Friday, October 5, 2012

Death and mourning in the political class

El Universal. 

By Samuel Gonzalez

Translated by un vato for Borderland Beat

(politica@eluniversal.com.mx )

Friday, October 5, 2012. For years we have held that the spiral of violence in this country would reach the highest levels of the political, business and social classes. Today, unfortunately, it touched a 25 year old young man, son of one of the most important politicians in Mexico today. He enjoys privileged status because of his proximity with the next president's team and with Ruben Moreira.

In the case of the homicide of the young Moreira, we should also remember that the challenge is even greater because they murdered him knowing that his uncle Ruben is the current governor of that state and that his aunt works very closely with the current President-elect, Enrique Pena Nieto. This homicide is a reminder that the violence unleashed these last eight years doesn't distinguish by social class, nor by business, political or cultural status.

It's about a transverse violence that we are all subject to. It's a product of our inability as a society to strengthen the Mexican State, and to reach agreement on a transition that will allow the country's  burdens and benefits to be distributed correctly. This crisis of  weakness in the Mexican State is patent and manifest, it can be seen throughout the length and breadth of the country because we have created preserves of power where there exists a true Mexican feudalism.

We have studied diverse realities from Colombia to Ireland, from Afghanistan to Italy, and in all of them, we find that there is a certain turning point after which the governing elites in a country begin to understand what they have to do to reverse the violence process. Like a great paradox, each famous death, and the pain  it causes, represents a hope that the governing elites will understand what they have to do to have a State capable of providing security and justice for everybody, an environment in which all of us can exercise our rights without a fear of being executed in an absurd war in which criminals impose their law because they know that, one way or another, impunity will prevail and they will not be brought to justice.

This, the impunity, is the product of the weakness of the Mexican State that allows anyone to challenge authority without there being any consequences. The challenge for the next administration is to strengthen the State, to make political actors understand that the State's strength derives from a respect for the law and from the establishment of a system that sanctions everybody equally, that will distribute income to prevent hundreds of thousands from joining organized crime because they don't have any other alternative. It will happen by applying an integrated strategy, something the current administration understood too late. The challenge is not to spend more on federal forces, but to achieve security through fighting corruption, creating transparency, reducing violence and ending a feudalism in political and economic sectors that threatens everybody's future equally.


17 comments:

  1. You do understand your talking about the PRI right?
    Don't hold your breath.

    ReplyDelete
  2. good article, but the problem is that the super rich and elites wont pay a living wage nor taxes to support good pay workers and for the justice system, therefore the cartels have endless supply of poor mainly uneducated desperate people to fill their ranks. the cartels have grown so strong that even parts of the military are completely corrupted. its as simple as that. hope someday it ends, but not holding my breath.

    and yes i know because i own a ranch there and pay 100 bucks per year in property taxes!!!

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  3. PRi dirty as they come .Chapos party.know it sounds messed up but they targeted this kid cuz he was a bastard instead of the acknowledged child as a warning.

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  4. Maybe the PRI should stop taking zeta bribes and start wiping them out. Everyone knows this happened because a nephew of z40's was killed earlier this week. Eye for an eye, nephew for a nephew. Hopefully this will end their business together and the Z's can be wiped out. It is ashamed it had to come at the expense of an honest young man, but hopefully his death will not have been for nothing.

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  5. Los Moreira have robbed and robbed the people of Coahuila! It is always sad when a young one dies however...

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  6. October 5, 2012 6:59 PM The Zetas will never be wiped out as long as they can buy protection at the highest levels of government. This episode shows who are the real bosses in Mexico today. The Zetas and CDS may as well divide the country between them and run them as their private kingdoms. All the "ruling" classes care about is getting their cut of the blood money.

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  7. very sad for any parents to lose a child, but this is great news for mexico. this killing signals the separation of PRI and zetas. no place is this union more evident that in coahuila. chapo must be throwing a party right now celebrating the divorce of zetas and pri

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  8. YOU GUYZ THINK GEORGE H. BUSH WASNT SERIOUS WHEN HE FIRST TALK ABOUT THE NEW WORLD ORDER?

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  9. It used to be that the state had a near monopoly on violence in Mexico (like in all stable states including the USA). This benefitted those close to the state (like in all stable states including the USA). Due to a weak governance system (due to corruption) the Mexican state has increasingly lost the monopoly on violence to criminal organizations. Those organizations have become very powerful (economically and socially in all but top of society) due to the drugs trade.

    This murder is another message to the top of the mexican society that there are challengers out there also for their privlleges.

    In increasingly isolated mexican ruling class is being squeezed from below by organizations utilizing the very system of corruption put in place and cared for by the mexican ruling class.

    Today there is no part in mexican society to credibly represent ethics, development and social justice (all the soft bullshit that liberals claim to stand for and the neo-cons love to spit on).

    ... and the US is heading in exactly the same direction with an increasingly corrupt establishment increasingly losing touch with wider realms of their own society and the rest of the world.

    What is next (if it is not already here)? SIEG HEIL!

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  10. Pena Nieto took millions in this presidential race from both Z's and Chapo; No Way this killing will alienate the PRI. Remember when you lay down with dogs you end up with flea's! They will take out the whole govt. before they will let go of the millions they paid both parties. As far as a nephew for a nephew I think there is alot more to this murder than blood relatives. This was a statement to the PRI that we can get to anyone and will!

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  11. "This homicide is a reminder that the violence unleashed these last eight years doesn't distinguish by social class, nor by business, political or cultural status."

    1 / 100,000 just the same proportion that has the cash in mexico.

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  12. " the problem is that the super rich and elites wont pay a living wage nor taxes to support good pay workers and for the justice system"

    Exactly. While Carlos Slim sits with his billions, cops aren't paid enough to say "no" to a bribe, not enough to hope that others aren't paid off to imagine they can stick together as a gang as cohesive as the cartels. You want to beat a gang you make a gang of cops twice the size with twice the pay with twice the loyalty. You don't let some fat rich fuck sail around on a yacht hoarding a percentage of your country's GNP while the rest of the country burns - if you care at all, which obviously they don't. Fuck, I'm not even against the drug trade, just the violence, but the government of Mexico can't even get establish itself enough to enforce a truce, much less take down any but the smallest cartel. Meanwhile it is what, the 13th biggest economy (with half its people living in squalor). But this is the right-wing, US-dominated ideal for Central America.

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  13. "this killing signals the separation of PRI and zetas."

    One killing in a far off border town going to undo a billion$ business deal? LOL. Hell, this just seals the deal - makes them take each other more seriously and sets the ground rules for the relationship.

    The illicit drug trade - capitalism by any other name

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  14. Mexico is a failed state. There is nothing that can bring it back. It is nothing like Ireland, Colombia or the Middle East. Much worse, rotten to the core and wild, uncontrolable geography and the US to supply all the arms one needs. No other place like it. It will never end. Most of the oligarquia is living in the Woodlands anyway.

    Just remember all that coke the fancy lawyers and traders in NY take is the result of death.

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  15. Hey you, I took time to prepare MY commentary and you didn't post it. I was responding to -->>

    "YOU GUYZ THINK GEORGE H. BUSH WASNT SERIOUS WHEN HE FIRST TALK ABOUT THE NEW WORLD ORDER?"

    I finish with this message to YOU! YOU DON'T THINK ALAN WATT HAS MORE TO SAY IN THE MATTER? What do YOU know?

    Good Luck!

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  16. I feel for the Mexican people, especially the indigenous and the working class.......My hope is that drug decriminilization here in the US will reduce the profits in all this, and lead to a safer and better Mexico....I wonder how much money the cartels are funneling into the US elections trying to keep the war on drugs going.....?

    ReplyDelete

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