Monday, December 2, 2019

Michoacán: Illegally Cut Trees in the Monarch Butterfly Reserve

Yaqui for Borderland Beat from: PrimerPlaneta
Illegally chopped wood seized in Monarch Butterfly Forests:

Zitácuaro, Michoacán: Elements of the National Guard seized 26.41 cubic meters of pinewood in a forest surveillance operation to combat illegal logging and smuggling in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve.

The assurance was carried out on the Toluca - Morelia highway, in the municipality of Zitácuaro, Michoacán, where they detected a vehicle that transported wood in pine logs, in a green physical state, indicating their recent cut.

The driver tried to prove the legal origin through a forest referral with inconsistencies in its filings. The cut volume is comparable to more than 10 trees cut illegally.

For not respecting forest regulation, and based on Article 170, section II, of the General Law of Ecological Equilibrium and Environmental Protection, the precautionary assurance of the vehicle and transported wood was imposed as a safety measure.
This 3 Hectare parcel which was illegally logged was discovered in May of this year inside the Monarch Biosphere Reserve. They are often then planted with avocado trees, aka Oro Verde, if not discovered. A backhoe was found in here also.

The responsible driver may be entitled to a fine ranging from 100 to 20,000 times the current Unit of Measurement and Update (UMA), equivalent to eight thousand 449 pesos and one million 689 thousand 800 pesos, respectively, in accordance with article 157, Section II of the General Law on Sustainable Forest Development, in addition to the confiscation of forest products, equipment and tools used in the commission of the wrongful act.
              Deforestation is the prime cause of the magnificent butterfly's decline in numbers
You CAN help: Plant a Butterfly Bush! or 2 or 3, Buddleya, ie, there are at least 5 colorful varieties 
                                                                    It works !

18 comments:

  1. What kind of tree or where can we get one here in the USA what’s the name of it? Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Buddleia.......butterfly bush........." deciduous semi evergreen or evergreen shrub" depending on where you are. Lilac like blossoms, but comes in at least five varieties, actually quite easy to root from young tender cuttings.
      I have a few that have volunteered. Need to be dead headed to keep them blooming and cut back in winter if there is snow, their slighty tender long branches will break, however ,they get woodier the older they are. ( or early spring after they break :) they don't mind , extremely hardy !
      great attractors of bees and hummers too, at least here in the WEST, available in spring at most nurseries or even Home Depot garden depts.

      Delete
  2. The towns all over michoacan are planting avocado trees everywhere, green gold..
    Sucks how that monarch area is getting deforestation though. It's protected but mexican authorities sell OUT for a dollar bill..

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yaqui: Thanks for the article and also for your suggestions. In the Spring, would you trigger us to plant the buddleia for the butterflies, bees, and humming birds? I live in a kind of remote semi-arid area where I think the plant will thrive.

    About Mexico: It seems that Mexicans are bound and determined to destroy their tourism industry. More and more, I hear people who speak of Mexico in negative terms....IMO, Acapulco is an example of what other vacation venues are headed to.

    P.S. I know a lady who had to leave Puerto Vallarta after 20 years in business there. She was almost in tears telling of all the great friends and other assets she "had to" leave behind. She did not offer specifics, but strongly indicated that corruption and violence were big factors.
    Mexico-Watcher

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Puerto Vallarta? Isn't that not only one of the safest places in Mexico but one of the safest places in ft he world. I know people who have business there. They are from Juárez so I guess most places are better and safer lol...

      Delete
    2. @4:22 Remote semi- arid ? Perfect, drought tolerant also.
      Of course, they are not quite as lush as in more humid climates but YES !
      Go for it and other bee / bird/ butterfly attractors too ! Bees are in a terrible state and we need pollinators. Bats are fabulous, they eat those bad mosquitos.

      Delete
    3. @9:08 News is hard to come by from PV....feel free to share.
      I think that they just try and keep the wraps on it there because its the rich kids playground......don't kid yourself , there is plenty going down there too.

      Delete
  4. Not even butterflies safe in mexico lately

    ReplyDelete
  5. When there is no respect for human life, there is no respect for nature. Just recently, USCG intercepted pangas loaded with red snapper illegally fishing in the state waters of Texas. It's now a common occurrence. They trash and deplete their own resources, and now, steal ours. They need to be treated like poachers in Africa and shot on sight.
    At least, sink their craft and let them swim home through waters containing the sharks they have finned.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The native Americans should've treated your ancestors the same way. Your ancestors mass murdered the natives, stole their land, put them on reservations, slaughtered the buffalo and introduced foreign plant and animal species and infected them with disease.

      Delete
    2. You seem to think that the indigenous peoples lived in harmony with each other during the pre-columbian era. Nothing is further from the truth. They battled each other, conquered other tribes, kidnapped women and children, and relished in torture techniques designed to inflict pain and prolong the suffering of their enemies. The history of humankind is one of movement and conquest. No perspicacity or understanding of history in your argument 9:39.

      Delete
    3. @ 9:39

      U are correct about how many nations have blood on their hands. A Nobel cause in spreading one's fruitful faith & life for one's history books.
      We (humans) are destructive by nature. Especially when it pertains economic growth.

      Nice comment

      Delete
  6. In 2018 I traveled to Zitacuaro from Mexico City to visit the Mariposa Biosphere. After arriving in Zitacuaro by bus, you see a couple of heavily armed Policia. Traveling from there to lodges that host butterfly outings, you come to some lodging. The next day after you sleep, you are boarding a horse up a steep terrain to the meadows of the butterfly. They are numerous, magical, until you notice the orange peel used to attract them. From there you hike up the mountain, roughly 10,000 ft. to see the colonies. Impressive. Colonies weighting down tree limbs, fluttering through the air! A one and only.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Can't access link to original article:

    http://primerplaneta/

    Can you provide a good link

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. hmmmm, I see that you are indeed right, let me check.

      Delete
  8. Try Now , It came up using my History so I replaced it.
    I did add stuff about the monarchs, you can use Google to find all kinds of things about them in english or espanol .

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com