Friday, December 22, 2017

Cartel Hunts Cops Accused of a ‘Massacre’ in Mexico

Posted by DD Republished from the Daily Beast

Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast

Mexico’s Jalisco New Generation Cartel put a price on the heads of police officers accused of killing women and children and allegedly attempting to cover up the crime.

By Jeremy Kryt

In the central Mexican state of Morelos on Thursday, Nov. 30, a raid by state police left four women, an infant, and a teenage boy dead. And since then Mexico’s fastest growing drug cartel has been out for blood.

The officers involved claim the deceased were “caught in a crossfire” during a shootout at their residence in the town of Temixco, about three miles south of Cuernavaca, a popular tourist destination.

But the crossfire theory has been contradicted by eyewitness testimony and and by forensic evidence. The half-dozen victims were found huddled on the bathroom floor and appear to have been killed execution style. At least three bodies were found with a single 9mm bullet to the head, according to the family lawyer. Investigators also charge that the police officers falsified evidence in the case, such as planting bogus firearms near the bodies.



The target of the raid was José Valdez Chapa, aka “El Señor de la V” (“The Lord of the V”). Valdez allegedly has been linked to several criminal organizations, including Los Rojos (The Reds), the Southern Cartel, and the ascendant Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG).

Those killed during the operation were all Valdez’s immediate family, including his wife, mother, sister, cousin, 2-month-old niece, and 14-year-old nephew. They were celebrating the baptism of the youngest child when police stormed the apartment building.

Valdez and six others surrendered to authorities during the raid. However, over the next few days all the suspects were freed, with the presiding judge citing “inconsistencies” in police reports and in the results of field ballistic tests.


Upon his release, The Lord of the V was met by a convoy of 10 trucks bearing some 40 men, as reported by Mexico’s Milenio newspaper. Standing before the courthouse, Valdez promised vengeance against those officials from the Morelos State Commission for Public Security responsible for the alleged extrajudicial killings.
“For every drop of blood spilled from my family [there] will be a liter of blood spilled from yours,” Valdez vowed before climbing aboard one of the trucks and speeding off.
“Perfect Lethality”
Valdez wasn’t alone in his outrage over the bloodshed of innocents and charges of police corruption. The “massacre” quickly led to street protests in Temixco, with marchers carrying signs demanding the accused officers be brought to justice.

The family’s lawyer has accused authorities of “fabricating” a crime scene, and forensics indicate the weapons planted on the bodies of the slain women had not been fired by them. In fact, investigators indicate that police officers were the only ones to have discharged weapons during the raid, and that their claims of “repelling” an attack were faked.

A survivor of the assault said that officers “came in shooting,” and promised “that they were going to kill everyone.” Based on preliminary evidence, Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission has promised to take up the case, although such scrutiny carries little official weight.


Morelos Police Commissioner Alberto Capella already has walked back his initial promise to undertake an internal investigation. Capella now refuses to release the names of the officers involved and is sticking to the “crossfire” story despite evidence to the contrary.
“For every drop of blood spilled from my family [there] will be a liter of blood spilled from yours.”
— José Valdez Chapa, aka “El Señor de la V” (“The Lord of the V”)

“These cases are all too common in Mexico,” says Laura Carlsen, director of the Mexico-based Americas Project, in an interview with The Daily Beast. “There’s even a category for it with the macabre title of ‘perfect lethality.’”

That’s when “the people on just one side are killed and there are no wounded. This doesn’t happen in a shootout—in real life, in a typical shootout, you have about an equal killed-to-wounded ratio,” Carlsen said. Perfect lethality only “happens in an execution.”

Extrajudicial killings like those in Temixco are “part of the strategy and a standard practice of the police and armed forces here,” Carlson says. A 2016 analysis by the United Nations also highlighted the “lack of accountability” behind such frequent executions in Mexico.

“Trust in the police and justice system [is] at desperately low levels among the public,” says Duncan Wood, a Latin American specialist with the Woodrow Wilson Center.
Wood also agrees with Carlsen that the narrative offered by Morelos state authorities in the Temixco shootings seems implausible:

“With ample evidence to show that police have repeatedly failed to use effective investigative tools and procedures, there is every reason to be skeptical of the official version of events,” says Wood.
Until an independent investigation takes place, he adds, “serious doubts will continue to be raised about police actions.”

V for “Vendetta”

José “El Señor de la V” Valdez was last seen threatening the Morelos state police and promising blood for blood. But his enemies are also out for vengeance.

In December of 2015, another shootout occurred in Morelos, this time in an upscale neighborhood of Cuernavaca. The Lord of the V escaped, but Valdez’s younger brother Óscar was killed in the gun battle—and so was one of the cops.

Observers say the slaughter of the Valdez clan in Temixco was likely meant as payback for the dead officer.

“This case apparently shows a bloody vendetta in a context of impunity such that security forces didn’t think twice about massacring an entire family,” Carlsen says. “Mexico is dangerously close to a state where police and armed forces have in practice carte blanche powers, with no consequences for crimes and human rights violations.”

But if corrupt cops might have little reason to fear legal repercussions in Mexico, they can still be subject to the law of the streets.

A week after events in Temixco, the fearsome CJNG put up signs along a highway in Morelos offering a 100,000 peso reward (about $5,000) for the heads of Commissioner Capella and several other police chiefs and commanders linked to the Valdez case.

By far the most powerful of the crime groups with which Valdez has been associated, the involvement of the CJNG dramatically increases the chances that Lord V will act on his promise to spill “liters” of blood in his quest for revenge.

“CJNG is now the largest cartel in Mexico. They’re always looking for ways to expand their territory, and Morelos is no exception,” says Emmanuel Gallardo, an independent journalist in Mexico City. He explains that bounties on the officers are a way to “pressure and intimidate” authorities into compliance with the cartel.

“This is just more proof that Mexican authorities are incapable of providing security to citizens,” says Gallardo, who characterizes police in Morelos as “corrupt to the core.”

Americas Project Director Carlsen takes heart, however, from the response generated by grassroots demonstrations and NGOs alike:

“The fact that there are protests and investigation of the [Temixco] massacre as a crime against humanity is encouraging,” she says. “If there is enough outrage and organization, the hope is that it can crack the impunity”—and in the process thwart the law of the street.

51 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Ya thats rich comin from the guyz who strap bombs to little kids. What a mess.

      Delete
  2. The bounty has to be simply propaganda to garner public support.

    CJNG is well large enough to go out and hunt down these people themselves, no?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 11:14 NO, like all the other dangerous mexican cartels, the cjng has always depended on the kindness of strangers ( a street car named desire) and we know the Mexican government is some of the crudest Stanley Kowalskis in the world, after all they got backed up by the crudest police on the world, the US, their weapons, and billions and billions of dollars, loaded with sovereign impunity for icing on the cake...

      Delete
  3. No need to glorify these cartel scum. Yes police acted wrongly but this guy is a piece of work. While his family reaped the rewards of his trade and blindly accepted his illicit profits, tgere are no gains for a police official's family.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Corrupt police have family's that also reap the same rewards as the family's of the narcos.

      Delete
  4. Cannot remember who said it in Zeta horse racimg trial: in Mexico the polesia is a cartel with a badge on.

    Assuming/believing this to be wholly true the question is for which cartel do these officers work? CDG perhaps?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Morelos is on the gulf of Mexico? Didn't know that.

      Delete
    2. I don’t believe the officers work for a certain cartel tbh. Most of the officers have lost good friends fighting the war on drugs and they release all the frustration on the families and friends of the cartel members. Granted it doesn’t give them the right to hurt inoccent people just for the hell of it but that’s just my thoughts about this whole thing

      Delete
    3. Municipal police 100 percent with whoever owns the plaza
      State police a mic bag depending who operates whever they are stationed.
      Federal police are corrupt at the top level at best price. Mencho is good at procuring them where he needs. but as a force they are most reliable. marina the best. army sucks.

      this applies in the narco plazas and routes

      Delete
    4. Chivis, any idea who currently owns Moreles and the Temixco plaza? I know it was ABL for a long time but what about these days? I assume it’s CJNG in Cuernavaca?

      Delete
    5. It might be that cops work with a cartel or at the very least allow the cartel in charge to operate without much interference but this does not explain why innocents are targeted by cops. A far more plausable cause is that cops in Mexico and in most of South America for that matter for their own growth within their individual police departments have a "kill to advance" policy. What that means is that in order for cops to move up to leadership positions within the departments they have to have a confirmed kill or taking of a human life.
      They may act like saints but this is far from it.

      Delete
    6. That's a really interesting observation Chivis Narco 101!

      Delete
    7. as of a couple months ago it was GU and Rojos with CJNG having a presence.

      Delete
    8. Governor Graco Ramirez is not asking for the resignation of the Secretary of Public Security of the state of Morelos bossman of the Mando Unico that has been fighting like a bitch for the exclusive command and commission, Alberto Capella Ibarra, whose Mando Unico accumulated HUNDREDS OF COMPLAINTS.
      "Mando Unico de Morelos acumula cientos de denuncias"
      Los Angeles Press, by Arturo Leon Hidalgo 3 Feb 2016

      Delete
    9. All the poles is work with all the narcos to "infiltrate them and extort, murder, eliminate etc. later on, the "plazas" are always on sale, like rat traps, and they do trap the narcos sooner or later, but the mexican narco-government is always on the take, they don't do the bribe taking well anymore, it is forced now, and the criminals are free to battle it out as they see fit.

      Delete
  5. Jeremy Kryt did it again !
    Thanks DD

    ReplyDelete
  6. The humble callentos (corn hobbled)of yesterday who were happy to get some coffee with piquete (alcohol) in the mornings or a torta and a soda for lunch at noon for free, do not exist anymore.
    These days they use their heavy weaponry and expert training to rob and murder at pleasure.
    Perhaps Julian Leyzaola has some knowledge and explain why, he left Morelos to go on his fishy expedition where he.got his assistant shot up before running back to the BC where he keeps trying to form his new wheel chaired
    empire...
    Anyway, El Señor de la V will have to go for the head, Capella is the one in charge and his cuicos would not have gone for it without his orders, luckily they were too busy defending their assault for 4 hours until all the witnesses made it impossible to kill everybody in the house for reals,

    ReplyDelete
  7. Why didn't they kill V when they had the chance?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lmao!so what's cjng trying to prove???they kill,rape and pillage like all the rest.and the Mexican government is no better a bunch of opportunist!!!

      Delete
    2. Yea. That's a good point. Why not kill the actual members , instead the family? They must have know that would be a death warrant.

      Delete
    3. That would have been the perfect solution!
      Now all municipal officials in that area have resorted to fleeing for fear of reprisals. Creating the perfect gift for this cartel to impose their objectives in that region.
      Since no municipal law enforcement will be present!

      E42

      Delete
    4. 2:18 El Señor de la V was not home, his wife communicated with him by phone, by the time he arrived and was arrested her phone was still on, but she was dead. The assailant polesias were too busy looking for loot and planting evidence and could not search for other people in the house, by the time they found them, many people were watching.
      These ambushes to the polesias where all the drug trafficking sicarios get killed before even acquiring a gun, or a permit for a minor aged 3 months old, are getting extremely false and prefabricated and keep getting worse all the time.
      I wish the best to El Señor de la V, he has been aggraviated.

      Delete
  8. This is fucking great. If the weak ass corrupt ass mexican goverment cant make their law officials responsable for their actions. The cartels will. Say what u want about the shit but the families did not have to get killed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mex gov aint weak!

      The officials are corrupt and filling their pockets, but they are 100% in charge. Reality is that any and every cartel has to pay to play!

      Remember: the Mex gov has the support of the US gov in the back and will never fail.

      Delete
    2. 3:45 the Mexican government to is a whole bunch of RATS and the US government does not just support them, it feeds them behind the backs of the American people, forget about hearings on Mexican corruption under present US politicians and narco-businessmen...

      Delete
  9. Its his fault tho why he run inside the house knowing he was putting his family in danger.... Fcking pussy he thought probably that with his family there he would be safe Smh .... His fault I'll say again... Fck the policia too lol

    ReplyDelete
  10. Why would a cartel offer a bounty when they already have gunmen and especially something shitty as 5000$? If i was an already active up-and-comer i wouldn't bother with that lame shit and if i wasn't i wouldn't be taking my first step into criminality for that chumpchange either!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But think of the many who value life so little?
      Probably an opportunity to earn some money for the holidays! Desperate times call for desperate measures for those unfortunate and ignorant!

      E42

      Delete
    2. They offer the bounty so the gunmen got work to do. And for some reason I would think being the guy to pull that (what you call it?) lame ass shit? (Killin a cop?) would just be for bragging rights, or gunman of the week. A couple extra bjs etc.

      You call it a dead cop, I call it a bloody pig

      Delete
  11. The cartel cjng the ones who strapped bombs to 10 year old kids and kill innocent people. want to kill cops who where doing their job and you have trash who support that scum smh

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. “Oh noooo y ahora quien podrá ayudarnos?” Pareces del PRI

      Delete
    2. 7:35 militarizing the mexican police is not the right solution to anything.
      Cd Juarez had about 150 murders per year before THE FECAL president sent his melitares to start his wars on drugs, then:
      2007 900 murders
      2008 1800 murders
      2009 2300 murders
      2010 2800 murders
      2011 3300 murders
      Shakedowns, extortions, kidnappings for ransom, tortures, fabrication of delinquents, were innumerable, FECAL had to take his shit out of Cd Juarez, by then "El Capulina" governor Cesar Duarte had earned the governorship and his impunity by helping the narcopriista army burn the PAN governors and fecal presidente, he was EPN'S BOY IN CHIHUAHUA like MAO osorio chon on hidalgo and all the other narco-governors of mexico, he has now given the melitry the contract on all of Mexico as the polesia, "a job they were not prepared for, or are trained on and can not do" in the words of giniral Salvador Cienpedos, secretary of the defense, graduate of SCHOOL OF THE ASSASSINS.

      Delete
  12. This is an interesting story, maybe the only cartel story where I find myself on the cartels side. Which doesn’t mean much as the police are likely corrupt but if it was my family...his wife, his mother, sister plus the young kids....goodness me, I’m sure it happens all the time in Mexico but that is a line far crossed, a 2 month old????

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 8:19 those mexican sicarios and trafficking drug dealers are getting started younger and younger all the time.
      Thanks for your observation...

      Delete
  13. The witching hour has arrived. It’s time to hit the streets! - Sol Prendido

    ReplyDelete
  14. Bravo cops. You gotta fight evil with evil; you mean to tell me it’s ok for this v bastard to run around killing women and children but when the same medicine is dealt to him it’s all boo hoo whoa is me... get the fuck out of here. It’s easy to run around when the rules don’t apply to you, regardless of his “promise of liters”, this asshole now knows what the average citizen getting killed innocently by his thugs feels, and I for one say KEEP DOING GODS WORK COPS wipe these clowns off the face of the earth

    ReplyDelete
  15. I personally don't see any difference between the police in Mexico and the police in the US as the arbitrary use of violence goes. The Mexican police go in a bathroom and execute innocent women and children, and in the US a useless pig in Arizona executes an unarmed man crawling to him begging for his life. People should not be shocked that this day en age cop's are just as violent and evil as those they "claim" to be going after.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That Arizona cop did overkill with all those shots. One round at his foot would’ve been sufficient just to get him to comply. And for the Texan it would’ve been better that the world see him crawling naked versus ending up dead. I’ll still blame the cop for not showing more restraint though. - Sol Prendido

      Delete
    2. The only diff is USA cops sometimes have body cameras show the real story

      Delete
    3. Arguably the dumbest words ever spoken on this board. Can you truly not discern the difference between the two?

      Delete
    4. You sound like an idiot bleeding heart Liberal. Go post on CNN

      Delete
    5. There is no way in hell you are going to make a comparison about anything pertinent to life in Mexico and life in the US and not hear shit about it, especially as it relates to law enforcement. There is no fucking way. That asinine comparison proves you’ve never been in Mexico when shit is the hitting the fan. Enjoy the freedoms awarded to you along with living in the US.

      Delete
    6. For a lot of police wrongdoing on the US, see the young turks, there are cases 70 years old where people wrongfully convicted and executed were exhonerated, 70 years!
      And regrettably, there are reports of some newly acquitted wrongfully convicted people that were eared afterm 3p years in prison at the time the report was made in 2015, it may be a coincidence that most of them were black people, convicted by the "unliberal".....no mames güey...

      Delete
    7. US Police the same as Mexican police? lmaooo What a moron, clearly never been to Mexico.

      Delete
  16. Should have included Valdez and his henchmen in the massacre. Scorched earth is the only way to deal with scum.Judges, police etc are all corrupt. If your daddy and mommy are criminals,you are enjoying the spoils

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 6:04 that poppy and that mommy includes yours, because esos hijos de su rechingada Madre questions pasan por polesias are just a bunch of murdering assassin's at the service of the politicians in charge a day their supreme commander Capella Has a very lengthy record of abuses, murders, extortion and failures as a police commander since he was in tijuana, where former Mexican army lt col Julian Leyzaola had his ass repeatedly...
      --Google "El Rambo de Tijuana"

      Delete
  17. It’s a cut and paste story nobody in that corrupt cesspool,ever questions....”police were on patrol and fired upon, police repel the aggression killing those involved”, nevermind pictures of the dead all had a headshot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 7:56 BUT, BUT, "SOME OF THE SHOOTERS WERE GOOD PEEPOL"
      they shot without malice in their heart, don't judge...

      Delete
  18. So the police played by cartel rules. So what. Every cartel wheel should fear for his family, just like every cop fears for the safety of HIS family.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com