Saturday, July 28, 2018

Municipalities in Morelos Establish Their Own Autodefensas



Translated by Valor for Borderland Beat

The first six months of 2018 became the most violent so far for the Enrique Peña Nieto administration.  From January to June of this year, there were 13,738 murders.  This figure meant that, on average, 76.32 daily homicides were committed in the country, according to the data of the Secretariado Ejecutivo del Sistema Nacional de Seguridad Pública (SESNSP) (Executive Secretariat of the National Public Security) with a cutoff date of June 2018.

Fed up with this type of violence, kidnappings, extortion from organized crime, and the lack of response from authorities, residents of Tlalnepantla, Yautepec and Atlatlahucan decided to form their own autodefensas.

Mexico City, July 20, 2018— Residents of Tlalnepantla, Yautepec and Atlatlahucan, Morelos announced the creation of autodefensas in order to confront violence, kidnappings, and extortion from organized crime.

“Many (criminal) cells arrived to charge quotas and to kidnap,” a member of this community police that maintains a checkpoint at the entrance to the municipality of Tlalnepantla told EFE.

Fed up with this type of attack and the lack of response from the authorities, the Morelenses decided to form a community police, he explained. 


In this municipality of Morelos, most of the population is dedicated to the sowing and cultivation of nopal (cactus), avocado, and peach.

“The police and the municipal mayor are already on their side (of the criminals).  In fact, we no longer believe in them and we decided amongst ourselves to unite, to represent ourselves and to support each other,” he added.

The group was created after criminals of Colombian origin were arrested a month ago by villagers who accused them of extorting storekeepers in this region of central Mexico, he said.

Regularly, a man or a woman would appear at their businesses on board a motorcycle to request a quota from them, according to testimonies from the villagers.

“They told us they were charging money and threatening people.  We realized this because people began to inform us and that is why we do this,” said the interviewee.

To achieve the arrest, the same villagers created barricades and placed checkpoints at the main entrances of the villages.

“We decided to get together in the town to get ahead, we came to look after [the village] (in turns) and we are armed for any situation that arises,” he said.

In addition to this “community police” in Morelos, the so-called autodefensas exist in the state of Michoacán and Guerrero, where they were born as a result of the threat of organized crime.

In Michoacán, they emerged in 2013 to defend themselves against the Caballeros Templarios Cartel, a spin-off from the Familia Michoacana, that dedicated itself mainly to the production and trafficking of drugs, but also kidnapping and extortion.

Although since 2011, there were already some armed communities in Cherán, Michoacán.

The emergence of autodefensas is not unique to that region.  In Guerrero, they were born in the 70s and new groups emerged since 2013 due to the increase in violence.

Meanwhile in the Mezquital Valley (Hidalgo), they exist since 2008, and in villages that sympathize with the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) in Chiapas, since 1994.


The First Six Months, The Most Violent

The first six months of 2018 became the most violent so far for the Enrique Peña Nieto administration.  From January to June of this year, there were 13,738 murders.  This figure meant that, on average, 76.32 homicides were committed daily in the country, according to the data.

Last June, there were 2,294 investigation cases for this type of crime. 

During the first six months of 2017, 11,940 investigation cases were registered for homicides in the country, which meant an average of 66.3 per day.  Last year closed with a total of 24,893 intentional homicides.

From January to June 2016, 9,298 intentional homicides were committed, an average of 51.6 a day.  That year closed with 20,547 homicides.

During the first six months of 2015, 8,088 homicides were committed, on average: 44.9 per day.  The year closed with 16,909 homicides.

Source: Sin Embargo

20 comments:

  1. What a coincidence, cjng is in morelos

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    1. Time to kill them, Autodefensas let's kill those rats.

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  2. I hope these autodefensas dont become a cartel later

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    1. From someone who was born in Texas and lived more than 10 years in Mexico, married to a Mexican woman and with children born in Mexico. The majority of the people in Mexico are good people not looking to take advantage of others like the few people (political officials "especially politicians", and criminals) who take it upon themselves to rape, steal and kill
      the good people of Mexico who only want to have the opportunity of living in peace among others! If they go "criminal" it will only to be so that they can extract revenge for the loved ones that they lost to the true criminal elements that are causing harm to these local populations!

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    2. Very good explanation

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    3. 1:12. Agree. I’ve been in Mexico all my life but I’ve been in US Federal Prison system. From Culiacán to Guadalajara people don’t give a fuck about what we sell in the USA because your money has made a much bigger middle class in most of the big cities and resort areas. What we will not allow is stealing from the Mexican people who are our allies when we don’t bother them. The BLO allowed their people to start this in Acapulco even through all 3 brothers were making millions USD every week. Same in Guerrero, Nayarit, and everywhere in Mexico - people don’t care if dope goes north and people willing buy; but ALWAYS EVENTUALLY those who extort and kidnap will eventually fall and it is usually at direction of the real narcos in Mexico; CDS.

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    4. CDs extorts in chihuahua....

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  3. Best thing that needs to happen, autodefensas since the government, can only do a little. My AR-15 with a scope, will help keep those ruthless killers.

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    1. Oh thank you, I am sorry to say but I have to kick azz, with my fellow compadres, they are slaughtering our people, like if we are animals, we have to finish, these criminals invading our town. We cant trust the police, they work together with the bad guys.

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    2. Yep becarefull it's. Only your town people, CJNG is known to infitrate, into Autodefensas, and kill.

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  5. A major issue about these autodefensas is that eventually a few of them become cartels themselves. Time will tell.

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    1. that is a minor issue,,,those that are narcos go in being nacos with a plan to infiltrate and disrupt. AD have been around for over a hundred years in a third of Mexico.

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    2. El Cuauh running for governor may put murdering mother faker Graco Ramirez in prison, the governor is an admirer of Francisco Franco like the Pinochet Gang of golpista Chilean military and must be making millions from his state police crimes.

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  6. Courageous! I pray for them.
    Mexico-Watcher

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  7. No. Yall know the cjng tricks people into autodefensas with budget and operators and once the rivals are out cjng tells the gov to disarm the autodefensas and they take over. Fuck all cartels

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  8. Autodefensas en nayarit going into action against cjng

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  9. Autodefensas are a positive step in my opinion. In order to survive one must keep a super low profile or end up 'aligned' in some way with the current cartel in your village. When the next cartel comes along/takes the plaza you are then 'person non grata' and must flee or somehow 'realign'. So, autdefensas will always have some 'bad people', but in the minimum the local community should have the say for who can come and go. Still, rather un-nerving to have to stop with a group of teenagers in bandana's and guns to explain who you are and what you are doing. At least they claim to want the 'high road' and not to...

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  10. Whatever happened to the ADs in Guadalajara??

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    1. They are taking over mexico its called cjng

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