majority of Mexican law enforcement is on the take! When cops take money from criminals to turn a blind eye, people die and it's that simple. Texcoco Mex, thank you for your kind words, I appreciate it. I think it was the right thing for the president to use the military because they were and are the last bastion of hope. It is the military where you find disciplined men who do not do their jobs for money and understand the risk of death is very real. They are fighting because they love your country and they will do anything to not see it destroyed by a bunch of savages, thirsty for power, wealth, and blood. Do you think such honorable men prefer wearing masks each day in a profession where they should be able to walk tall with their faces shown in honor? They can't do that because showing their faces in public will mean almost certain death for them and their families as well. This fact can be seen in numerous stories during these past years. My point is that when you have so much corruption within the government and in your police forces what else can you do? The cartels will burn the country to the ground with the same flammables they siphon from the oil company each day. It is truly a shame the citizens are not able to own firearms legally for the most part because I do believe it would be easier for honest citizens to protect themselves. I receive feeds from this and a few other websites each day that inform me about what is going on in Mexico. I am not Mexican, but what goes on there saddens me because it is not just a Mexican problem, but a human problem. The carnage going on there is just unimaginable to me and I have see a lot. I just always wait for the day when things will start to get better there. Better for honest, hopeful, civilized people. And better for hard working families and of course their children who haven't even started to live.

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  10. Anyone know what cartel did this? I don't think it matters really actually because whoever did this just fucked up majorly.

    The government will now go after those responsible seeing as its big news across the world as they know the world is now looking at them to do something so they will have to make an effort or be torn to shreds by everyone saying how they are working with the cartels.

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  11. @ 2:46am

    Ok Marine well I do concede that I was mistaken about the grunt thing if in fact what you say is true. But that then leaves the only available option about your service, in my perspective. Since you are capable of figuring out the tactics and strategies of this war and how the US fits into this ordeal (being that you are an officer and have a certain level of intellegence clearance)you do not contest my assesment for the simple reason that you know both sides of the argument and you know its useless to argue being that you must necessarily take the patriotic US stance.

    The fact remains that this is not only a problem for Mexicans but one in which the US had a direct influence, and consequently equaly to blame. If you cannot concede this point then any discussion with you is useless. This is what it boils down to. You are engaging in ignorance the way in which you textually wash your hands of responsibility by asserting that Mexicans don't love their country enough to correct a problem were armed force is the key issue holding them back from banding themselves together to save it. Thats like saying that Jews didn't love their lives enough to save themselves in face of Nazi Germany. See, aside from the idealogical overtones of the holocaust, the Nazis had the guns and the Jews didn't.

    Now how can this be resolved in the case of the Mexican Drug War? You are right Mexicans cannot legally own big guns. What do you suggest, US invasion, UN intervention, New Constition? That still leaves Mexicans fucked because, unlike the US, Mexico is actually a third world country in which the elite hold power and use that power to maintain their top-of-the-pyramid economic status. Upward mobility in Mexico very esclusive: unless you are willing to engage in Mexico's particular cultural idiosyncracies,one of which unfortunately involve a heavy dose of corruption, you will not move up the ladder. That being said, the US as a matter of strategy must support this and any other ruling authority that brings "order" to such a close powder keg which is what Mexico represents to the US.

    So in conclusion Mexico is the headache that will never go away, with violently predictable aftershocks the results of European Colonization. All you can do is take a pill and wait for the headache to go away and pray that it doesn't return for another hundred years.

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  12. I said it a thousand times.......below is how you win the war in Mexico against the cartel.

    1. Engage the entire army...tanks, special forces, drones, etc.
    Let citizens have weapons.
    3. Death penalty for drug traffickers, murders, crooked cops and politicians.

    This is a war and in a war you use all resources. I am sure the USA would gladly fly drones over Mexico and listen in on the drug cartel.....hellfire here we come narco traffickers. Boom... now go to hell where you belong.

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  13. The US already is flying drones over Mexico, providing intel and backup support for Mexican police law enforcement agencies/armed forces on certain specified missions against the drug cartels. They will continue to help with intel and be available to work with Mexico into the future as needed without breaking Mexico's sovereignty laws . This was in NYT 8/26/11.

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  14. @August 27, 2011 11:42 AM

    It's been long ago here in BB too (November 17, 2010):
    http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2010/11/us-espionage-center-revealed-in-mexico.html

    August 9, 2011:
    http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2011/08/mexico-acknowledges-us-intel-agents.html


    That's good and nice it's continuing. Mexico needs all help what they can get. There's too many politicians etc involved one way or another that task is huge.

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  15. I resent the condecention toward "grunts". I am a grunt and am way too smart to pick apart your wordy solutions. You write a lot but say very little. Keep comments shorter than the story whenever possible.

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  16. Texcoco Mex said

    5 people involved on the casino attack were arrested

    Carrazco Lucio Carlos Espinoza, alias "El Chigua", 25, Javier Alonso Morales Martínez, alias "El Javo", 37, Jonathan Jahir Reyna Gutierrez , 18, Juan Angel Flores Leal, alias "The Fields", 20, and Julio Tadeo Berrones, alias "El Julio Reyes' 28.

    At the press conference, the Attorney Adrian de la Garza, presented a video which shows the group of people getting gasoline in fuel containers at a gas station minutes before perpetrating the attack.

    It also appears that the Equinox gray van seen in the video of the attack was found.

    The recording also showed that the group of vehicles, including a Minicooper and Optra, move through Gonzalitos Avenue, heading to the casino.

    The president said the motive for the attack would have been to pressed the establishment to pay a fee, which is known as derecho the piso or tax.

    Presumably there was a disagreement with the owners and thats why it was attacked, but this is still under investigation, said Medina.

    He said that apparently the attack was against the business and not against the population, but the criminals were out of control.

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