Friday, November 21, 2014

Another principal suspect captured in the Iguala Normalista case

Chivis Martinez Borderland Beat

In Colima, the Federal Police captured Cesar Nava González, former deputy director of Public Safety Cocula and considered one of the principals involved in the disappearance of the 43 normalistas Ayotzinapa on  September 26th

He was considered Iguala Mayor Abraca’s right hand man.

Nava was wanted on an arrest warrant issued by the First District Judge in Criminal Proceedings of Matamoros, Tamaulipas, on charges of organized crime and kidnapping in the criminal case resulting in the disappearance, and assumed murder of 43 Normalista (students) of Ayotzinapa.

Nava is accused of being paid 13,000 pesos per month by the Guerreros Unidos as protection money. 
He is charged with being responsible of delivering the students to the ranch of Gildardo López Astudillo alias, “El Gil” of Guerreros Unidos, who was in charge of the students execution.  

After delivering the students to El Gil, Nava fled the city and was not seen again until his capture last Sunday.

The former police commander was captured with his wife last Sunday in Colima, but the announcement was not made public until today.  Authorities first notified the parents of the missing students at a meeting held in Chilpancingo.  

Outside the meeting, frustrated parents threw water bottles at van carrying  the PGR director of the Criminal Investigation Agency Thomas Zerón, and officer Jaime Ramos Rivera.  Two  bottles hit the vehicle.

The incident caused no damage, but it was enough to frighten the General Commissioner of the Federal Police, Enrique Galindo.  After  being notified of the bottle incident, the general decided to wait until the parents left before leaving in his SUV.

The General  managed a death-defying escape  safely exiting  the garage, and avoiding the lethal plastic water bottles.

28 comments:

  1. This SOB prostituted himself to Guerreros Unidos for less than $950 U.S. dollars a month. He sold his soul and turned against the weakest segment of the Mexican population at the exact moment when the disenfranchised needed him to fulfill his sworn duties as a police commander. For $13,000 Mexican pesos a month he readily delivered 43 human beings to "el diablo" who summarily had them executed one at a time. All because they were born into poverty and refused to accept their family's lack of social standing. Instead, they used their circumstances as an impetus to better themselves by seeking a rudimentary education to qualify for teaching positions.
    The circumstances surrounding the murder of the students combined with the initial reaction or lack thereof by Mexico's president and his administration, demonstrates the continued abject failure of this nation's political leaders to recognize and prioritize the issues affecting this country. President Peña Nieto has concentrated the majority of his efforts on improving Mexico's economy, modifying their laws to allow foreign firms to venture into their oil fields and now the telecommunications industry. He concentrates in these arenas while reporters are murdered, residents kidnapped at alarming rates and crime continues to increase. He ignores a corrupt criminal justice system where judges are bought off, federal attorneys refuse to investigate serious criminal acts by referring to them as a state issue and the populace has absolutely no confidence in the police.
    The only accomplishment that he has succeeded in establishing is to reduce how much it costs to bribe a Mexican cop to deliver an innocent student into the hands of their executioner. The price is now $22.06 US dollars per person. I hope that you are happy you stupid son of a bitch!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You missed the number by the 300 bodies they have found in and around iguala. So his 950 a month or 12000 a year divided by the 343 fosa bodies comes to about 35 per person delivered and killed. Other than that i agree 100%

      Delete
    2. EPN is a replay of Salinas de Gortari. Mark my words. By the end of his sexenio he will have handed over much of the country's wealth and resources to foreign bankers and degraded the living standards of the average person. EPN is a disgusting traitor.

      Delete
    3. $950 USD/mo is a hella lot of money in Mexico. But no amount should make a person sworn to protect help kill students, the poor, the destitute, the honest, hardworkers, your countrymen. And for what are you doing such evil? For some bling?

      Delete
  2. nice guy he is like our Sheriff in South Texas {Edinburg Texas}

    ReplyDelete
  3. "The General managed a death-defying escape and safely exited the garage, avoiding the lethal plastic water bottle".

    Classic lol haha made my morning lol . Anyways good thing they caught him!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I believe that similar with this other case in Mexico, normalistas will fade from the memory of citizen. EPN will avoid to addressing these problem until his people have find other thing to think about, and they will quietly release this men involved. I believe because it have happen too many time in Mexico before.

    ReplyDelete
  5. "The General  managed a death-defying escape and safely exited the garage,avoiding the lethal plastic water bottles." Lol !!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Last line I had to read twice, so damn funny.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This sherrif and arpaio from arizona are very alike.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trevino yes but you are very wrong on arpio and let your bias for arpio doing his job get the better of you. Trevinio is a proven felon. Arpio will retire with his honor intact.

      Delete
  8. Thank you! this style is MUCH more readable!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Why was the arrest warrant issued in Matamoros, Tamp.?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Because he was moving product through a Golfo or Zeta route that collected his piso and someone in Los Golfos or Zetas gave info On him to either protect themselves, or to give a bust to the authorities.

      Delete
  10. Enrique francisco galindo ceballos, SSP chief, San Luis Potosi, zeta from the start, left his boy in charge of michoacan, trains "his" polecia nazional in france, used to kill his own SSP commanders in SLP, failed the confiability examinations, he is no "general"
    --EMILIO CHUAYFFET CHENDRAUI, secretary of education, at war with the normal rurales, had the massacre of ACTEAL carried out for him under president zedillo, and had to resign over it to save zedillo's jundillo...
    --Sub-comandante marcos said: "we know emilio chuayffet, we know what to expect" when chuayffet was appointed, he was right as usual...
    --the much denied hand of klaus barbie, nazi escapee, protegee of henry kissinger, keeps showing all over latin america, he trained militaies and paramilitaries for pinochet, in chile, for argentina, for bolivia, guatemala, honduras, el savador, and, surprise, mexico, all the worst murderers that have carried out massacres in mexico have been trained on US schools of the assassins, mario arturo acosta chaparro, to renan to rios montt...
    Now we have to make a list of their secret but not so secret massacres, starting at the hall of fame of the school of the americas, meanwhile, let's keep an eye on the butcher of Acteal, the butcher of Atenco, the butchers of Tlatlaya, the butchers of Aguas Blancas
    The butchers of Tlaltelolco, etc etc etc..
    --i'm still waiting for emilio chuayffet's resignation, over his expected massacre of Ayotzinapa that he has delivered, the butcher of Acteal delivers, death, and no proof of his guilt this time, just one faceless carcass to scare the rest into toeing chuayffet's line, and many fall guys that will pay for being his puppets, marcos said chuayffet had been training his henchmen on the UNAM, where he was hiding since he saved zedillo's jundillo in 1994, or so, 20 years later, the postman calls again, as expected...

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hasta la Madre de Protestas PuñeterasNovember 22, 2014 at 2:27 PM

    I'm upset and pissed too, but here's a question I haven't seen thrown out there at all, Given the mass killings all over the north throughout Felipe Calderon's reign (60 younger students in Juarez, 300+ in San Fernando Parts 1 and 2, Tepic, +++ ad nauseam), and the fact that there are over 1100 bodies in the Tijuana morgue without identification just from one calendar year (according to a recent Frontera article), WHY ARE THESE 43 SO IMPORTANT?? There have been over 100,000 fallen since this whole debacle began, legions of them gone without a single trace. WHY ARE THESE 43 SO IMPORTANT?? If I'm gonna pick a hero or something to be outraged at, then it's the death of Don Alejo, or Miut3, not these 43.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The difference is the 43 were killed by the government whereas the others were killed by the cartels with killings you mention, people could delude themselves into thinking the government didn't act against the cartels out of fear....with the 43, they could no longer do that. The killing of 43 unmasked the monster

      Delete
    2. there is no difference, an atrocity is an atrocity. as chivis explains perfectly

      Delete
  12. I know where you are coming from. I get it, ok?

    But friend, this is not a contest, all those Atrocities that you have named are not of less importance than the 50 killed in Iguala on September 26-27th. I could add many other acts to your list of brutality against humanity of Mexico.

    But when we enter into a competition of ratings, of which grisly act is more deserving of attention, that dishonors all of the victims of Mexico and anywhere in the world.

    I have had comments come in saying what happens in Mexico is “nothing” in comparison to what happens in Africa, or Syria…..really? As caring humans do we really want to thread that path?

    When you discount the slaughter of 50 people, you fall on the side of the perpetrators.

    Do you really want to be on the side of evil? Do you know the Guerrero history? Iguala History?

    Are you aware that normalistas are killed on a regular basis by narcos and police? Do you know that in the town of Iguala, one of 120k population, at least 300 bodies have been found by residents in 2 years, and another couple hundred in fosas.

    Some people tell me I am wrong it is 1000. I do know that any person looking for a fosa in Iguala will discover one in a matter of an hour.

    I do know not one national or international press ever wrote about what was transpiring in Gro though the years, or the ongoing massacre of the poorest and indigenous peoples.

    So, while I agree one atrocity has no greater importance than another, I am pleased that, at least for this moment the world is saying, “we see, we acknowledge”.

    That has not happened, ever.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Dear mister punetero, the drop that spills the water is very important, as you can see on this case...
    --think, if Paul Revere had not gotten wind of the british are coming, MEXICO would still be waiting for Cura Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla 'el Coss' to yell 'let's go and kill gabachos!'...
    --i don't know where we went wrong, is it possible that ambassador joel poinsett invented mexico's history of the independence, like the pocahontas and the malinche?
    --for inventing his discovery of the nochebuena POINSETTIA on time for christmass...
    --Don't worry mr punetas we all do what we can in due time, meanwhile you can go back to what you do best, another one, con jabon...

    ReplyDelete
  14. We are going to miss your articles Chivis, if you do actually leave BB! Mexico owes alot to you!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks for the excellent reply Mr Chivis. I live in Tijuana, where the drug “war” has been going strong for quite some time. Cartels come and go, they squabble and negotiate amongst themselves, and they carve out this city time and again, all under the watchful eye--and I would argue tacit approval--of both US and Mexican authorities. So yes, I’m aware and I live this Mexican reality every day.
    I’m also aware of the appalling conditions in some southern states, with their feudal like power structures that severely limit speech and assembly and all the other goodies a paper “democracy” is supposed to give its citizens, including the right not be slaughtered by the state. But given our long history (and we don’t need to go too far back, the Guerra Sucia days are more than enough) where time and again the nail that stood out got hammered hard and for the most part disappeared, I find it difficult to understand why it’s so shocking to find out the state 86’s people who make a ruckus.
    Life is cheap in Mexico. I don’t like saying it, but it’s unfortunately true. Almost every single day for the last 10+ yrs I wake up to news of grizzly deaths in and around my city , for a while in 08 the shit got real bad, and it’s all coming back now. Even with the “pacification” they touted and tried to export to other cities (douchebag-extraordinaire “Rambo” Capella in Michoacan comes to mind, and douchebag Leyzaola comes in a close 2nd), piss-poor results ensued. Bodies don’t pile-up in such high counts as the GRO incident, but they still trickle steady and without interruption. After a while it’s difficult to gather the necessary muster to care. It’s almost akin to growing up here and hearing for the 10,000th time: “Jefito, me acaban de deportar, no tiene uno diez pesitos?” Not to sound cold, but after a while you just don’t give a shit anymore--on a side note, I always offer food and drink, but money, fuck that. CONTINUED

    ReplyDelete
  16. PART 2. I’m at a loss here. And I’m not trying to discount their deaths, I just don’t understand why these are more valuable than the rest. Why these lives are getting more attention than all the tens of thousands that fell before them. Why we aren’t making a big stink out of ALL the people being found in the numerous clandestine spots.
    As I stated, it seems to me that life doesn’t mean much in my country, nor explanations as to the whereabouts of your missing loved ones, nor does the semblance of a working justice system. I just don’t get what makes these killings so special, to the point now that it’s becoming fashionable (let’s put a hooddie on, or come out and some awards show with a t-shirt, next it’ll be a fucking ice-bucket with blood or something along those lines)
    And while it hasn’t been as pervasive as this last wave, I would argue there has been international attention to the plight of the poor and disenfranchised (Acteal got pretty decent coverage, and that was State-sponsored, the Zapatistas are everyone’s darling internationally, and recently the autodefensas movement got some decent coverage, of which THIS BLOG was a crucial instrument). But your assertion is correct, GRO does get neglected.
    I agree that it is of great benefit the world is looking our way, whether or not that translates into some type of motivation to spur change is a different matter. Experience has taught me that Mexico is impressively resistant to change. And now with close to half of the population using the internet in the least productive and most moronic-inducing way (FB, Twitter, Instagram, candy crush and all its buddies), with La Voz Mexico, with clasicos left and right (chivas, America, blah blah blah), Aguinaldo season, Dia de la virgen right around the corner, Casas Blancas and the like, I fear we will once again show how our collective attention span is equivalent to that of a gnat, and the cycle of ignorance, materialism, and impunity will continue, and alas, this massacre will have been but a hiccup.

    PS. The next one’s just for Mr. Anonymous without jabón, let me know where to send the specimen cup for your English style tea. Bottoms-up buddy.

    ReplyDelete
  17. what a great, thoughtful, in-depth reply!!!!! thank you.

    When the normalistas attacks on September 26th occurred we , as said, had a post up with fotos from FB from people on the ground within 8 hrs. NO ONE in the intl press had anything. I poked and prodded my journalists friends who I have become friendly with over the years '43 STUDENTS KILLED BY POLICE!!!WHERE IS THE INTERNATIONAL PRESS!!!" I screamed on social media.

    finally, over a week later the press rolled in, but they have not done justice to the story, and have skimmed the surface. truth is, they don't care. It is a job, and business to them. and that is the truth. Just like 95% of all Mexicans. they don't care either.

    as for the other atrocities. Honestly, it is a crap shoot. What story is picked up and which is left behind. But for the most part, anything to do with indigenous and impoverished is not going to be in Mexican news, or intl news. they have learned to fend for themselves and expect nothing.

    You spoke of Zapas. I have worked with them for many years. My grandmother was maya. I build schools for the zapatists, and the auditorium seen around the world during escueltia week, I built that as well.

    One rule I have in assisting people, is I go to the greatest need, I am not concerned with the politics of groups of people, in a free democracy they should be given the right of choice. I only based my decision of who to help on most need. Zapas are good people. with sound family values. I can support good people and ignore the political side, or religious right of choice.

    I leave Mexico with certain lessons learned. and you are correct, Mexico is resistant to change. why? I feel because of this wall built to shield "mi casa" to prevent getting harmed, and feeling working for change is dangerous and hopeless.

    I could write a couple of books on my experiences in Mexico, experiences that are a study of a society that is much different than the Mexico of my grandparents. I am proud of my work, and leave many sweet memories, but I also leave Mexico with a broken heart.....Paz, Chivis

    ReplyDelete
  18. It fills me with joy to learn off instances when people put “boots on the ground” to help in any way, especially when it comes to permanent/semi-permanent infrastructure. While I don’t agree with their religious beliefs, I do my best to at least smile and be friendly to the scores of 15 passenger White Vans full of well-intentioned folk on their way to some marginalized spot to build something useful for the community.
    I tip my hat off to those who put it all on the line—including the lives of their loved ones—, to effect change in a society.
    You hit the nail on the head by stating many feel “working for change is dangerous and hopeless.” It’s really hard to see the ray of hope, especially when one knows what your brethren are capable of, "cuando uno conoce a su gente y sabe de lo que es capaz." When materialism is king, and the overiding sentiments are “primero yo y que chinguen a su madre los demás” or the more common “de que lloren en la mía, a que lloren en la de él…” I keep noticing more and more that those solid family values you speak of, unfortunately, are just “de dientes pa’ fuera” in a lot of cases down here.
    My boy is turning 3 soon, and it’s getting to the point where I have to decide if he’s going to be Mexican or something else. I don’t want to lose him to this shitty society, and I don’t really see things turning around anytime soon, and there’s no Mexican equivalent to Stokely Carmichael that I discern anywhere on the horizon. The core values we instill down here are reprehensible, with materialism, selfishness and greed topping the list. Then again, those 3 values top the list on the US side too, so I guess NAFTA worked. Perhaps Singapore or Denmark might be the best bets. We’ll see.
    Excellent Sunday to you all. Keep up the good fight.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com