Thursday, January 9, 2020

CDG: Jorge Costilla-Sanchez aka 'El Coss' pleads guilty for the second time in Texas Federal Court

Chivis Martinez Borderland Beat   DOJ Press Release

He pleaded guilty in 2017 to a separate conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and marijuana, plus two counts of assault to a federal officer. The DOJ said he has not been sentenced for those offenses.


Thursday, January 9, 2020

Former Gulf Cartel Leader Convicted of International Drug Trafficking Conspiracy

Jorge Costilla-Sanchez pleaded guilty to an international drug trafficking conspiracy to distribute cocaine and marijuana into the United States.

Costilla-Sanchez, 48, was an active member of the “Cartel Del Golfo” (CDG or Gulf Cartel). CDG is a violent Mexican criminal organization engaged in the manufacture, distribution, and importation of ton quantities of cocaine and marijuana into the United States. In the late 1990s, the Gulf Cartel recruited an elite group of former Mexican military personnel to join their ranks as security and enforcers who became known as Los Zetas. The Gulf Cartel and Los Zetas operated under the name of “The Company.” Costilla-Sanchez became the leader of The Company for several years following the arrest of Osiel Cardenas in 2003 and before Costilla-Sanchez’s arrest in September 2012.


During his association with The Company, Costilla-Sanchez was responsible for overseeing all operations and providing leadership that resulted in the importation of thousands of kilograms of cocaine and marijuana into the United States. Under Costilla-Sanchez’s leadership, The Company controlled numerous plazas along the United States and Mexico border including Matamoros, Rio Bravo, Reynosa, Miguel Aleman and Nuevo Laredo. Costilla-Sanchez used these strategically important locations to distribute cocaine and marijuana into the United States and to return bulk U.S. currency to himself and other members of CDG in Mexico.

During the course of his involvement in the conspiracy, law enforcement in Mexico and Panama seized ton quantities of cocaine that were intended for Costilla-Sanchez and other members of CDG to distribute in Mexico and the United States. Specifically, on Oct. 5, 2007, Mexican law enforcement seized 11,700 kilograms of cocaine from a warehouse in Tampico, Mexico, and on Nov. 30, 2007, the Panamanian National Police seized approximately 2,400 kilograms of cocaine in Colon, Panama.

The Defendant oversaw a vast network of other individuals including local plaza bosses, drug couriers, security personnel, scouts, hitmen and others to facilitate The Company’s drug trafficking operations.  In the performance of his duties for The Company, the Defendant and others under his charge possessed and used dangerous weapons, including firearms. Further, the Defendant organized, directed, and carried out numerous acts of violence against rival drug trafficking groups, Mexican law enforcement and others who The Company perceived as threats to their drug trafficking activities.

During his guilty plea today, Costilla-Sanchez acknowledged his participation in a conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute over 450 kilograms of cocaine and over 90,000 kilograms of marijuana.

Costilla-Sanchez’s sentencing has been set for April 14, 2020, before U.S. District Judge Fernando Rodriguez Jr. At that time Costilla-Sanchez faces a minimum of 10 years and up to life in federal prison.

The Drug Enforcement Administration - Houston Field Division conducted the investigation.   

Trial Attorneys Cole Radovich and Kirk Handrich of the Criminal Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section prosecuted this case, with significant assistance provided by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jody Young of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Texas and the Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs and Office of Enforcement Operations.

35 comments:

  1. One of my fave narco photos, Coss is standing there looking 👀apprehensive as all hell, holding his bag of chonies

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't know a whole lot about this cat. Did he have a reputation for extreme violence?

      Delete
    2. Thanks for the update Chivis. You right about this photo, Coss looks mad apprehensive almost like a caricature of his former hustling and murdering self.

      See ya at the ADX! Naw jk I won’t be there. I don’t kill people for a living. Some mota may have changed hands back in the day but that’s neither here nor there. Stay in school!

      Delete
    3. You gave me my first smile of the day....

      Delete
    4. Dam! Wht a lucky guy. Ima start saying something like that to make you smile chivis

      Delete
    5. Like a little boy caught with his hands in the cookie jar...

      Delete
    6. First smile of the day?? Quite an honor señora. You have been providing me (us) with relevant news, keeping us informed for years. Now I am smiling 🙂. Damn... it’s contagious! Haha

      Cheers!

      Frank from Canada

      Delete
  2. I hope he'll get life!!! Ugly face lol

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yea altiplano aint no joke,i knoe guys there,says it aint no walk in the park there

    ReplyDelete
  4. What faction did el coss command?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The whole cartel he was supreme boss after Tony Tormentas death.

      Delete
    2. But after osiel got locked he left the power to which brother?

      Delete
    3. Costila was a police officer (no remember federal or state) who sold out to the cartel, used his badge to get the upper hand in the cartel until they got him in the big house, left Judas and lazca the whole shebang, but separate from CDG.

      Delete
  5. Chivis, he probably has your granny panties in that bag,,i doubt theyre thongs😩🤣

    ReplyDelete
  6. Chivis is the assault charge for the two feds Osiel threatened with cuernos?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. Juan Carlos de la Cruz Reyna was the first Gulf Cartel member convicted for the 1999 assault/standoff in Matamoros. Below is the incident's Wikipedia page:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_Matamoros_standoff

      Delete
  7. Its funny how these dudes have the machismo persona. People are terrified of them and theyre scared of a 6 x 8 in USA. Deep down inside i think they had a complex the whole time

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's the uncertainty of the time/decades of the prison sentence they will receive. It's not like a DUI, Domestic Violence, Vandalism, Fraud, Public Intoxication or other super hardcore crimes that get you MONTHS in county jail!!

      Delete
    2. Wouldn't call Vincentillo, twins ect, lifetime sentences. Moreover, that of Garcia Lunas lenient pending sentencing. Nevertheless, do agree with the uncertainty of being in a foreign country than ones own country.

      War on drugs is bullshit.
      Just got back from overseas. Along with a stay in Mexico for a long weekend. Meeting with interesting people who put a true perspective on how things operate & work. Let's just say, it's mind blowing.

      E42

      Delete
  8. Chivis first off Love your Hard Work and Dedication to keeping us informed
    I have a question....Why is it that everytime somebody big is Charged it's Always Coke and Weed but Nobody ever seems to be Charged in these Big Cases for Heroin??
    It seems like it is rarely ever mentioned for some reason.
    Heroin is an Insidious Drug I was Addicted for a Number of years and struggle everyday for the Last 9 years to battle and stay clean as I know 1 taste and I would become a Disgrace yet again.
    So I know the Damage it causes first Hand so I don't understand why they never charge them for it instead it's always Coke and Weed.....So why do you think this is??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Damn good question Aussie....! maybe someone can weigh in.

      BTW hate what is happening in AU. and the animals! 500k killed. I just learned that Au has an almost all volunteer fire fighting force.

      Unpaid force....incredible.

      Delete
    2. Heroin was not In play when the CDG WAS CHARTERED, heroin was back when the war for weapons of mass distraction led to the afghani drug lords 5ook sdvantage.of US forces there to get protection from tight panty Taliban who do not approve of drugs or trafficking...Mexico is only producing some heroin to get all the blame...
      The Taliban had famously put heroin out of business for good, only US protected traffickers were keeping it going, now it is producing again, about 90% of the world supply...Colombia with 7 US military bases and countless other details is still the world's biggest cocaine staging area...some of it goes to Mexico...

      Delete
  9. They all have those days when they thrive, and those days when it all crashes down on them (some sooner than others). If people didn’t use, we wouldn’t have these problems. Yeah, I know. It’s a total pipe dream.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Yep time to pay the Piper, prison time for Papa.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Honestly if it wasn't for him zetas and golfos would probably still be one cartel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes and no. If Osiel had never been arrested, the Gulf/Zetas would probably still be one cartel too. So many variables.

      Delete
    2. M3 commander of the metros In Reynosa started the war. He killed a close associate of 40. El coss just backed him up

      Delete
  12. Looking like a punk bxtch without his thugs and guns.

    ReplyDelete
  13. They look macho but they don’t have the balls to kill themselves when they get caught by the eu.
    Knowing their life’s are done anyways.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's EUA not EU.

      Delete
    2. 5:27 estados undies (eu) is same as US instead of USA...
      SOME EVEN USE EEUU FOR PLURAL ESTADOS UNIDOS.
      I use USSA, for the socialist.

      Delete
  14. These so call tough guys, realize the parties r over, now locked up for life. Dumbasses, I rather just and have a good life, I came from Mexico, became a citizen, got a good job, rise a family, I love The U.S. Mexico is horrible.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Jajaja la cara de pendejo

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com