Wednesday, July 18, 2018

New US State Dept Travel Warning Highlights 5 Mexican States

Posted by Yaqui for Borderland Beat from: US State Dept

July 18, 2018
NOTE: I first read this is Mexican Press. Check out this cool website where these images and much more come from: HERE

Mexico Travel Advisory:  July 16, 2018  Mexico - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
       Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime. Some areas have increased risk.

Please read the entire Travel Advisory.
Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico as U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to these areas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from intercity travel after dark in many areas of Mexico. U.S. government employees are also not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico with the exception of daytime travel on Highway 15 between Nogales and Hermosillo.

DO NOT Travel to:

Colima State due to crime.
Guerrero State due to crime.
Michoacán State due to crime.
Sinaloa State due to crime.
Tamaulipas State due to crime.

For all other states in Mexico please see detailed information below.
Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.     

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving at night.
Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts
and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Mexico.
U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Aguascalientes State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
        Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities at night. Additionally, U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Aguascalientes.

Baja California State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
       Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

Due to poor cellular service and hazardous road conditions, U.S. government employees are only permitted to travel on “La Rumorosa” between Mexicali and Tijuana on the toll road during daylight.

There are no U.S. government restrictions in tourist areas in Baja California, which includes: Ensenada, Rosarito, and Tijuana.

Baja California Sur State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
       Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. 

There are no U.S. government restrictions for travel in Baja California Sur, which includes the tourist areas of Cabo San Lucas, San Jose del Cabo, and La Paz.

Campeche State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
       Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Chiapas State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
        Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees in tourist areas in Chiapas state, such as: Palenque, San Cristobal de las Casas, and Tuxtla Gutierrez.

Chihuahua State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
       Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

Ciudad Juarez: Due to an increase in homicides throughout Ciudad Juarez, U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to downtown Ciudad Juarez and the area west of Avenida de Las Americas without advance permission. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel after dark west of Eje Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region.

Within the city of Chihuahua: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts.

Ojinaga: U.S. government employees must travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas port-of-entry.

Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: U.S. government employees must use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico port-of- entry.

Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel outside city limits after dark.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Coahuila State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
     Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Local law enforcement has limited capability to prevent and respond to crime, particularly in the northern part of the state.

U.S. government employees are not permitted to travel in Coahuila state, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente. U.S. government employees can only travel to those cities using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

U.S. government employees are permitted to travel to Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuna but they must travel to these cities from the United States only.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Coahuila.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Colima State – Level 4: Do Not Travel
       Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to Tecoman or within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoacán border and on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border. 

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees travel along Route 200 from the Jalisco border to Manzanillo, including the Manzanillo airport.  There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in Manzanillo from Marina Puerto Santiago to Playa las Brisas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Colima.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Durango State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
       Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity along the highways are common.

U.S. government employees may travel outside the city of Durango only during daylight on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Durango city.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Durango.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Estado de Mexico State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
       Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is common in parts of Estado de Mexico.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the following municipalities, unless they are traveling directly through the municipalities on major thoroughfares:


Coacalco
Ecatepec
Nezahualcoyotl
La Paz
Valle del Chalco
Solidaridad
Chalco
Ixtapaluca
Tlatlaya

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads between Morelos, Huitzilac, and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Guanajuato State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
      Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Guerrero State – Level 4: Do Not Travel
     Do not travel due to crime. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Hidalgo State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
        Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Jalisco State – Level 3: Reconsider Trave
       Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to areas bordering Michoacán and Zacatecas states. U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities after dark and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta.

U.S. government employees may use federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City. However, they may not stop in the towns of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Jalisco.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in the following tourist areas in Jalisco state: Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, Chapala, and Ajijic.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Mexico City – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
      Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Michoacán State – Level 4: Do Not Travel
      Do not travel due to crime. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in Michoacán state, with the exception of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas cities and the area north of federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel by land, except on federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees may fly into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Morelos State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
      Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads from Huitzilac to Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nayarit State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
    Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nayarit state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state, with the following exceptions:

Riviera Nayarit (which includes Nuevo Vallarta and Bahia de Banderas)
Santa Maria del Oro
Xalisco
When traveling to permitted areas above, U.S. government employees must use major highways and cannot travel between cities after dark.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nayarit.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nuevo Leon State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
     Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nuevo Leon state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Monterrey only during daylight on toll roads, with the exception of travel to the Monterrey airport, which is permitted at any time.

U.S. government employees must remain within San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river) municipalities between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nuevo Leon.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Oaxaca State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
      Exercise increased caution due to crime.

In Oaxaca, U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
     Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Queretaro State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
     Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Quintana Roo State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
      Exercise increased caution due to crime.

According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring or killing bystanders have occurred.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Quintana Roo state, which includes tourist areas such as: Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and the Riviera Maya.

San Luis Potosi State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
     Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of San Luis Potosi state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside San Luis Potosi city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within San Luis Potosi city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in San Luis Potosi.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sinaloa State – Level 4: Do Not Travel
     Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based and operating in Sinaloa state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state. In areas where travel is permitted, the following restrictions are in place:

Mazatlan: U.S. government travel is permitted only in Zona Dorada, the historic town center, and direct routes to and from these locations and the airport or the cruise ship terminal.

Los Mochis and Port Topolobampo: U.S. government travel is permitted within the city and the port, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sonora State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
      Reconsider travel due to crime. Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. However, northern Sonora experiences much lower levels of crime than cities closer to Sinaloa and other parts of Mexico. U.S. government employees visiting Puerto Peñasco may use the Lukeville/Sonoyta crossing, and are required to travel during daylight hours on Route 8. U.S. government employees may also travel to Puerto Peñasco from Nogales by using Route 15 south and east via Routes 2 and 37 through Caborca during daylight hours. U.S. government employees may travel between the cities of Nogales and Hemosillo, however, travel is restricted to daylight hours and only on Route 15 through Imuris, Magdalena, and Santa Ana.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to:

The triangular region west of the Mariposa port-of-entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar.
The district within Nogales that lies to the north of Ayenida Instituto Tecnologico and between Periferico and Corredor Fiscal, and the residential areas to the east of Plutarco Elias Calles. U.S. government employees are not permitted to use taxi services in Nogales, but bus travel is permitted. Movement around the city after dark is by vehicle only. U.S. government employees should avoid El Centro and all night clubs after 10:00 p.m.

The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).

South of Hermosillo, with the exception of the cities of Alamos, San Carlos, Guaymas, and Empalme.

Travel of U.S. government employees to the following cities is permitted with the noted restrictions:

San Luis Rio Colorado: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the San Luis, Arizona port-of-entry and may not travel beyond the city limits.
Cananea: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the Naco, Arizona port-of-entry and along Route 2 to Cananea, including the Cananea mine, and may not travel beyond the city limits. 
Agua Prieta: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the Douglas, Arizona port-of-entry and may not travel beyond the city limits.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tabasco State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
       Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Tamaulipas State – Level 4: Do Not Travel
        Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault, is common. Gang activity, including gun battles, is widespread. Armed criminal groups target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments. Local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to violence in many parts of the state.

U.S. government employees are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Tamaulipas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tlaxcala State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
      Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Veracruz State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
       Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

Yucatan State – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution
       Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Yucatan state, which includes tourist areas such as: Chichen Itza, Merida, Uxmal, and Valladolid.

Zacatecas State – Level 3: Reconsider Travel
      Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Zacatecas state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Zacatecas city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within Zacatecas city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Zacatecas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Travel Advisory Levels:

Assistance for U.S. Citizens
U.S. Embassy Mexico City Paseo de la Reforma 305
Colonia Cuauhtemoc
Mexico, D.F., Mexico C.P.
06500 Telephone011-52-55-5080-2000  EmergencyAmerican Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512 (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.) Fax011-52-55-5080-2201 Email ACSMexicoCity@state.gov Website U.S. Embassy Mexico City

48 comments:

  1. Todo calmado compas no pasa nada en chinola todo tranquilo.
    -💯

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. asi es mientras ande uno tranki no pasa nada.son muy pancheros los del gobierno.

      Delete
  2. Many of us will stay make those trips. - Sol Prendido

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    Replies
    1. damn right i travel to northern mexico during my kids vacations or any special occasion.

      out of all the states mention tamaulipas has a higher treat level.
      cdg and zetas keep an eye out for tourist at night clubs and etc.

      Delete
  3. Looking through the warnings and advisories in Mexico by US. Suggestion should read as follows; No traveling through or near the country of Mexico.

    E42



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  4. Thanks Yaqui, excellent report.

    Read through the whole list - I lived in Mexico 5 years and have traveled by bus, hitchhiking, and driving through all the states except Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, and Durango. Veracruz, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Yucatan and Q Roo were my favorite states.

    Michoacan sounds red hot. If even Patzcuaro and Lake Janitzio are off limits then must be very troublesome. Too bad as that is a very scenic area and needs tourists to boost the local economies.

    Tamaulipis sounds totally out of control, some serious lawlessness there. Have only passed through as there's nothing for tourists there. On our way to Belize in 79, we stopped at a town called Sota La Marina that was scary AF. Everyone tried to sell us dope, rip us off, el mal ojo, the works.

    Jalisco used to be fairly peaceful and is now more violent than ever, lastima.

    Those areas mentioned in the Estado de Mexico section - they are scary and horrible. No tourist goes there, warning or not. Ecatepec, Chalco, Itztapaluca, Nezahualcoyotl - the worstest and ugliest slums ever even worse than the shanties in Juarez, Nogales, and Tijuana.

    Surprised it doesn't mention Tepito market in DF, that's a good place to score dope and get your ass kicked. I suppose the government employees already know that jajajaja

    Wondering how many government employees do indeed travel in la provincia, and how seriously they take the restrictions. If someone snitches (like Chapo LOL)on them enjoying the nightlife and gunfire in an area that's been restricted, do they get fined or written up or what's the penalty? I get it that it's a warning but just wondering if anyone knows why anyone working for the US Government would be crazy enough to take a bus through Tamaulipis, or would have reason to.

    Be careful out there!

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  5. I’m a white guy I have an Asian wife and my kids are obviously half, were American, we live in Long Beach CA... We’re Considering buying a place in Tulum, Playa del Carmen or Puerto Morelos. I’ve heard nothing but great things about the area and we’re going to visit soon and I’ve been doing heavy research about it. I have been to Los Cabos/Cabo San, TJ but nowhere else. With all the somewhat sensationalized media coverage in US about Mexico I’ve been a little apprehensive to go lately. Can anyone who lives in the Quintana Roo area comment? It seems lots of Americans and Canadians are moving there. Thanks so much for your time and advice!

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    1. Yes, Great areas to live. Occasionally you witness a gunfight on the street or dead body somewhere. Other than that, things are great, good eating establishments and friendly people. You just have to have an open mind..

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    2. Yeah don't don't do it. There were nearly 30k reported homicides in Mexico last year. That doesn't include people that went missing/disappeared. The Yucatán peninsula has seen a huge up tick in violence as Dona Lety got picked up.

      I'm not saying something will happen, but you are definitely putting your family at risk.

      If you are looking for a cheap paradise to buy a house there are other safer places in the world. It sucks cause I love Mexico, and its people are amazing. But it is chaos down there right now! Not sure if you visit this site much, but there were over 130 political candidates(past, current, and future) murdered this past year. Not sure if there were any arrests. Does that sound like a place you'd want to be with your family?

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    3. R U Loco ? DO NOT INVEST a dime in Mexico right now. if you insist on hanging out down there, RENT for a couple of yrs to suss things out for gods sake ! I keep telling everyone the same thing. Who you know in MX is EVERYTHING. IF you are green and don’t know or are ingrained with locals you are in for a chingada.




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    4. I agree with 9:06, don't make a commitment until you have spent a few months there IN THE RAINY HOT SEASON when there aren't many visitors. A lot of the Americans and Canadians are there only because they're snowbirds escaping cold winters.

      Also, IMHO Tulum, PDC, the whole Maya Riviera has been spoiled by way too many tourists, especially hipsters from New York and Eurohippie backpackers.

      Los Cabos is full of Californians taking drugs, and there's plenty of cartel action there. I'd avoid it.

      Delete
    5. Tulum is very safe. I'm planning to buy in Yucatan it's very very peaceful and would make a nice vacation home the drug wat has not extended there. I visited there last December loved the city and loved the people there

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    6. @6:05PM I have lived in Mexico for the last 21 years and have been a member of BB since 2010. An Administrator on the Forum and Main page for many of those years so I am familiar with all the numbers and all the horrific violence that goes on in parts of Mexico. The US State Dept. travel warnings give a pretty good indication where those are.

      But in my 20+ years living here I have never seen a dead body, a body hanging from a bridge, a mutilated or dismembered body. I've not even seen any acts of violence. that is not to say it hasn't occurred here but I haven't heard of it and it doesn't affect tge average resident. I only know of 2 murders this year and both of those were robbery related and I think done by local thugs you would find in any city. And I live in a mid to small city in Northern Mexico that is in the middle of a cartel controlled area. My biggest gripe is Mexican drivers. They don't have to take a driving test to get a license, they tailgate, don't lower their highbeam when you meet them, and they think traffic signals are suggestions. Reminds me of driving in Houston and LA.
      My advice is do some research on the area you want to live, maybe rent for couple of months to see if you like it and then use your common sense when you move there.

      Delete
    7. Thank you for some insightful replies. If we did make the move there I would love to try and become a local and contribute to my community. California is a pressure cooker waiting for the lid to blow off. Crime is everywhere, I live in a nice area of Long Beach and we have kids breaking into my cars, stealing shit from my garage and homeless people everywhere. We like to walk to the local coffee shop on the weekends and my kids scooter along side and there’s syringes laying on the ground and trash and human shit on the sidewalks. I hate when people compare all of Mexico’s murder rate to US. Mexico is large, it obviously has issues but I know lots of Americans buying and or retiring there in the nicer communities and states. US has states/cities I wouldn’t step foot in so I’m sure it’s a common sense thing, I won’t walk around town with my Rolex if I’m going surfing. Just be a nice person and trouble won’t find you. Thanks for participating BB crew!

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  6. I was thinking of visting sinaloa with my girl to see her family the times we went it was pretty calm i did saw a couple of sicarios but they dint mess with us at all but now i dont know i heard there is a lion vs lion war so Will stay out there for Now because the gallos están alebrestados

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    Replies
    1. Its not safe not sinaloa or any place. All stupid ppl cross the border at your own risk if you end up fucked up it was your stupidity that got you killed.

      Delete
  7. Quite an argument for the wall I'd say.

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  8. Nephew of tamaulipas governor busted with almost a mill in a jet from s.a. to monterrey. A million a week flown into mexico. Thats one way the cdg gets its money accross.

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    1. 8:11 pray thanks for the good news, EVEN IF THEY ARE FAKE...
      --Tejas born governor of tamaulipazzz francisca Javier garcia cabeza de cagadas de vacas has it coming, heheheee,
      pinchi judas traidor y culero.

      Delete
  9. Mexico has the murder measles.

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  10. me siento mas agusto y seguro en culiacan..que en ningun otro lado JAGL.

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  11. Damn i going on vacation in a f......war zone.
    All my my would like to See destinations got at least 3 point.i Hope its cooling down during next weeks

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  12. Tijuana is safe, they shall travel and not be afraid of kidnappings or being beheaded.

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  13. I wonder why the USA government does not issue travel warnings for most all of the bigger cities. Dallas, Houston,Austin, San Antonio, And any border city.Not just the State of Texas but any other State and in most cities that have a population of 100,000 or more there are areas that you just do not go into.
    This is because of the rampant Drug use that is all over the USA. If the government there would build a WALL along the California BORDER and move all the Druggies there,let them have an completely open border it would solve a lot of problems on both sides of the Border.

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    1. Cus in usa cities if you dont want to get killed stay the fuck out the ghetto. In mexico you might get killed at any time in any place

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    2. They the US has its share of murders but is a long way from the lawlessness and 250,000 murders that have occurred in Mexico over the last ten or twelve years...in the US the police will tell you what areas to avoid, in Mexico the police are part of the problem...

      GC

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  14. The press in many areas of Mexico, especially thrust areas is tightly controlled by the Cartels. Not sure how US stAte dept. Gets its information, but the level of crime may be worse than they are aware. Example, there is significant crime in puerto penasco, sonora, a tourist area. It goes unpublished, cause the Cartel controls the press there and loves to sell drugs to the turists, so its always good news being published.

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  15. Basically this says, "if you are American, stay out of Mexico."

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    1. Nope you got it wrong...the advisory is for federal American employees.

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  16. I love Mexico and am married to a Mexican woman but I won't travel there again. I can't represent fully to my family the trip would be completely safe. This year we will make our vacation in British Columbia, Victoria specifically.

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    1. Ahh Victoria b e a utifull ! And white as fk. No problems there.
      Stay away from Surrey BC though, piec of shit city, 90% meth heads 10% crack whores.

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  17. Keep killing yourself all your doing is killing years of generations. No mas las mujeres quedan

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    1. No they killed plenty of women too.

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    2. 10:27 is this a rethorical question?

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  18. interesting video, balanced point of view on illegal and legal immigration from Mexico, and its connection to violence

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SPvqI_lylk
    The Tragic Lifecycle of Mexican Immigration

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  19. Hola Yaqui and muchas gracias por el enlace.
    This guy has done great work, also his blog is very interesting.
    So data is available, next step is to force gob. into action and fight crime.

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  20. I think theyre down playing the danger in GTO. I have lived in San Miguel for my whole life. And I won't even make the drive 30 minutes to Celaya at night any more. Fuck, I dont even like go party downtown anymore and drive back to la colonia.

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    1. Party at your house only, you bring the Vodka and I will bring the ladies. They will have to sleepover, too many criminals rule the night.

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  21. Quite a few of my friends here in Dublin, Ireland, have holidayed in Cancun, quite oblivious to any violence that has Mexico in a grip of fear. None of them check this site out and believe me to be exaggerating the bloodshed and horror that happens on a daily basis. They always enjoy Cancun but because i have been a reader on here for quite a long time i can honestly say i will never set foot on Mexico's soil. I feel sorry for the milions of good Mexicans to have to live with that fear and anxiety because of how bloodthirsty many states have become.

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    1. I know crime happens everywhere, but I went to beautiful Ireland last year to see the birthplace of my great grandparents. I left some money on the exchange counter and it was returned to me, I didn't drive that well, and couldn't understand anyone from Dublin. They saw to it that I did not get too lost and served me tea everywhere I went. I love your beautiful country.

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    2. 2:10 Ireland had their own TROUBLES, and survived, with many American Liberals supporting the IRA against the British conservatives supported by American oligarchs and the extreme right. That was easy, there is almost nothing to steal from Ireland other than a few red heads with English teeth.

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    3. To 4.54, thank you, Ireland is indeed a beautiful country. I meet a few Mexicans as i work as i taxi driver and they are always pleasantly surprised when they realise how much i know about their country, albeit from reading borderland beat. I always find Mexicans to be lovely people.

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    4. 8.36, red heads are an endangered species these days in Ireland. Yes we have had our troubles in the past, especially in Northern Ireland, but Dublin and the Republic is very safe and quite prosperous with close to full employment. It's not a bad place to live really.

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  22. every other month a restriction jajaj.. let the uninformed dummies travel. its 2018. everybody should know what is going on in Mexico. Survival of the informed. what i find funny is many paisanos no quieren escuchar la verdad de la sangre que corre en sus pueblos. Pretend it doesnt happen. estan mas enterados en las novelas. dummies

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  23. If you're going to visit Mexico with a make America great again hat you can expect to become a victim. Other than that stay in the tourist areas, mind your business, don't be flashy & you won't have any problems.
    Viva y deja vivir

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  24. Says places not to go. But are there any safe places in Mexico?

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  25. I feel sorry for those who come on this site and have never set foot in Mexico.

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