Blog dedicated to reporting on Mexican drug cartels
on the border line between the US and Mexico
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Sunday, July 10, 2022

Crystal Meth Addict Interview - Sara

"Sol Prendido" for Borderland Beat

Soft White Underbelly interview and portrait of Sara, a crystal meth addict on Skid Row.


soft white underbelly

32 comments:

  1. The story is always the same. Untreated trauma (in this case lots of it), add stress, gets exposed to alcohol and drugs, tries them, numbs things and feels better, tries other things and gets addicted, loses everything.

    Treatment never works unless they are ready to quit. If they are blackmailed/prodded/threatened with jail/encouraged and they agree to rehab to get people off their back or avoid jail, treatment won't be successful and it's money down the drain.

    Meth is hardest to quit of any drug. If someone really does want to quit, guaranteed they are going to relapse at least once, probably more, and even if they want to quit, often they can't. Pure evil. I worked in a very rich area which had little crime at the beginning of my career, and by the end, meth and heroin/fentanyl were EVERYWHERE, with daddy's little girl the homecoming queen living in a mansion shooting up with oblivious parents in the other room.

    I'm retired law enforcement, and I've had so many suspects tell me in tears (after they've been arrested and I don't need anything from them) that meth turned them into someone they hated and made them do things they never dreamed of doing (theft, prostitution, counterfeiting, abusive relationships, etc.). You could tell so many of them were good people making horrible choices because of their addiction.

    The cartels are only supplying what their customers want. If it's not meth, they'll numb themselves in other ways, alcohol and weed serve the same purpose and they're legal. My problem with the cartels is the violence, and I don't have anything against users until they begin committing crimes or harming others.

    You want to greatly diminish drug use in the USA? Take the vast majority of money spent on enforcement and spend it on mental health and addiction treatment. I didn't feel this way before I got into law enforcement and experienced addicts and severe mental illness first hand. The money spent on treatment will be far more effective in reducing demand, and in turn, related crime, than the current spending on drug enforcement.

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    1. Generally, Opiates are the toughest to quit.

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    2. Maybe you’re right but what they really need to do is send these addicts and the drug dealers/traffickers and social media influencers to concentration/death camps.

      Notice how society is negatively influenced by that “party you only live once life style” from tattoos, piercings, plastic surgery, showing off material wealth which most can’t afford or bought with credit, the music rap/hip hop or narco coridos, prostitution slanging their culos on offer up and only fans etc.

      Make death camps great again!

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    3. I agree, mental health is the real gateway to addiction. More needs to be done in that regard.

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    4. 455 and everyone "a fish rots from the head down" simple saying but the honest truth no excuse period

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    5. I would have to agree with 455 pm about meth being the hardest to quit. Also the one that leaves you the most messed up physically wise. The deteriorating issues with loss of calcium and other nutrients that not only help the body run normal. But also ruins the physical look of it. Not to mention the crazy things that a person will start to do i guess due to the rewiring of the Neuro pathways. I've known people that take crystal and end up having this demonic temper when not taking it or coming down from it.

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    6. “Meth is hardest to quit of any drug.“

      Uh no. Stimulants are always the easiest to quit. And no I’m not talking about because of the withdrawal compared to other drugs. It’s multiple factors. Meth may not be the easiest to quit but it’s certainly not the hardest. I’m not even particularly convinced that even opiates are the hardest.

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    7. @5:33 “what they really need to do is send these addicts and the drug dealers/traffickers and social media influencers to concentration/death camps.”

      I think you mean Iboga retreats.

      Also what makes a difference between functional caffeine addicts and functional amphetamine addicts? Either way you kinda lost me at the tattoo/piercings part and that’s coming from someone who would never get a tattoo.

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    8. Meth is easier to quit because there's no physical withdrawal. Opiates are harder to quit because they're both physically and psychologically addictive. I've worked as substance abuse counselor for years and every addict I've come across is 100% in agreement: Opiates are the hardest to quit.

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    9. At 533pm. Although that sounds plausible to send these individuals to camps etc. Not every person that's a so called "influencer" is following the trend of the other individuals who are creating these illusions about life etc.

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    10. @9:52PM
      What are you talking about? Tattoos and piercings make people look like tweakers. It’s hard to take someone serious when you see them graffitied up like a box 🚂 train.

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  2. Replies
    1. 4:55, I am raised born in USA, and appreciate your outlook of addiction with an intelligent understanding of the situation. But what’s your thoughts on the migrants, immigrants who don’t have any choice, but to work for whoever, when they are forced to either be a scout, dealer sicario? Some or most, I don’t know the exact number of people that are outside the US that either have to do what they are told to do, or watch their loved ones suffer an unimaginable death. What would you do if you lived a mile in someone else’s moccasins? I’m a former addict that was a pretty good, not great football player in high school and college, but would hold my own and more in Powerlifting. Back in the early 2000’s, I was fed so many Oxy’s, hydrocone and Xanax due to 3 herniated discs in my back. (Now it’s five disks, degenerative disk disease and arthritis.) In 2010, the pain clinics were forced to close, and all of a sudden, I was going through hell. Uncontrollable tossing and turning every minute that I could remember, diarrhea so bad that My ass was raw, wanted to die, slept for 3 days, only to not sleep for 3 months. Wouldn’t you try to get feeling better any way possible? Fuck the Drug War, it’s time to legalize everything. Wouldn’t that reduce the Narco War deaths? The good old US of A claims that it’s a free country, and citizens have a right to choose for themselves. Isn’t that what freedom is all about? If drugs were legal, there would be less overdoses because people would be able to snort, smok or inject pure coke, not tainted with fentanyl, and would save millions of lives in mMexico and beyond from being arrested, kidnapped, murdered or disappeared, and knowing that the US are doing what they think they are buying.

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    2. Regarding the people forced to work for the cartels....that's a very difficult situation which stems from the corruption in every level of Mexican government, but especially law enforcement. If you had more effective and honest law enforcement the cartel situation would have never gotten to where it is today, and you wouldn't have as much of a problem regarding people having no other choice.

      AMLO is a joke with "hugs not bullets", and has compromised Mexico's safety for many years to come. Our family had a home in Mexico for decades, still have many friends there, glad we sold recently as things are headed into the lawlessness shitter fast. Always felt safe where we were until right before we sold, now the town is unsafe and the subject of much press lately as the cartels fight.

      Regarding people who can't get pain meds due to the ridiculous paranoia regarding prescribing opioids to people who need them so they turn to heroin/fentanyl/etc for relief, you're preaching to the choir. I've had this discussion with several doctors, flat out told them they are contributing to people seeking more dangerous and unpredictable substances for relief. I've had a spinal fusion and multi-level laminectomy, need both shoulders and one knee replaced, so, yeah, pain is my constant companion and I can't get so much as 30 pain pills to carry me for 6 months for bad days. The current reluctance to prescribe opioids is contributing to the consumption of illegal substances. Better to prescribe and monitor usage with good computerized monitoring than to withhold. Had I not handled so many fatal overdoses during my career, I might be tempted to go the illegal route myself. Meditation helps the pain.

      I don't think everything should be legalized by a long shot. Drugs are, for all intents and purposes, legal on Skid Row in Los Angeles, and look where's it's gotten LA. I don't think end users should be jailed, but I have no sympathy for dealers and they should get prison.

      Sorry for rambling a bit but hopefully this clarifies my feelings on things for you.

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    3. Great response 7:16! You’re correct on not legalizing all drugs. Anything that is grown naturally is good for me. Any synthetic man made drugs cause a lot of damage to the addict, and anyone who cares/cared about them. Damn, meth and fentanyl has destroyed so many lives.

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    4. 7:16 I too agree very minimal is being done for it's citizens. Which need to carry guns to defend themselves.
      What's funny in May Amlo ordered drug lab busts, in June more were carried me the Marina's. Why all of the sudden, is it voting time nope, turns out that he wants the millions USA gives yearly to continue to come, and also he will be meeting up, with the US president tomorrow Tuesday No wonder drug labs were being busted for show.

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  3. Why her? Should’ve interviewed one of the hundreds of thousands michoaratas meth addicts in socal

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    1. Been to Michoacán plenty of times. Didn’t see anything like that there. Most drug addicted Mexicans are close to the border or in the northern states. Been following this site for years and from my own research Sinaloa is the main trafficker and user of fentanyl and meth even with Michoacán getting all the precursors through Lazaro Cardenas port and Michoacán has the best meth cooks or at least use to.

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    2. Lookihere 7:16 you are right that drugs should be regulated dispensed administrated by federal government, instead it would be cheaper and safer too, but criticizing abrazos no balazos is not the way, because the past governments had a policy of balazos for their "enemies" and abrazos for their "friends" that created the present problems, why?
      In the past, friends and enemies included law enforcement allied with criminals Big and Small, their bitter battles degenerated in HATE that keeps crime going and their mutual murdering and CONTINUED INVOLVEMENT OF CORRUPT POLICE AND MELITARY, with much of that police grandfathered from Genarco Garcia Luna and his many minions doing Private Public Security business on every mexican state...
      The continued .murdering and increased addiction all over México is a result of wars ON drugs covering up for the War For The drug trading benefits that have also a lot of money for US Weapons traffickers.
      EPN and FECAL had Abrazos for their criminal godfellas and accomplices, and Balazos, prison, staged arrests, Falsos Positivos, persecutions, dead and disappeared on their orders or their minions'...
      Have this present next time you blame AMLO.

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    3. This is the retired police officer from 4:55 and 7:16.

      My belief that meth is the hardest to quit is based upon personal observances/interactions throughout my career. I spoke with many people who had overcome addictions to heroin/fentanyl/opioids, but *very few* who were able to kick meth. Yes, physical withdrawal for meth is mild and is very bad for the opioids/opiates. Yet the mental addiction is far worse for meth, it destroys lives and health much more thoroughly, makes people do unimaginable things and usually never lets go. Ask anybody who has done a search warrant on a meth addict's house vs. a heroin addict's house, and they will all tell you meth is far more destructive for people's lives (and the lives of those who love and depend on them).

      SIR....For awhile things in Mexico seemed like things were getting much better. Growing middle class, crime getting better, investment...all good. Started getting worse before AMLO, but with AMLO, the cartels have been emboldened and have basically taken over all levels of government with relative impunity for violent acts. The descent into lawlessness under AMLO has accelerated far and beyond prior administrations, and it's because he cartels realized there wasn't any downside to becoming more brazen. Prior to AMLO, we felt very safe in public at our home town in Mexico. Now the sicarios have been very active, including attacks on the PD headquarters and assassinations of high level local officials. The violence and lawlessness is gonna kill investment and tourism in the area, which is a huge driver for the state's economy, because the general perception is there is no consistent law enforcement and the cartels act with impunity. Who wants to visit or live in a place where they feel unsafe? What corporations are going to invest in businesses when they know the cartels are going to want a cut, and if you don't pay, you or your family will be killed? It's like the whole government has given up.

      As an aside, when we would visit the Cancun area (that wasn't where our home was), we felt safe....until our last visit in 2019, when you couldn't walk more than 30 yards on the main drag in Playa del Carmen without being approached by someone offering to sell us coke. Then the shootouts on the beach, the attacks on restaurants in Tulum (both killing or wounding innocent foreign tourists),

      As someone else said, the fish rots from the head down, and that fish head is AMLO.

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    4. 11:46 AMLO needs to be impeached.
      He is the puppet of the cartels.

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  4. When will they do an interview with El Zombie, he is addicted to the big M.

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    1. He is too Jiberish, talks nonsense.

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    2. No intervews granted to lesser men, you are lucky to have a few comments to read, it is a pity your education is soo lacking...
      you won't get to crucify me again, heheheheee!!!

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  5. Meth is available in other countries as well but its only a problem in the US.

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    1. Never been in Eastern Europe I guess?

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    2. been there, not a problem.

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  6. Do you do what you want just don't affect others. My city was full of tweakers bt to be honest the pill heads (fentanyl) are much worse and dirty af

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  7. SALINAS KALI4RNIAJuly 11, 2022 at 2:42 AM

    YOUR TYPIKAL KRAKIE STORY 🤷🏿‍♂️🤷🏿‍♂️🤷🏿‍♂️🤷🏿‍♂️ SAD BUT IT'S ALL REAL

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  8. Sad. Such a sad sad world.

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  9. Stimulant's are easiest to quit, toughest by far is opiates.

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  10. the humans problem is listening to the lies of the devil. we seek validation from another human being that is just as sinful and wretched as us. when what we should be doing is seeking God. He is the only one Who has the power to heal us and truly love us for who we are, only He can restore and renew our past present and future. makes me so sad how lost we all are. we create our own anxieties

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