Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War

Reports of torture increase

Monday, September 10, 2012 |

El Universal

Silvia Otero

Translated for Borderland Beat by un vato.

According to the report, the problem grew between 2007 and 2011.

El Universal.  9-07-2012. Torture increased in Mexico during this six-year term within the context of the war against organized crime and drug trafficking.  It became a method of "investigation" that all the authorities have resorted to;  just in the period from January 2007 to February 2012, the National Commission on Human Rights (Comision Nacional de los Derechos Humanos; CNDH) reported 251 cases throughout the country that resulted in 56 recommendations, which shows that this practice is far from being eradicated.

This warning is from the document titled, "In the Name of the War Against Crime: A Study of the Phenomenon of torture in Mexico,(En nombre de la guerra contra la delincuencia : Un estudio del fenomeno de la tortura en Mexico) drafted by the organizations ACAT-Francia, the Fray Bartolome de Las Casas Human Rights Center,  the Miguel Agustin Pro Juarez, A.C., Human Rights Center (Centro Prodh) and the Collective Against Torture and Impunity (CCTI).

The report was released yesterday, two months before the U.N. Committee against Torture is set to evaluate Mexico, and it states that this practice "continues to be a modus operandi  in the system of justice."

It points out that, "despite how difficult it is to evaluate and compare existing data, the number of complaints or allegations that the CNDH has registered during these past years seems to show an increase in the phenomenon of torture." 

The evolution in the number of complaints alleging inhumane, cruel and degrading actions, the report indicates, leaves no doubt about the phenomenon: 330 (cases) in 2006;  395 in 2007; 987 in 2008; 1,105 in 2009, and 1,161 in 2010.

The report shows that "in the allegations of torture, the actions of the military and of the federal police are especially questioned." The complaints that the CNDH registered against the National Defense Secretariat (Sedena) increased 1000% (one thousand per cent) between 2006 and 2009.

A work mission that carried out field investigations in several states led to the conclusion that "the majority of the accounts of torture, especially those related to cases involving organized crime, describe a recurring modus operandi."  

In all the cases,  "commandos of armed men wearing hoods quickly descend from trucks with no plates or markings. On the street, in their homes, in vehicles, they mistreat the people there and never identify themselves. People are arrested without being told why they are being detained."

When relatives look for the detainee with the federal or local authorities, the statements point out that police agents and officials "deny almost systematically that they are holding the person."

In this scenario, "the arrest and the first hours or days of the detention constitutes the most severe phase of the torture (accounts).  The person arrested is 'disappeared' and at the mercy of those interrogating him.  Often, the authorities admit they are holding the person and allow relatives to visit him only after the confession phase."

Part of the conclusions of the investigation reveals that, "during the Felipe Calderon administration (the practice) has evolved unfavorably and torture has increased."

Law enforcement agencies and judicial authorities "tend to resort to torture to carry out criminal investigations. According to a model observed frequently at the federal and state level, arbitrary detentions are multiplying, particularly through the abuse of the "caught in the act" (in flagrante delicto) basis (for detention). "

Instead of presenting the detainee immediately before a public ministry or before a judge as required by law, "the forces of law and order detain them in secret and torture them to obtain or condition their subsequent inculpatory confessions."

(The report) concludes that "the methods for reporting violations and carrying out the preliminary inquiry, investigation and punishment are often inefficient and do not allow prevention of new (cases of) torture and mistreatment."

Source: http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/nacion/199818.html

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18 Borderland Beat Comments:

Anonymous said...

Any word on how effective this is in obtaining credible information on criminal associates? Are the torture victims claiming to be innocent? Play with fire and you get burned.

Anonymous said...

I thought it was about the Cartels torturing one another before the executions,lol....but no its about the corrupt police again.

Anonymous said...

Good! The people they are trying to apprehend, deserve no mercy, from the lowly halcon, to the kingpin. Its too bad that innocents may get caught up in this torture by authorities. But more innocents would be getting hurt and killed by animals in the drug business, if this weren't going on. Instead of bothering the government, the National Commission on Human Rights should take up arms against organized crime if they really care about innocents.

Anonymous said...

ty vato for removing the filth

Anonymous said...

This is totally unrelated but according to some news outlets, Ruben Acosta Ibarra, a founding member of Los Zetas was captured in Piedras Negras, Coahuila on Sept. 7 2012.

Presunto jefe de Los Zetas en Piedras Negras cae en Coahuila
http://noticias.terra.com.mx/mexico/seguridad/presunto-jefe-de-los-zetas-en-piedras-negras-cae-en-coahuila,b7ceeae385ca9310VgnVCM20000099cceb0aRCRD.html

Anonymous said...

Drug abuse is evil. The drug war is far more evil and has completely destroyed Mexico.

Anonymous said...

Photos of 16 people killed by la Familia Michoacana in Guerrero http://narcomexicodrugsgangs.blogspot.com/2012/09/abandonan-16-cadaveres-dentro-de-una.html

Anonymous said...

They probably torturing low life narcos. If that's the case then I say keep it up!

Anonymous said...

They should exterminate these animals after some proof of their vicious actions to the inocent or the goverment

Anonymous said...

"Drug abuse is evil. The drug war is far more evil and has completely destroyed Mexico"
Cumbya my lord,cumbya.Those nasty drugs,destroying all these lives of these free thinking adults with a mind of self determination.
Those nasty drug dealers,selling it to school children,and giving it away for free to entrap them.They do,i seen it on the news,i know all about what they do.

Anonymous said...

The life of criminals and Cops is a tough one. Liberal,scensitive people are not part of either Law Enforcement or Criminal gangs,and belong in art colonies. Torture,ass kickings etc are part of the game, always will be,so whats the big deal?

Anonymous said...

Its funny how Celso was captured two weeks ago and they now capture el 20 aka pelos,I guess somebody snithched the olny one left in piedras is el metro...n for y'all who don't know el z20 was one if not the last original zetas...don't believe me do some research

Anonymous said...

I do know that El Celso was tight with El Z-40 and he has been accused of betraying his own for the sake of gaining strength with the Zetas. But i also heard that Oliver Bres was held by the Army and that he snitched on both El Celso and El Pelos. I honestly don't see a connection between Oliver and El Celso as they are as far apart as could possibly be soccialy but they do share the one common denominator that ties them together.

Anonymous said...

The CNDH are appointed government lackeys whose job it is to cover up the majority of torture and abuse allegations against cops and military personnel. Non-government human right's organizations list cases of torture at being about 1000-times higher than the government will own up to. Mexico is a festering cesspool where human rights is a joke.

Anonymous said...

September 11, 2012 7:24 PM
"el z20 was one if not the last original zetas"

I thought Braulio Arellano Dominguez, El Gonzo, was Z-20 ?And he dead?I thought it was Prisciliano Ybarra Yepis who just got caught?
Anyone sort some of this out for us on here?

Anonymous said...

When one gets into "law enforcement" isn't it to up hold the law?????? Atleast that's what I thought that's why they're called "LAW ENFORCEMENT"..... To me if one is doing the same as the other, then they're both the same, and in this case this applies. The only difference is who employs them and their motives.....( oh, and that most law enf. Doesn't sell drugs). And for the individuale that tried to justify innocents getting caught up in this, some way of thinking. I bet you probably defend that to the fullest....and I also bet that you wouldn't defend it as vigorously against this so called law enforcement if you just happend to be one of those innocents getting caught up in this. If you think your philosophy is true, why has the murder rates and crime been climbing since around the same time. Every year the murder rates have been going up. Now give me one statistic and/or anything that could be verified to back up what you said. When law enforcement break the law regardless of the reasons, to me it's worse, because they're breaking the very thing they swore to uphold. Criminals never took an oath to be law abbiding citizens or uphold the law so they have no duty in doing so, but the so called law enforcement, what can they say for not following their own rules? Alot of people say they tortured, so let them taste it now. To that I say (the above applies to it also but this is something to think on),how about the kids that are growing up? When they hear about it, in some childrens mind its not going to be wrong when they grow up, they might get the idea if it was done by law enforcement then it must be alright. Oh, and believe me, after all this cartel stuff calms down,it's going to be even tuffer to get rid of these procedures....just keep that in mind jay walkers.

Anonymous said...

Us mexicans are real unlike u fake ass blood and crips

Anonymous said...

Smoke weed

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