Thursday, July 18, 2019

El Chapo Guzmán, the informant who never was

Chivis Martinez Borderland Beat republished from Nexos

Excellent read by one of my most respected and trusted authors

"T
  
hey are everywhere."

Joaquín Archivaldo Guzmán Loera, better known as El Chapo, looked at the three men in the room with him. For a few minutes he had been babbling incoherently until they entered, and little by little he changed his tone of voice to a normal one. He told them he would be honest with them - he was afraid of his rivals, the Arellano Felix brothers. He offered a deal to the three men: I will give you Arellano Felix and you eliminate the accusations against me and against my brother Arturo.

The two agents of the DEA, the Drug Control Administration of the United States, were accompanied by an agent of the Attorney General of the Republic of Mexico, PGR. None gave way. There is no deal, they said.


For more than a decade and a half, the 1998 meeting between Guzmán and DEA agents Joe Bond and Larry Villalobos, along with José Pepe Patiño Moreno of the PGR in Puente Grande prison, was a US national security secret. But with Guzman now sentenced to life imprisonment without parole ]in the U.S.], more details of that meeting - and the capo's desperate effort to become a DEA informant - have come to light. After the trial, Judge Brian Cogan made public a summary of the classified report; earlier this year, former agent Bond taught him who writes an unaltered copy of the report he and his colleague Villalobos wrote days after his meeting with Guzman in Puente Grande.

The DEA has been criticized for a long time for the relationship it has with its informants. Since the 1970s, the US government - the DEA and the CIA in particular - has been accused several times of entering the territory of money laundering and drug trafficking, but the damage that has lasted the longest, the real one, has occurred through its informants and other criminals who have denounced that the government helps the cartels. Reports in the press since the beginning of this century, which allege collusion between the DEA and the Mexican cartels, which are based on testimonies of drug traffickers, have damaged the efforts of both the DEA and the Mexican authorities to win supporters in what is has turned into a national media war, which includes narcomantas, the internet and public relations offensives in media, very well calculated by the cartels themselves.

A DEA agent who worked in Mexico City at the end of the last decade says without a doubt that "there was no agreement" between the DEA and the Sinaloa Cartel, but admits, under anonymity, that the DEA used information that they provided.

"We take information from where we can get it," he says. "Does a high-level person come from an organization and we're not going to use it?" The main problem: by law, anti-drug agents in Mexico are obliged to deliver this type of information to their Mexican counterparts, which they did not do for lack of confidence. A second problem: what happens when a high-level trafficker tries to become an informant to manipulate the DEA himself?

The day is March 6, 1998. Bond and Villalobos looked at prisoner number 516, freshly shaved and wearing a khaki uniform. The two agents had managed to enter the maximum security prison by posing as social workers; they had false credentials that the PGR had given them. They told the director of the prison that they were going to make personality profiles to the most important prisoners in the prison. The director warned them that there was no guarantee that a group of prisoners wouldn’t kidnap them.

Patiño turned to see Guzmán. Guzmán looked at him angrily. He asked Patiño what he was doing there and told him that he did not trust the PGR. He had already given her information about the Arellano Felix brothers, he told her. The PGR had not acted, and only did it a week after the Arellano Felix had fled. There were other cases that made his lack of confidence even greater, he said. Patiño reassured him by telling him that, nothing he said at the meeting in Puente Grande would be used against him. The DEA agents did not join the pledges.

But this is not Tito, said Guzmán. He wanted only Tito, the man with whom he had negotiated to meet. The man from the DEA, Tito. Tito was the name that Guzmán had given the emissary before he even met Bond or Villalobos.

DEA agent Bond had reached Mexico City in late 1997. He was born and raised in the city, then moved to Mississippi and become state police and subsequently joining the DEA. Only a few months after his arrival in the capital he had already entered into strategic alliances with his counterparts in the PGR. His knowledge of the language helped him a lot, as well as his understanding of the culture. He had read Guzman's files, as did Villalobos, a DEA intelligence analyst.

Guzmán was in jail, but even so nobody had as much knowledge of the operations of the Sinaloa Cartel as he did. The DEA knew that he handled everything from jail, in particular through his lawyer and Arturo, one of his brothers.

Shortly after landing in Mexico, Bond received a visitor who had no appointment with him. A possible informant, perhaps, a few blocks from the US embassy. Guzmán had sent a relative, whose name will not be revealed for his own protection, to meet with the DEA. Given his relationship with Guzmán - the man said to be his brother-in-law - the man could have been what the DEA calls "the goose that lays the golden eggs."

Bond was very interested. The nickname of the informant, chosen by Guzmán, would be Elektra. "He wants to talk to you," Elektra told Bond. "Guzman wanted to meet with the DEA at Puente Grande. Bond immediately requested permission from his Mexican counterparts, while also holding frequent meetings with Elektra. Bond thought about all the variables. Were they using it? How could El Chapo use it?

Why would he want to use Bond, to get closer to his enemy?

The Sinaloa Cartel, according to former DEA agents who worked in Mexico during the 1990s, probably already had its tentacles around Mexico's law enforcement agencies. "These guys have informants in every agency," says DEA's former head of International Operations, Mike Vigil. "They know how the government thinks. Guzmán knew this. I thought: 'The United States is the same and is interested in my importance'. Guzmán studied the DEA. “What he wanted from the DEA was not clear, according to Bond, and Elektra could not give any detail. Guzman perhaps thought that the "empty suits" of the DEA in Washington - bureaucrats with the minimum understanding of street-level operations - would believe that he was a big shot they needed to bring back, says Vigil. Bond told his superiors and received the green light, although he remained skeptical.

On March 5, Bond sent a message to Guzmán through Elektra: we have the authorization of the Mexican government to enter Puente Grande. Bond did not give him more details, neither date nor time. The agents of the DEA would call him to the mission Operation Apocalypse. It was a breakthrough of enormous proportions: no US agent had stepped inside a maximum security prison in Mexico; much less had he interviewed an inmate.

Guzmán received the message. But he never thought they would arrive the next day, Bond says 20 years later.

When the agents arrived and gave the password, Guzmán threw himself to the floor to check that they were not being eavesdropped. There was a one-sided mirror in the room; Bond thought that agents were being recorded for his protection rather than his motives.

Bond knew that the DEA already had informants inside the Arellano Felix cartel, but Guzman surely knew more. Bond also knew that he was in danger of crossing an important line. "Who else would help him [Guzman] eliminate his main rivals but the DEA?" he thought. He reflected on the consequences.

Guzmán remained firm: he wanted to give information to the DEA, but he also insisted that he move to a lower security prison to be able to give orders to his people more easily. In order to be transferred to another prison, El Chapo told the agents that he would face accusations of the murder of Francisco Rodolfo Álvarez Fáber, attorney general of Sinaloa, in April 1993. If that judicial process was respected, he suggested, there would be no greater media interest in his transfer to another prison, which would undoubtedly be interpreted by his rivals as having revealed information about them. If he did not fulfill his promise to the DEA -intelligence to stop his enemies- he told them that he "had no problem returning" to the maximum security prison to purge his sentence.

Guzmán spoke for three hours. He told some of his story to DEA agents, as well as one of his predecessors. It was true that there had been a meeting of the new generation of capos, but it had only happened after the arrest of Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, and it had happened in Mexico City, not Acapulco. The meeting was held in the early nineties. Benjamín Arellano Félix, Rafael Aguilar-Guajardo, Amado Carrillo Fuentes, Emilio Quintero-Payán and Guzmán had created "The Federation", according to the report that Bond and Villalobos wrote.

Guzmán admitted that he killed some "bad people." "We did not start the war," he added, referring to what was happening in Tijuana at that time. "They" wanted to blame him for that, just as "they" had blamed him for the murder of Cardinal Jesus Posadas Ocampo in 1993. Guzmán insisted that Ramón Arellano Félix was the one who broke the agreement in Mexico City. Guzmán gave information to the agents about the hierarchy of the Arellano Felix cartel and some details about drug trafficking and a tunnel. He added that Héctor Güero Palma, also in Puente Grande, was now his enemy and that he also had information about him and his group.

Guzmán had already spoken to the authorities before, but in a more discreet way and in such a way that what he said could not be used as testimony, not even under Mexican law, where he was guilty until proven otherwise. In 1993, after his capture in Guatemala, the DEA and its Mexican counterparts had laughed, when hearing that the Guatemalan army took Guzmán to the Mexicans, tied up and gagged, lying in the back of a pickup truck in which turned like a log while they were traveling  along a dirt road, recalls the former Chief Vigil, who at the time was in Mexico City, "it was hilarious." But in the military helicopter that transported him to the capital, Guzmán was already negotiating, supposedly telling the soldiers that he was guilty of drug trafficking but not of killing the cardinal.

During the meeting in Puente Grande with Bond and Villalobos, Guzmán emphasized that he wanted to eliminate the accusations against his brother Arturo, who had been arrested in Arizona with 1.26 million dollars in cash in 1989, adding that he was worried the safety of your family. At the end of the interview, and to demonstrate his value as an informant, Guzmán told the agents that the Mexican ambassador to France and the attorney general would be assassinated soon.

"Do not tell me mamadas,[in this context meaning useless]" Bond told him closely. "Give me more evidence." "Ok, Tito , no problem." "If you tell me mamadas, this is over. You want me to work this for you, then you have to work with me. "

"I think nobody has ever talked to him like that," says Bond. He left the meeting with the impression that Guzmán felt he was losing control. "I was already trying to leave everything behind," he said.

Guzmán's predictions never happened.

Bond and Villalobos left Puente Grande by the main gate, just as Guzmán would do a few years later. They would never meet again-Patiño appeared dead in the summer of 2000, run over by a cement mixer outside of Tijuana, moments after meeting with DEA ​​agents across the border. But Guzmán would try again to negotiate with the DEA. A few months after the meeting in Puente Grande, Bond received another visit at the US embassy - Guzmán's second wife, Griselda López Pérez. She wanted US visas for herself and her two children; her name was on a list, and embassy staff alerted Bond as soon as the alerts went off. They talked near the embassy for no more than 15 minutes, and Bond asked her to get him an informant, someone close to Guzmán. Elektra was not good enough, he said; I needed a blood relative, someone from his inner circle.

Griselda agreed to hand him over to Arturo. Not in exchange for visas; this was a deal only of information. The implicit agreement was that Guzman would quietly purge his sentence in a Mexican jail, off the radar of the DEA, if Arturo provided information.

Despite the new agreement, which still did not bear fruit, Elektra and Bond continued to talk on the phone during 2001, after Guzmán's brash escape from Puente Grande. Bond knew that the US federal prosecutor's office had Arturo arrested in Arizona on a lesser charge - the transfer of proceeds from the sale of drugs involved a 10-year sentence, and he would leave in seven with good behavior. If he could get Arturo to work with the DEA, he could use that information against the other cartels and eventually against the other members of the Guzman family, if they could survive all this.

Griselda arranged a meeting. It would take place at the Bristol Hotel, a few blocks from the US embassy. Griselda would not attend. Arturo would go with his bodyguard, who would wait in an adjoining room while Bond and Arturo talked.

By then, Bond had been in Mexico City for three years, and had a close relationship with Genaro García Luna, then head of the AFI. They shared information and intelligence very often, but not always.

Bond called Elektra for the last time. He was worried about his informant, whom he considered "the best". With the Guzmán fugitive, Elektra was no longer such a good emissary. He was an informant of the DEA. "You already burned yourself. They're going to kill you, "Bond told Elektra, and warned him that they would have to end their relationship. García Luna intercepted the call and hid Elektra in El Pedregal, in a house that had belonged to Amado Carrillo Fuentes before being confiscated by the Mexican government. He called Bond.

Bond told him what he was doing and what he was planning. They agreed that the meeting with Arturo would stand, but García Luna would attend, disguised as Bond's driver. He would sit in the other room with Arturo's bodyguard.

The meeting went as planned - luckily Arturo did not identify García Luna when they met in the corridor. They talked but shared little information. Bond gave Arturo a cell phone, and a number that would only be used for calls between them. Arturo told Bond that he "could fix" a meeting between him and Guzmán.

Hours later, while he was leaving the capital by car, Arturo was arrested by members of García Luna's police. He would be murdered in jail in 2004. Bond would never again approach Guzmán. "He was my best informant," Bond says of Elektra.

Bond was furious with García Luna. Garcia Luna told him that he could not let Arturo run away because he could get him a meeting with Guzmán. But Bond understood why he told him. His bosses carried the guilt of having let Guzmán escape from Puente Grande. They could not let their brother, also a fugitive, escape.

The information that Guzmán gave to the DEA directly, or through Arturo, or Griselda or Elektra never led to anything, according to Bond. Elektra received a reward for the information given and now lives a new life under the supervision of the United States government. Arturo's charges were never obliterated, and during Guzman's trial in Brooklyn the money that was seized from his car was the key piece of evidence from the prosecution for the charge of money laundering.

If Guzman had reached a deal with the authorities and had given them useful intelligence from Puente Grande, he might have received a lower sentence. He might even be out of jail today, 26 years after his arrest. Instead, the informant who never was will spend the rest of his days in the United States. "It was a fishing rod without a hook," says Vigil. "I wanted to catch fish with just one hook."

By Malcolm Beith

75 comments:

  1. Chapo snitched and wanted to snitch!!! Gris and Arturo also...
    I am sure Chapo gave up Mochomo to have his son released...

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    1. Yes, it is the only thing that is logical, Mochomo captured, when only 2 people knew his whereabouts, his bro and Chapo, shortly after chapo's son is released after 3 years in Altiplano. and the blo war against chapo commenced

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    2. Is it know who Elektra is?

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    3. I agree with you.. chapo was a backstabbing pos.. now he wants to cry about inhumane conditions and what not..

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    4. Chivis, what was his motive for ratting out Alfredo? There had to be bigger fish to give up for Ivan. I'm sure Arturo or Hector, Barbie would've been a bigger name to have busted. And weren't the BL brothers the ones who had all the gov connects? I don't doubt Chapo had a hand in Mochomos arrest, but there has to be more to it. Am I off base??

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    5. Chivis can you get access to the actual DEA documents the publisher is basing the story from?

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    6. I noticed how the blo capos never really snitch like mochomo that took his life sentence, Isidro will probrably do the same or go out shooting.

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    7. So the person who keeps writing “Chapo snitched” is right after all lol

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    8. "The information that Guzmán gave to the DEA directly, or through Arturo, or Griselda or Elektra never led to anything, according to Bond." So Guzmans tips never led to anything so how did he snitch? Even the title of the article is "The informant who never was."

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    9. Hey Rojo!
      I am sure it was a difficult decision...but he had to make a deal with the government who was not allowing chapos son Ivan out of prison, where he languished for 3 years and no hope of leaving altiplano.

      I think he thought mochomo would not stay more than 5 or 10 years and he was young. chapo and arturo were the only two who knew where mochomo was.

      Ivan released, and Mochomo captured. that turned into a extradition after serving his time and plead guilty without a deal and still rec a life without parole sentence.

      in essence if chapo gave him up he took hi life in exchange for his son's freedom. that is what caused the war with BLO

      i wasn't sure this was true even though it is common belief with mexican journalists, but now knowing how he wanted to work with the U.S. and sending his bro to give info that was actually used against him in trial for the charge of money laundering---I now believe it to be true.

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    10. Chapos sons turned out to be a pain in the @$$ , they even got kidnapped lol

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  2. Finally posted the article I was referring too
    I kind of feel bad for chapo though eventhough he was a bad guy but he got used and abused by the system who promised to protect him if he gave information "snitched "
    Chapo snitched..

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    1. It was published yesterday in spanish did you see it in english?

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    2. @ Chivis according to Zeta chapo was moved to adx yesterday. Link below

      https://zetatijuana.com/2019/07/el-chapo-ya-no-esta-en-ny-podria-ir-a-misma-prision-de-osiel-cardenas-el-tigrillo-arellano-felix-y-garcia-abrego/?fbclid=IwAR2qUY1jma3ypqt5WsQ42v36iy1sf7y6ibEebneqmvr3eqKADbad5cWzdT4

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    3. it is true and i confirmed the story. i have it up now, it was in draft waiting for a few hours. thank you!

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    4. 10:02 you must be a dumb ass to think the dea is gonna protect and let you do as you please if you snitch on your friends, he deserves everything he got and more, you really think he feels bad for all those people he and his people killed? He is a terrorist should of been treated the same, i heard his cell is almost twice as big as the terrorist that are locked up in the same prison

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    5. 10:02 theres been a story in English for about 5 or 6 years that I know off.. I googled chapo cooperating with DEA agents and the story comes up

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  3. sicario006 the #1 snitch cartel cheerleader

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  4. I think it’s been well known that Chapo ratted our enemies and colleagues for husband own benefit over the years. Drug traffickers of every country do the same when it benefits them, while claiming to hate “rats” and “leaks”.

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    1. They call it cooperating now lol like it's different.

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    2. Chapo's partners in Mexico and the US governments mainly, needed to keep some orderly operation, but new order has decided it is time to rob their beloved "rapido" of all his earnings, after all some of them were got off unauthorized "side jobs" like Noriega's

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  5. Been saying it all my life he started wars with his snitching and everybody praised him .... I wonder where his cheerleaders are now... they're probably cheering for el mencho now

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    1. All your life wow you must have nothing else to do you must be the greatest cheerleader of them all. Just because you have a favoritism to a narco all of a sudden chapo snitched and you hate him but other narcos are saints.

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    2. Who did he snitch on? Not saying Chapo did because this article is contradicting but Pablo Ecobar did the same..the big bosses sometimes have to give people up that screw up.

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  6. It still makes me wonder what did he have to gain, by not blowing up the house? The obvious answer is his family would be protected. Do you think this message was relayed from Mayo or Chapitos? I am guessing Chapitos.

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  7. Chapo Snitched COPYRIGHT

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    1. You must have a reading comprehension problem. The title literally says "The informant who never was."

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  8. Its not like he will ever be The Last Drug Kingpin.

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  9. I always knew that the “chapo snitched” guy was right.. where are all the CDS cheerleaders now... hahahah pinches soplones.. lets have them make a corrido about how brave chapo was when he met w deA,..ALL CDS are rats, tweekers and baby killers. But they’re in denial...

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    1. Dude, and you're saying that Mencho doesn't snitch? They all snitch in order to achieve their interests.

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    2. Every MF rats when its time to save your own ass

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    3. It's easy to keep your mouth shut for street level short time skullduggery, but when you're looking at life W/O, or death, hell even a dime, your instinct of basic survival kick in. Also, in that game, it's hit 1st, and take them down before they take you down. By any means necessary. Besides if you're in the moral realm of decapitation and dismembering your enemies, then dropping dimes is not a big deal. The Mob guys all ratted out each other. If your in a criminal org, and several top guys are busted, it's a race of who rats 1st. If you're last, you take it up the rear, while everyone else gets off easier.

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    4. 11:32 you'd be lucky if you could afford some chirrines for 3 hours much less have a corrido made for you.

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    5. We already know all the guys on hear talking shit about chapo and CDS have already order some shirts and blazers from the chapoguzman701 .clothingline. talk all that shit and fucken still be on the SINALOENSE nuts dame sucks being you always feeling like your in some one elses shadow

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    6. These guys........ all narcos rat and pay off the police and government officials now somehow you all hate chapo relax guys he’s doing life plus 30 years and you guys are still crying.

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    7. No I haven’t ordered t shirts, and it’s funny all you sinaloenses are trying to justify that ratting is ok, a rat is always gonna be a RAT. Whitey bulger was an FBI informant, he was never forgiven he was whacked out recently.. and corridos aren’t really that expensive to be made. It’s like 15-25k.. y’all chancludos just sour cuz the truth hurts.. A RAT WILL ALWAYS Be a rat. And yes, they’re a men like JOHN GOTTI who kept his honor and wouldn’t rat on anyone. So don’t give me any BS about “racing to rat” i’d figured that that’s how y’all rats Would look at it.

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    8. 8:52 well said, respect for mochomo thats a real capo, he lived that life and took his sentence like a real man, chapo is crying for nothing and his cheerleaders who said that chapo was a real man and could swallow the hole world now are saying he does not deserve his punishment! What a bunch of two face vaginas, with all do respect to all real vaginas

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  10. CJNG taking out the trash

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  11. Things have changed so much in the underworld,not too many 1%ers left.
    Once the U.S Attorney mentions anything over 20 yrs,the majority will let loose at the tongue.Guzman lived it up,had anything he wanted,now he would trade all of his riches for his freedom.
    To all of you making fast money who think it cant happen to you,think again.Everyone is vulnerable,informants are everywhere.

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    1. He could had traded it for freedom but he chose to stay quiet and take it like a man.. unlike others

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    2. Facts.. we still forget who the real bosses have been the ones who has been running the show the whole time why do we emphasize the organization to be all chapo rcq and Mz have been at the head the whole time chapo has been the mascot for decades cds is not a club its 1000s of families aligned for a common purpose to make shit tons of money we never seen chapo in AP his father in law was arrested here his tunnels were here but who ran it..M100 chapo didn't run shit here but was aligned here just like we moved mochomos shit here to before the dumb shit but we held it here not chapos ppl and sonorenses the only state not besieged yeah there's cjng and were Zs FM here but get eaten immediately check the facts

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    3. 1:00 I agree, and I hope you are talking to fake ass billionaire narco politicians too, some of them populate politics on the US these days, because they discovered there is a world of trillions of dollars to con from the US credit card... No cash left, besides electronic transfers make it much easier to move your and others' treasury these day, even convert it into other currencies and hide it coming and going.

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    4. Rather, until the government wants u out. No drug kingpin can operate at such high levels without government consent (bribes).
      The legal rights of activities by government do not correspond with those actions of criminals!

      No whose next to get the spotlight on The War On Drugs? Nothing changes. Drugs will continue to pour into our communities. Killing many from all aspects of life. Same cycle like a curse.

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    5. 7:18 Guzman DID try to cooperate but the U.S wasnt having it.He must've have pissed off some of the top brass in the Justice Department.Besides,the big wigs in the drug trade are untouchable as long as they play by the rules Uncle Sam has in place.Just look at all the Politicos in Mexico.

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  12. Cjng are snitches to. Mencho turned in alot of his fellow milenio comrades,thats why menchos people were called los torcidos.

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  13. I thought it was a joke whenever someone posted that el chapo snitched but damn!!!

    I see him very differently now. He's not el mero mero like everyone thought...just a snitch. He didn't even fight till the end como el botas blancas.

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  14. It's funny to see you guys drop comments, calling people cowards and snitches when at the end of the day you're all so irrelevant when it comes to the whole drug trafficking world. Ay ya yay, la neta que como hay de payasos.

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    1. 4:48 No mames guey tu estas igual que nosotros ni quien te pele, si te duele que el chapo se va a podrir en la carcel ve y asle compañia jotin, disiendo que uno es irrelevante y tu estas igual, es como si yo me burlara de un mariguano mientras me fumo un churro jajaja estas bien pendejo

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    2. I didn't call anyone names, but I must say I'm happy to be irrelevant in the drug trafficking world, and on the outside of prison gates, and not 6 feet under.

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  15. All the people talking about snitching and dont even know the way all this shit really works all of them do what has to be done to get Reid of ther enemies if they can't kill them they use the goverment or blame them for crimes to make them a priority to catch.just like mencho is doing in guanajuato with marro and he snitched on el 85 and Lobo valencia thers no real rules in ther business cause at the end of the day if they thing your against them your dead and if they cant get to you well your family will do for know and some times people think some one snitched on them .ya themselves using the phones#1reason the always have some bodys phone tapped

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  16. Chivis with the Chapo snitched line lol. Shoutout to original Chapo snitch poster

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  17. Electra + Mayo = snitch2

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  18. Sicario Anda komprando terrenos junto ALA prison y pienza azer Un tunnel, you a looser sicario

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  19. Jose "pepe" Patino Moreno a fearless uncorruptible Mexican PGR agent was found dead in his car, after being kidnapped, his head had been crushed in a brake press and had all his bones broken in little pieces, had been tortured and then killed, he was careless in spite of repeated warnings.
    Los Angeles Times: Deadly Messages to Mexico by Mark Fineman and Chris Kraul, nice report, but everybody snitches and sometimes it does not matter specially when somebody has a hard on for you, the CIA WAS TAKING IT EASY in the 90s because of their murdering of Kiki Camrena, but by then they had their men in the DEA, dismantling operation Legend and all involved, threatening Hector Berrellez but failing to scare him, there were Sandi Gonzales, Cele Castillo, Phil Jordan, getting their reputations soiled by a US government ladden with corruption. But the CIA and not the DEA worked the drug trafficking from LatinAmerica and much of the world to the US, far longer than the DEA created by Nixxon when he was president, by then the CIA had hundreds of years in the business even as Fruit United and Chiquita Bananas, DEA corruption is just the latest newcomer to the field of war on drugs but there were real agents there not that long ago. Add to the list Mike Levine and Mike Vigil. And a few others muzzled by a government that does not appreciate their honesty or their service a bit.
    It is no wonder Genarco Garcia Luna got Chapo brother killed, his AFI did not survive presidente FOX, but he got promoted to SSP de Mexico with FECAL, and MADE MANY US mercenaries happy by heading their war ON drugs that cost the US taxpayers 36 billion dollars in 12 years and the mexicans about 1 million murdered, killed, dead and disappeared to make some US mercenaries coin. While drug trafficking got WORSE, that is the only thing that changed, and the Mexican economy that got more colonized

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    1. Good information mate! So you believe the CIA took out KiKi.

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  20. Malcolm Beith is such a good writer, got plenty of books by him. My favorite is The Last Narco

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    1. Agree and i can say he is a true gentleman. BUT he was the editor of Newsweek before the book and free lance after, which books are yo speaking of?

      He told me he is not writing any additional narco books. also that he always intended the last narco to be a primer. I have it on display sitting on my desk. it is printed in 7 languages.

      a story: Mochomo;s former cell mate told me asked him if he wanted his wife to bring him anything---he asked for the last narco. 'jack' says he asked for one in english. it was there he saw the foto of mochomo and realized who his cell mate was. they remain good friends to this day. I verified with mochomo's atty that 'jack' was the real deal....

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    2. @Chivis, To this Day!!!!

      -Deontae Wilder

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  21. Guards at ADX should put ADL and Guzman in same cell let them fight to death

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  22. “Chapo snitched” not saying it’s right but every criminal organization has someone who talks. The Sicilian Mafia (aka) Cosa Nostra, to the American gangster Frank Lucas and Griselda Blanco to even Rene Boxer Enriquez the Mexican Mafia informant.

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    Replies
    1. Not Mochomo tho.

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    2. Not John gotti either

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    3. 9:13 Chapo and Vicente Zambada Niebla demanded their witnesses come and talk, the CIA REFUSED, but got Zambada a sweet heart deal.
      --El Chapo is not talking about it yet, but I believe there is a stinking deal.

      Delete
  23. All is fair in love and war... tactics my friends!! still powerful as ever and his bloodline still runs a very powerful empire come to Sonora and take a look a what real men of buisnesss have maintained snitch or not el senor se respeta the difference between cartel and gangs

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  24. If Chapo was smart he'd have offered to give up the Federation in exchange for an allowance to milk his distribution network for a couple of years, then retire with a few hundred million dollars and live unmolested anywhere he wanted to. His thirst for power and greed wouldn't allow it.

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  25. This is why you never cooperate...it’s truth for lies. You give them the truth and they pay you in lies.

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  26. So Amlo u want him back?

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  27. Corridos that flooded the air waves about how brave and noble cds was nothing but lies!!! Sinaloa tierra de gallos que saben cantar!!!

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  28. PEOPLE---THE CHAPO SENTENCED POST STOP TAKING COMMENTS AT 222 BLOGGER ALLOWS A LIMITED SPACE...WE HAVE ALMOST 500

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  29. Most of this info isn't that recent or had been kept that secret. Bond and Villalobos spoke on this publicly in separate televised interviews a few years back, even when Chapo was still in Mexico. Bond did one with Telemundo in 2017 and Villalobos did one with Univision in 2016. Not sure if it was before or after this author wrote about it though. There are few differences and inconsistencies with both interviews though. In the Univision interview, Villalobos said that the code phrase that had been agreed upon beforehand was "Soy Pepe". In the Telemundo interview, Bond said that the code phrase was "Soy Tito". In the Univision interview, it's said that the third individual, the agent from the PGR, was tortured and killed by the Arellano, and his remains and car were thrown from a cliff to make it appear that he had died in a car accident, not run over by a cement mixer as stated in this article. Here are the links to both interviews.


    Bond's interview with Telemundo https://youtu.be/pzlR6tICEN4

    Villalobos' interview with Univision
    https://youtu.be/KMJHuqDc_p4

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  30. It’s funny all these sinaloenses trying to make it sound like it’s ok to rat, and they start bringing up other names, you guys are true LAMES. Oh, and at 5:14 we love staying in the shadows. You guys can have the LIGHT... pinches plasticones...

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  31. Still doesnt mean shit. I wouldnt believe anything the dea says, there never gonna tell us what really went down theyre always just gonna try to cover their asses. And who knows if chapo had a secret deal with other agents or the cia.. shit like this will always be a mystery to the rest of the world. For good reason.

    ReplyDelete

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