Monday, October 21, 2019

Former Gulf Cartel Commander Sentenced

El Armadillo-BorderlandBeat from DEA

HOUSTON - A 34-year-old Mexican man has been ordered to a federal prison sentence following his conviction of conspiracy to import large amounts of cocaine and marijuana, announced Drug Enforcement Administration Special Agent in Charge Will R. Glaspy and U.S. Attorney Ryan K. Patrick.
Luis Ivan Nino-Duenez, El Control, Tamaulipas, Mexico, pleaded guilty June 3, 2014.  
Today, Senior U.S. District Judge Hilda G. Tagle sentenced Nino-Duenes to a total of 20 years in federal prison.
During the hearing, the court heard evidence to support possible increases in the calculated sentencing guideline range. Nino-Duenes utilized automatic weapons, grenades, homemade cannons and body armor to provided security during the purchase, transportation and distribution of narcotics. He also commanded, directed and engaged in violent confrontations with other criminal syndicates to maintain control of the plazas in Mexico. 


He further received enhancements for importation of meth into the United States, maintaining premises for the purpose of manufacturing or distributing a controlled substance and because he committed the offense as part of a pattern of criminal conduct. Finally, the court also found Nino-Duenes was a leader/organizer of an extensive criminal enterprise involving five or more participants.
Nino-Duenes served as a comandante for Jose Luiz Zuniga-Hernandez aka Wicho or XW who served as a gulf cartel plaza boss in El Control for a large period of time between 2008 through 2011.
On Nov. 6, 2010, Zuniga-Hernandez assumed control of the Matamoros Plaza upon the death of Antonio Ezequiel Cardenas-Guillen. On March 28, 2011, Rafael Cardenas-Vela came to Matamoros to take over the plaza management duties and Zuniga-Hernandez returned to El Control.
Cartel Del Golfo transnational criminal organization plaza bosses are appointed to specific regions to help coordinate the importation and distribution of multi-ton shipments of cocaine, marijuana and other illicit narcotics within Mexico and into the United States. They are the lead representatives for the CDG in a particular region or town, responsible for maintaining control of the region and ensuring the safe passage of narcotics. The plaza boss also extracts a "piso," or payment, from others who want to transport narcotics for importation into the United States or operate businesses in that region. 
Additional evidence presented today indicated Zuniga-Hernandez and the CDG smuggled more than one ton of cocaine through the Matamoros/El Control plaza areas and more than 3000 kilograms of marijuana into the United States per month. The CDG used planes and clandestine air strips to fly the cocaine into Mexico for later importation and distribution within the United States.
Zuniga-Hernandez had under his command approximately 120 lookouts and 60 estacas. An estaca is a vehicle occupied by three or four armed individuals. Thus, 60 estacas would be anywhere from 180 to 240 armed individuals patrolling the plaza. Nino-Dunez was the commander of Zuniga-Hernandez’s estacas.Gulf Cartel member sentenced in south Texas to 5 years for illegally possessing a firearm
On Oct. 27, 2011, Zuniga-Hernandez and Nino-Duenes along with Hernandez and Rincon-Rincon fled into the United States after a gun battle in Mexico involving a power struggle between the CDG plazas.
All were found hiding near the Rio Grande River. Upon their arrest, agents found a gold, diamond and ruby encrusted gun, more than $39,000 and several cell phones. Evidence on those phones showed discussions with "Apa" about the gun battle and what to do in response. "Apa" was identified as Jorge Eduardo Costilla-Sanchez, the head of the CDG.
Zuniga-Hernandez, Hernandez and Rincon-Rincon were previously sentenced to 50 years, 35 years and life imprisonment, respectively.
Nino-Duenes will remain in custody pending transfer to a U.S. Bureau of Prisons facility to be determined in the near future.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration and Cameron County Sheriff’s Office conducted the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Angel Castro and Jody Young are prosecuting the case.

31 comments:

  1. Excellent ūüĎć another one to enter the slammer.

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    1. Interesting after Pablo Escobar was dead the importation of drugs into the United States tripled,they lock up cartel bosses cost the American taxpayers money and the drugs keep right on flowing into the USA what does that tell you

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    2. ... and 10 more already lined up to take his place
      ... and you are a few tax dollars
      ... and once he gets out he wont be any better
      ... and the flow of drugs continues unabated
      ... and did I forget something?

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  2. The American's dont mess around. They will lock up these cartel kingpins so long they'll lose their sanity and want to take their own life. The warden of ADX (where el chapo is staying) said death is better than being inside their. Solitary confinement 23 hours per day in a 6x7 ft cell. Being a narco isn't worth it anymore.

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    1. @ 7:46 am Maybe to you it isn't but to many Mexicans living in poverty with little to no chance to improve their lives through legal means it is worth the risk

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    2. At least he is not homeless, 3 meals a day.

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    3. Just like in the USA you lock up one criminal there two more to take their place America's wasting its time fighting a drug war locking up talk to the leaders when they do absolutely nothing about American citizens who continue to purchase the drugs and keep the trade alive

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    4. @10:56 AM: exactly and thereby probably doing better than a lot of the homies he grew up with!

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    5. He also doesn't have to watch his back anymore, no one can touch him, since he is behind bars.

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  3. That’s when all the betrayals between factions we’re starting. Metros might have pushed out wicho.

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  4. 20 years for all that?

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  5. Well at least he helped the poor people ftom small Villages

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  6. When you take down one. 100 more rise up. They need to take down the whole operation. But they are too weak

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    1. ... so Sherlock: what about demand???

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  7. keeping hem for long time given 100 years what they do is killing humans they poison are people

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    1. The people are poisoning themselves nobody forces anyone to use drugs if they want to drug war to stop they need American citizens to stop buying the drugs very simple

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  8. The Americans are the biggest consumers in the world in drugs so for that reason the drug trade will never end
    Don’t make me laugh

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    1. That makes us the most fun! Number one party animals in the world!! I'll take that honor! ūü§ė

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    2. 1221 yes and alot die every year, due to overdosing. Cartels are killing our junkies.

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  9. Im glad they got el chapo son freed from custody ha ha ha

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  10. I think there's more to it,speaking of USA.theres a reason why us is housing all these Mexicans,the us is not clean also,Mexico is not stupid.they figure you guys deal with it here you can feed them cloth them house them protect them ,with tax payers money,will give you all the gangsters ,just let us ?so behind the scene who's the most powerful gangsters of all.?you figure it out!!

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    1. As long as kingpins continue to send contraband to US, there will be a 6x8 room waiting for them.

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    2. Except for all the politicians and bankers that make all this traffic possible they get a pass....This is why the drugs will never end because the true Kingpins never go down

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  11. Dats smart if u put it like dat bro.. tax payers r fitting da bill.. gud stuff

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  12. Usa still the biggest consumer and then they became homelessūüôĄūüôĄūüôĄūüôĄ

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  13. 11 family members were kidnapped in Matamoros around the same time

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  14. Drugs take ur life I've spent years behind bars because of them keep thinking there cool so will u

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  15. Funny n ironically US keeps bringing forgeing drug Lords to Justice but "no clue" on who killed Tupac n biggie...

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