Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Gunmen Kill 3 Police Officers in Northern Mexico

Monterrey – A group of around 20 men armed with assault rifles attacked city hall and the police headquarters in Los Herreras, a city in the northern Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, city officials said Tuesday.

The attack occurred Monday night just after 11:30 p.m. in the rural city, located more than 110 kilometers (68 miles) northeast of Monterrey, the capital of Nuevo Leon.

Initial reports are that the gunmen, who were wearing uniforms and arrived in several SUVs, opened fire with AR-15s on city hall, where police headquarters is also located.

The gunmen then went inside and killed the three officers on duty.

The dead officers were identified as Miguel Angel Torres, Eusebio Muñiz and Andres Ayala.

Investigators found nearly 100 bullet casings from .223-caliber weapons outside city hall.

The gunmen abandoned a late-model vehicle that had been reported stolen recently.

The vehicle’s windows bore the acronym “Z 40,” the nickname of Miguel Angel Treviño Morales, the head of the Los Zetas cartel in Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon and Coahuila states.

The rural area where Los Herreras is located is near the border with Tamaulipas and has been the scene of several killings of police officers and shootouts between the army and drug traffickers.


Nuevo Leon and neighboring Tamaulipas have been rocked by a wave of violence unleashed by drug traffickers battling for control of smuggling routes into the United States.

The violence has intensified in the two border states since the appearance in February in Monterrey of giant banners heralding an alliance of the Gulf, Sinaloa and La Familia Michoacana drug cartels against Los Zetas, a band of Mexican special forces deserters turned hired guns.

After several years as the armed wing of the Gulf cartel, Los Zetas went into the drug business on their own account and now control several lucrative territories.

The cartels arrayed against Los Zetas blame the group’s involvement in kidnappings, armed robbery and extortion for discrediting “true drug traffickers” in the eyes of ordinary Mexicans willing to tolerate the illicit trade as long as the gangs stuck to their own unwritten rule against harming innocents.

Some 5,004 people, or an average of nearly 29 per day, have died in drug-related violence in Mexico this year, the Excelsior newspaper reported Tuesday.

12 comments:

  1. the drug war has turned into a civil war, time for Mexico to ask for military help from uncle sam

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  2. These rats hide in the dark, they have no courage to face their opponents without the leverage of number and guns. They will never have the nerve to face an equally equipped opponent.

    The rising violence has taken the "Friendship" out of Mexico.. no one trusts no one any more.

    There's a lot of rookies joining them and being killed in a couple of days. (El Porvenir printed an article about two youngsters missing for two days facing the Mexican Armed Forces and loosing their lives.. ZZZ wanabee)

    Not all that shines is gold; but some still fall on the hope of fame and fortune......

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  3. Watch the Two Escobars and you'll see that Mexico is turning into the Columbia of the 80 & 90's. How sad.

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  4. All the gunmen are bloody evils. They just turn up, shoot people and make a fast exit. Maybe there's going to be a world war 3 in Mexico. They have powerful weapons, plenty of cash and drugs to smuggle. They also have powerful drug lord kingpins - I'd say they're very intelligent and smart a$$e$

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  5. This is NO CIVIL WAR! The Mexican people have turned a blind eye to the Cartels for a hundred years. Even now, that the "Chickens have come HOME to roost", the CIVILIANS are NOT fighting against anything.They continue to demand that Americans (The same people they didn't care about as regards the consumption end of the drug trade AND BLAME 100% FOR ALL THEIR TROUBLE), rescue their devastated country physically AND monetarily . NOPE! NO CIVIL WAR .

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  6. Jose Luis GonzalezJune 28, 2010 at 8:24 PM

    My parents were born in Los Herreras, Nuevo Leon. They hate what happened and the sad thing is that there is absolutely no one to blame! If The States didnt have that much demand for the drugs they wouldnt risk transporting them and killing for the financial gain.

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  7. Mexico has a major drug problem ..it is not all the mota y otra drogas viete a USA...lots of people in mexico take drugs as well....in the bars in the parks in the streets, in the resorts...wake up Mexico you have a drug problem...not just USA

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  8. it is all the fault of mexico that america has a drug problem , if mexico had not turned the blind eye to corruption and smuggling , and not glorified the cultura way back ago, then america would not have got hooked so easy...stop blaming USA for all the problems in mexico

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  9. People do drugs in the world, as well as the use of cigs and alochols.

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  10. Hojala k esten bien totos alla y m as el barrio de los gatos

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  11. RE: @ Jose Gonzales.
    You state that there is ABSOLUTELY no one to blame but then, in your next sentence you DEFAULT to the mexican motto, BLAME the U.S. As usual.
    Interesting, when even a low level drug dealer "Hooks" someone , both parties share in the responsibility of the resulting tragedy . HOWEVER, the first and major evil was the manufacture of the substance in the first place. To profit from the misery and vulnerability of others. NOT the miserable condition of the sick person whom may stupidly, turn to drugs thinking they will effectively numb their pain.
    Americans too, are subjects of a corrupt government out of control that has managed to erode any support for family values and family life. The U.S. Govt is just a bit better at disguising it. The people here are frustrated that they have no REAL chance to affect the preservation of the American PEOPLES values. Although, many of us AT LEAST TRY as a society and as parents to ACTIVELY "hold to the fire" the feet of our Govt. and children to do the RIGHT thing and NOT turn a blind eye to evil. It is a fact that Mexican citizens have routinely turned a blind eye , as long as, the cartel infiltration into their Govt. does not affect them TOO PERSONALLY. NOW that it so sadly, DOES affect them TRAGICALLY, blame the U.S.?!
    Give me a break!

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  12. Both sides are responsible. But not Mexico and US, instead, we should accept that the individuals buying and selling are responsible for what is happening. Here, escape is the reason for the demand, and there, hunger is the reason for the supply. Mexicans are not only hungry due to the lack of government support. Many states' economy in Mexico depend on the production of drugs. And many people will get killed if they refuse to participate in organized crime.
    So, shouldn't we just start looking at the root of the problem, start doing something aboutit, and stop blaming each other.
    Habla una Herrerense.

    ReplyDelete

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