Saturday, August 4, 2012

A family torn apart in three days

Borderland Beat

Patricia Davila (Translated by un vato of Borderland Beat)

From Sunday, June 17, to Tuesday, June 19, the Porras Gonzalez family saw how two of it members were murdered and how the mafia took all their businesses and homes in Villa Ahumada, one of the last redoubts of La Linea, the group of Juarez Cartel killers. After the executions, death threats were made against the remaining family members. From Texas, where they are waiting to be granted asylum, the Porras family tells Proceso about their tragedy, for which they blame the federal and Chihuahua governments. The worst part is that, to this day, they have no clear idea what triggered this rage against them.  

San Antonio, Texas. Proceso. 8-3-2012.   "We aren't prepared for this. There's no way to help you. You're leaving in 10 minutes. Get ready!" so said Cesar Augusto Peniche Espejel, delegate of the Procuraduria General de la Republica (PGR) in Ciudad Juarez, once Attorney General Marisela Morales gave her approval for an operation in which federal, state and municipal police cordoned off streets and avenues through which a convoy escorted the four vehicles carrying the 20 members of the Porras Gonzalez family, threatened with death by La Linea.

The caravan got to the Mexican side of the Santa Fe International Bridge. From there, the Porras family continued by themselves to the U.S. side, to El Paso... and went directly to immigration officers to ask for political asylum.

Today, the Porras live in San Antonio, receiving help from by some neighbors in this city, waiting for their request for asylum to be resolved.

The Porras family is originally from Villa Ahumada, a municipality considered by the United States government to be one of the few redoubts in Chihuahua still under control of La Linea, the group of hired killers (sicarios) for the Juarez Cartel. Villa Ahumada is under the control of Jesus Salas Aguayo, El Chuyin, 35 years old. The United States government accuses him of ordering the murder  --on May 15, 2009-- of Jose Daniel Gonzalez Galeana, former member of the armed group,  who lived in El Paso and was a protected witness for  Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

According to ICE, El Chuyin mistrusted Gonzalez Galeana and blamed him for the arrest on May 13, 2008, of his fellow countryman Pedro Sanchez Arras, aka El Tigre, who was third in command of the (Juarez) cartel under Vicente Carrillo Fuentes .

Villa Ahumada is famous for being the land that gave shelter to Juarez Cartel leaders such as Rafael Munoz Talavera, head of the organization with Rafael Aguilar Guajardo and Amado Carrillo Fuentes. Then El Tigre came out and, after his arrest, Salas Aguayo assumed command, even after after people stopped mentioning the name of Juan Pablo Ledezma, El JL, and after the arrest of the Juarez organization's chiefs, like Gonzalo Garcia Garcia, El Chalo; Jose Rodolfo Escajeda, El Rikin, and Antonio Acosta Hernandez, El Diego.

According to ICE, El Chayin became the La Linea strongman for the Villa Ahumada, Buenaventura, Galeana, Constitucion, Flores Magon, Juarez and Chihuahua region, where he controls between 300 and 400 criminals who sell marijuana and cocaine and carry out kidnappings, murders and extortion, and who have finished off entire families.

This is the place where the Porras Gonzalez's tragic story began.

The first execution

"Last Sunday, June 17, my nephew Carlos called me on the phone; he told me that apparently his father, Rodolfo, had had an accident or had been killed by somebody. I immediately went to pick him up to go to the Municipal Police. There, an officer told us that he (Rodolfo) was dead, to go to the police at El Valle, where a female official told us he was murdered and (for us) to go to Le Baron to see the State Police. At that place they told me somebody had reported a rollover and that they would deliver his body the next day after the autopsy. An hour later, that same officer told me to go for my brother's (body); they filled out the autopsy certificate in my presence," narrates Jorge Porras, the brother of Rodolfo, the man who was murdered.

He goes on: "While we were transporting my brother, on the 160 km drive from El Valle to Villa Ahumada, several pickup trucks cut in ahead of us, with men who threatened us with their weapons. At last, we got to town and buried Rodolfo on Monday, June 18. I told my brothers and nephews that we should go to work like normal on Tuesday. My nephews got up to open the businesses, I fell asleep. Suddenly the phone rings: it was my nephew Cesar, another son of Rodolfo.

"'Listen,' he told me, 'It looks like they killed my brother Jaime at the cemetery.' I couldn't believe it. If it was already a nightmare, we were now living in horror."

When he left his house, Jorge found his mother, Ana, and his sister; he told them what had happened to Jaime. They went to the cemetery to look for his body. They found him lying on the little mound of dirt that covered Rodolfo's grave, which he had gone to water early that morning.

"He was an innocent 18 year old. He wouldn't hurt anybody. I got angry. I took off my shirt and covered him. I didn't let my mother and my sister get close, I took them back to the pickup, I told them we should go to the ministerial police so they could pick up the body. At the entrance to the cemetery, my sister in law, Jaime's mother was coming in. We found out later that she met up with two sicarios. She confronted them, she asked them to return her son to her. 'It wasn't us. Get the hell out of here, you old bitch,' they answered," Jorge recalls.

The ministerial police refused to pick up Jaime's body.

Here, Hector Porras, older brother of the murdered Rodolfo, interjects: "Jorge argued with the police, although their attitude was not unexpected because we know that in Villa Ahumada they're involved with La Linea. One of my sisters in law went to the federal police quartered in the town, but they didn't pay attention to her, either. Then, in an Oxxo gas station, Jorge ran into some federal patrols assigned to Colonia Le Baron, in Galeana, who by coincidence were driving through the town. He told them what was happening.

In Villa Ahumada, the Porras own some businesses: three creameries, a shoe and clothing store, a beer store, a car wash and an insurance company. While Jorge was trying to convince the federal police, the sicarios began to loot all those businesses. Finally, the federal police agreed to assist, they asked the family to get together at Rodolfo's, the murdered brother's, ranch, while they waited for other patrols to relieve them.

At the ranch,  Rodolfo's son, Cesar, received threats on his cell phone from the criminals: "The first call came on June 19, at 1:30 p.m., after they killed my brother. They said I was next, to get out of town; in another call, that I and all my family would be next;  in one more call, to get out or leave town. Five minutes later, my uncle Jorge gets another call, telling him that the next one would be his mother, that is, my grandmother Ana Maria. She's 67 years old. My dad, Rodolfo, would have been 50 on July 22," he says.

When the sicarios found out that three federal police vehicles were at the ranch, they said: "Tell those pussies to get out of there because if they don't, it will get worse. The police couldn't protect us for long so they asked us to leave the town quickly. They were afraid that the gang would regroup and kill all of us at the same time. Just before that, they asked for back-up from Ciudad Juarez. Forty minutes later, two units showed up. An hour after we met up with them at the Oxxo gas station, we were on our way to Juarez with whatever we were wearing. It was 3:00 in the afternoon," says Hector.

They tried to get the military to help them, because the federal police were scared, too. They called the emergency number for the Department of Defense in Mexico City; there, they gave them the numbers for the 5th Military Zone, but nobody answered. By them, in addition to the businesses, the sicarios had also taken possession of the Porras family's seven homes.

"When the federal police back-up from Juarez got there, a commander told me:  'I'll get your family to Juarez. I swear. Tell me where to leave you.' I asked them to take us to the international border crossing or to the 5th Military Zone, wherever we would be safer. Twelve adults and eight children traveled in four of our vehicles. We left the town. We left Jaime lying there in the cemetery. We left our possessions. We didn't have any money, no documents, no nothing. Finally, they left us at the PGR (offices)," says Jorge.

At the PGR office, only Jorge was allowed to enter. A female official of the Ministerio Publico (prosecutor's office) met me and filed the complaint.  Outside, afraid, the family asked for protection and to be allowed to enter.

"They agreed to protect us. They put us up right there. We slept in an office that was being repaired. We had one blanket per person. During the day, they let us out into a garden, we would sit down on the grass, we would eat there. The PGR provided the food, other times it was the state government," recounts Jorge.

--Did you at any time meet with the PGR delegate, Peniche Espejel?

--The day after we got there he talked with us. He told us that the PGR was not prepared for situations like ours. That they had never had a case like this and that there was no way to help us.-- responds Alejandro, another of Rodolfo's brothers.

He continues: "With him, we would talk about how they were going to protect us and about what the federal government could offer us. He said that the only option was a shelter in Mexico City, but that it was a genuine prison, that we could not go out for any reason. That the federal government lacked the capability to take over this type of case. In view of that, we asked him to transport us to the international border crossing so we could ask for asylum. He refused. However, a social worker and the public ministry officer who attended us when we got there gave us a business card with the phone number for Attorney Carlos Spector, of El Paso. They said he would help us."

--We would see Licenciado Peniche every day and every day he would tell us the same thing: that nothing could be done, that he was not the one to make the decision... There came a time in which he told us to do whatever we wanted to, that it was impossible for them to transfer us elsewhere. On Saturday, June 23, he told us that Attorney General Marisela Morales Ibanez was aware of our case and that, furthermore, on Monday, June 25, she would go talk to us. It made no sense to wait for her. We couldn't wait. We demanded that he transport us to the (international) bridge-- added Cesar.

The family called the media to tell them about their case. They also spoke with a priest, a human rights activist with a non-government organization (NGO), Paso del Norte, that, along with a letter to the (PGR) delegate, also sent patrol vehicles to protect them:

"Under pressure, the delegate decided to help us. On Saturday the 23rd, he said they would close Lincoln Avenue and all its side streets so we could get to the bridge. We left at noon. He told us to hurry. He said he was afraid and that he didn't want more people to know they were going to take us away," he remembers.

Alejandro adds: "He told us: 'We can't escort you all the way to the bridge because it would look very bad for us to deliver you to the United States, but we will organize a security operation and nobody can infiltrate on the route you take."


No clear motives

Before they left, Jorge complained to the delegate: "We lost everything from one day to another and the sicarios are not even worried, they drive around the town in my brother Rodolfo's car. I keep asking myself , why are they still free?  I think about the way they threw us out, how they are brazenly selling off our possessions. What's going on? Why don't you do anything to them? He answered: 'Leave all of  that behind. Be satisfied that you're all together and safe.' That's the last time we saw him."

--Why did they kill Rodolfo and his son Jaime? Why are they after you?

Attorney Spector, who is helping them with the asylum request, intervenes: "This is a PAN (Partido Accion Nacional) family. Hector has served as councilman, in Villa Ahumada, he was the secretary of the Accion Electoral (elections committee) of the PAN, secretary general, president of the Municipal Committee, the same with his brother Rodolfo. The case of the Porras family is unheard of because this case merges political persecution with drug trafficking.

--Was belonging to the PAN a factor in their persecution?

--We cannot confirm it but neither can we dismiss it. The PRI governs in Villa Ahumada, in the previous administration, the PAN was in (power), but they have always been under the control of La Linea. But now El Chuyin is related to the wife of the current mayor, Fernando Vasquez-- responds Hector Porras.

He adds: "We know who killed them, but we don't know why. Some say that it was because he exclaimed "Good!"when he learned that a brother of Chuyin committed suicide; others think the it was because he refused to pay some extortion."

The case file that's in the PGR office in Ciudad Juarez notes that Jaime was killed by two men, known by their aliases La Roberta and El Pacman, because someone in the Porras family attributed Rodolfo's death to a person by the name of Adrian Barron. Apparently, Adrian Barron is a member of La Linea. In addition, the night before his death, Barron invited Rodolfo to a celebration at Ejido Constitucion, where he was murdered.

"I'm asking the President of the Republic, Felipe Calderon and the governor of Chihuahua, Cesar Duarte, to accept their responsibility in this case. They are responsible, directly or indirectly, for what is happening in Villa Ahumada, because impunity is part of the inefficiency of the government. Ours is not the only family that has fled after their loved ones were murdered: there were also the Munozes and the Marrufos," declres Hector.

Dona Ana, the family matriarch, tells Proceso that she left everything: the house her husband left her seven years ago and, above all, her dead. "It has been tremendous. I'll never feel at peace. When we received those calls with their death threats, I told everybody: Let's go! Let's go! They've already killed two of mine, I don't want them to kill anybody else. I was terrified.

"My grandson Jaime was left lying there in the cemetery. Because of the fear we had, we left him there, as if he had no one. I know the town priest buried him, and I'm grateful with all of my heart, with my soul. Yesterday they burned down my son Rodolfo's ranch. Everything is dismantled. In town, everybody is terrified. I was not afraid because my husband taught my sons to work, to start from the bottom so they would never get involved in bad things. That's what they did. And, look, what good was it? Material things are the least (important), but my dead sons..."

Dona Ana tells about the torment that the trip from Villa Ahumada to Juarez turned into when they were escorted by the federal police. "It was tremendous. My son Rodolfo's wife, the mother of Jaime, kept fainting again and again. Losing her son was terrible, but leaving him lying there in the cemetery, in those conditions, without burying him, that's something that you cannot live with. A mother cannot stand it. The pain is too much."

55 comments:

  1. you lineros are some sick sons of a bit**s soon or later you must all pay a debt. what you plant is what you harvest
    -7guero

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  2. This is the real reality of Mexico and this is just one story imagine the other thousands that did not make it here !!

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  3. I'd like to know what the readers of this tragic story were thinking and feeling as they red this frustrating tragic account of the Hell On Earth that the Porras Gonzalez family has had to endure, I'm hoping that some of you will talk about your personal experience.

    If only there were a way to reverse the damage done and permanently remove the parasites who work for the devil and destroy LIVES & People's Livelyhoods.

    SenB.

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  4. Si Los bloggers de aqui kieren ver algo,interesante agan google a acciones anti narcos,nuevo Laredo y lean Los commentarios son de 2007 y todo lo ke se predicto ya paso en vida real curensela att: larete

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    1. Freak out how on this link all the names and people fighting on the sitetheir names were not yet well known but the players involved knew exactly who everyone is I think this is rigjt before la Barbe went to n.laredo to start this war he said he was wat a trip good article!!!!

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  5. Crazy stuff hope for the best.

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  6. fellow concerned BBers.
    first if you are a USA BBer please keep up any pressure possible. write letters to your congressman. contact local news media.
    be the eyes and ears of local law enforcement.
    report suspicious activities on your block or anywhere you see criminal activity. some of the biggest code name operations in US history started with a just a phone tip.
    Mexico has it worse but to have your head in the sand and say it's not happening here is just foolish. my realtor friends tell me about the huge expensive houses being bought up without even haggling over the price.
    the nightly news is reporting kidnappings, cartel executions, plane seizures with loads of drugs, suv and four door truck thefts always on the rise, etc, etc, etc,...
    the news reported the theft of 12 weapons from a gun store when in fact it was over 50.
    so even the very news we rely on is very apt to not give us accurate information.
    if it suits your needs get a CCL and practice, practice, practice, a man just got killed with his own weapon because in the heat of the moment he was unable to get it from safe to fire.
    groups of men? if you have trusted family in the same town you live in then work something out with them. no immediate family then your fishing bowling or hunting buddy. no friends get dogs, the dogs will most likely be killed but it will give you and your family a few more seconds to react. afterword give the dog a heroes burial as he saved your life.
    keep a high capacity semi automatic rifle and again i need to mention the need for training.
    try your local gun clubs, and rifle range.
    and pray.

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  7. My heart goes out to this family ! If I could ,I would tell them, they shouldn't feel bad about leaving Jaime's body at the cemetary. He would only want them to be safe. His spiirt was, and is with them. Really hope for the best for this family.
    I don't know how this SOB, president of Mexico, can sleep at night ! We could blame cartels and others, but he has allowed chaos to rule. The blood is on his hands, because he chose to look the other way.
    As for the cartels, will they ever go back to "The old school" ways ? How sad !

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  8. What a corrupt and useless country....no law....it's time Mexico....revolution....kill alll these losers..

    Mexican Men Wanted to Kill Drug Cartel Members..no experience required.

    Are there any heroes in Mexico or just venders?

    Stand up for your country and take it back and kill all who oppose. Crooked cops, poiticians, murderers, drug dealers, assassians, rapist, kidnappers, extorinists, collaborators, crooked military, etc.

    Man your country is in trouble. I pray for you and your honest people.

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  9. as a former member of the military i know many fine men and women that would never consider betraying the Oath to The Constitution of the United States of America. having said that, i regret to say that some have and some will betray the Oath. here is a navy seal that did.
    this story has direct ties into the mexican drug cartels as the agents told the conspirators that the shipments were headed to mexico.

    C-4 seized in Colorado in Navy SEAL smuggling case

    Navy SEAL, Others Accused of Weapon Smuggling

    Ken Ritter – LAS VEGAS (AP) — November 4, 2010 – Federal agents seized five pounds of C-4 military explosives from the Colorado home of a man accused with a Navy SEAL and a Las Vegas associate of smuggling machine guns from Iraq into the U.S. for sale and shipment to Mexico, authorities said Thursday.

    Grenades and night-vision goggles also were found in the Durango, Colo., home of 34-year-old Richard Paul, according to federal prosecutors and federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agents in Las Vegas and Colorado.

    Paul and Andrew Kaufman, 36, of Las Vegas, were arrested Wednesday and appeared Thursday before federal magistrate judges in Durango and Las Vegas on conspiracy charges. Each was ordered held in federal custody pending an evidentiary hearing.

    They are accused of conspiring with Navy SEAL Nicholas Bickle of San Diego to smuggle and sell weapons to an undercover federal agent in Nevada and Colorado.

    “As long as they got paid … they didn’t care if the weapons wound up in Mexico or on the streets of Las Vegas,” federal prosecutor Drew Smith told U.S. Magistrate Judge George Foley Jr. in Las Vegas.

    Smith characterized Bickle, 33, as a “rogue Navy SEAL” — an active-duty special warfare operator 1st class who Smith said also worked as a consultant on the Hollywood movie “Transformers 3.”

    Bickle was arrested Wednesday and was due to appear Friday before a federal magistrate judge in San Diego.

    Smith said outside court that federal agents expected to find weapons, but were surprised to find five pounds of C-4 plastic explosive, blasting cap detonators and other military items at Paul’s home in Colorado.

    Brad Briersdorf, a Colorado-based ATF spokesman, said there were no evacuations of the neighborhood while agents removed the military-grade explosive. C-4 is a stable compound that requires an initiator or a blasting cap to cause a blast.

    Briersdorf declined to elaborate about the destructive power of the explosives found in Paul’s home.

    Smith said federal agents were still serving search warrants Thursday at Bickle’s home, vehicle and a storage unit in the San Diego area.

    “What we have here is simply greed at any cost,” Smith told the judge in Las Vegas.
    –~~~~~~~~~~~~–

    Bickle is accused in a criminal complaint of smuggling 80 AK-47 weapons from Iraq or Afghanistan, including factory-made 7.62 mm Iraqi machine guns that would be difficult or impossible to trace. Other weapons included Ruger handguns of the type used by U.S. military police officers.

    “According to the other members of the organization, this was possible because Navy SEALs are not searched when returning from deployments,” the criminal complaint said.

    Las Vegas-based ATF Special Agent Eric Fox alleged in a criminal complaint filed Oct. 29 that at least one of the accused coconspirators bragged that the guns were from the military in the Middle East and would be untraceable.

    The investigation began with a tip from a fourth man, an ex-felon turned confidential informant facing felony battery domestic violence and robbery charges in Nevada. He is cooperating with authorities and was not charged in the federal case.

    Neither the informant nor the undercover agent was identified.

    Bickle is quoted in the complaint as warning the informant of the consequences of turning against him.

    “If you ever (expletive) me, you know who we are,” he is quoted as saying. “We’re the government, we’ll catch you.”

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  10. Mexico has become a "Filthy Cesspool" of supposed humanity... it is time.. for the
    Revolution of Revolutions for Our Myan and
    Aztec Cousins in the South...! Long Live Liberty!

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  11. You revolution is already happening. It is just the wrong people.

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  12. .

    I've red everything that you guys have posted as commentaries here today (including the suggested link to check out -> "acciones anti narcos,nuevo Laredo" <- and I just want to say that I can really feel the intense / involved energy flowing on this page here today on this August 4.

    María

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  13. http://www.npr.org/2012/01/28/145996427/mexican-community-takes-taboo-stance-on-guns#commentBlock
    of course the npr are biased left of center with this false statement "But do Mexicans want gun laws similar to those in the U.S., where buying an assault rifle can be as easy as buying a beer?".
    although most anything can be legally purchased it is far from being as easy as buying a beer.

    Title II weapons

    The National Firearms Act of 1968 (NFA) defines a number of categories of regulated firearms. These weapons are collectively known as NFA firearms and include the following:

    Machine guns—this includes any firearm which can fire more than 1 cartridge per trigger pull. Both continuous fully automatic fire and "burst fire" (i.e., firearms with a 3-round burst feature) are considered machine gun features. The weapon's receiver is by itself considered to be a regulated firearm."

    other than npr not knowing one type of weapon from another i thought it was a decent read.

    Law-Abiding Mexicans Taking Up Illegal Guns

    by John Burnett
    January 28, 2012

    In Mexico, where criminals are armed to the teeth with high-powered weapons smuggled from the United States, it may come as a surprise that the country has some of the most restrictive gun laws in the world.

    Law-abiding Mexicans who want a gun to defend themselves have no good options. Either they fight government red tape to get a legal permit, or they buy one on the black market.

    After an outbreak of violence, one embattled community in northern Mexico called Colonia LeBaron has begun to ask if it's time for the country to address its gun laws.

    A farming town about 130 miles southwest of El Paso, Texas, in the border state of Chihuahua, Colonia LeBaron was founded by breakaway Mormons from the U.S. who wanted to practice polygamy. Today, most residents hold dual citizenship, speak English and retain close ties to the U.S. A few still practice plural marriage.

    A Community Arms Itself

    The militancy of Colonia LeBaron began on May 5, 2009, when kidnappers seized a 16-year-old boy and demanded a $1 million ransom.

    Though he was released unharmed, the townsfolk came together and formed an anti-crime group to take a stand against the rampant kidnappings and extortion. Their leader was Benjamin LeBaron.

    But on July 7, 2009, close to 20 men showed up at Benjamin LeBaron's house, according to his older brother, Julian LeBaron.

    "They wanted to terrorize everyone into never opposing them," Julian LeBaron says. "They dragged Benjamin out of his house, and [his brother-in-law Luis Widmar] came to help him."

    Then, he says, the criminals took the two men a couple of miles down the road and shot them.

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  14. where has respect gone? real respect is not based on fear.

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  15. For all you people that feel sorry for this family let me just point out that this was a narco family that got its ass handed to them for thinking that la Gente Nueva was in Chihuahua to stay.

    Just look for the clues right there in the story, but I will point out the most glaring one, the Marrufo family also fled town. Antonio Marrufo was from Villa Ahumada, and he was responsible for perpetrating at least half of the butchery throughout Ciudad Juarez' most horrible years, and if you think that his family was not involved think again, you all have no clue how shit works in Mexico, remember family first, and that is why for the most part a drug lord's family is usually involved, as was the case in this other family's "tragedy" when Rodolfo the top cop was the primary target.

    Why do you all feel sorry for these individuals if they have also reaped what they sowed? And now that the GN have been run out of Villa Ahumada what did they expect would happen, they would go unoticed? Remember that GN "terrorized" numerous families involved with La linea in Villa Ahumada in 2008-2010? You know what they say about payback, right?

    Now I myself didn't feel bad any of those failies now or then, because they were part of a network that, when in war, runs the risk of getting targeted, its just comes with the territory.

    Carlos Spector sure plays the angles to a tee and with all the families he has helped gain asyslum you can bet he will keep them financially indebted for a better part of their years in the US.

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  16. Vato...
    You quickly became my favorite BB reporter. We are so fortunate to have you. You flawlessly translate form the best articles that I confess I read them of course, Zeta, RioDoce, Proceso, and a few others but shy away from because the time to translate is lenghty.

    Not only do you translate but you carefully select the cream of the crop that conveys to the English reader information and personal stories of the life along the frontera.

    If you remember, please add "TRANSLATED BY VATO OF BORDERLAND BEAT" And while I am requesting things..up in the upper left corner if you would please type Borderland Beat this does not relplace the author or credit, but because MUNDO and BDN have created an english blog called "BlogDrugTrafficker" that is an exact duplicate of BB...possibly clone software or duplicating our RSS this is our little protest so readers know where the work originated, Statfor has used BDT in their "work" and gave them credit yet it was ours, some was original work of ours. I asked Statfor to correct sending the documentation but they have ignored my request.

    and...last but not least, you have another fan..a much more lofty fan than I and one of my favorite writers, who along with Bowden (my fave) wrote El Sicario. She has reposted your work and has given credit and link" see july 19th and 27th....Paz, Chivis

    http://fronteralist.org/

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  17. How very sad, I feel for the family and will keep them in my prayers.

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  18. It's happen to dear friend of mine. Same story.
    Give the good people guns be over in 6 months

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  19. Good article... La linea are a bunch of cowards.. they couldn't hang with Chapo so they kill innocent people.. pinche bola de culones its what they are.. evrybody in Chihuahua hates this fucking cowards.. hope the family is able to stay in the US.. and Fuck u Calderon....

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  20. Don't worry, the gringos will do as you ask and not get involved. We will not enter your country for any reason, as you request. We know you dislike us intensely and we recognize the sovereignty of your country. If you request our intervention we will assume you are doing so under threat from your countrymen and we will expect you to resolve the problem yourselves.

    If you wish to immigrate to to the US, you will have to wait your turn and meet our criteria to be allowed legal entry to the US. Do not expect the policies of one US government to carry over to the next. The flood of immigrants from Mexico, both legal and illegal, continues to be very difficult for us to deal with. Especially when you consider that the Mexican government has little to offer in return except a market that is rather unstable. In the end, you will feel much better if you handle this on your own.

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  21. Chivis: You are too kind. I will make the changes you have asked for. As for my work, I don't want to assume too much, but I think that, like you, I feel an obligation to inform our U.S. readers about what is really happening in Mexico. I'm not too concerned about what happens to the rich and mighty, on either side of the fight; they can take care of themselves and are always surrounded by their "guaruras," as bodyguards are called in Chihuahua. I am more concerned with showing how this insane war affects "a los de a pie."

    I will continue to look for material that informs and educates us, and I will try not to lose too much in translation. Ahi nos vemos.

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  22. And some people try to compare the US to Mexico?
    Imagine the frustration and anger,all the mixed up emotions.A part of me wouldnt care about anything other than going after and killing the ones responsible,as many as i could before i got killed."Riding around in the victims truck"?
    It is even worse than you could imagine.Mexico does need a strong man,a type of tyrant,who wouldnt care about the"human rights"of dogs like this,i said before,if you see them riding in a convoy with automatic weapons,kill them,dont arrest them,kill them with extreme prejudice.These people had business's,a lot of local people would have used them,they would employ people,jobs,money,circulation,do these bitches understand any of this.They dont care about Mexico,just themselves.Something radical needs doing to solve this shit.These dudes aint afraid to die,comes with the territory,so fuckin kill them,all of them.Leave the decent people behind to prosper and enrich Mexico.

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  23. the deal here is that these cartels take the scum that is already in our towns.. you know! the losers nobody wants around becouse they are drug addicts or thieves or can't keep a job. then they are recruited by cartels and become untouchable by local laws. now you have a person who despises everyone that fired or ridiculed him and in turn these cowards tell the other cartel scum that you are involved with the contras to justify your demise. then they go after your loved ones, bottom line in mexico you can't have anything they might like or want becouse they will kill you for it. we as mexicanos will have to go back and fight to liberate mexico!! everyone with courage and hunger is already in the U.S.A. atte. malcolm mex

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  24. a little bit of justice.



    NEW YORK (AP) - A former state governor of Mexico has pleaded guilty in New York to conspiring to launder millions of dollars in cocaine bribe payments.

    Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara (buh-RAH'-ruh) says Mario Ernesto Villanueva Madrid pleaded guilty to a money laundering conspiracy count Thursday in federal court. Authorities say Villanueva Madrid conspired to launder the money from the Juarez Cartel through bank accounts in the U.S. and other countries.

    Bharara said Friday the Juarez Cartel is one of Mexico's most violent cocaine cartels.

    Villanueva Madrid is the ex-governor of Quintana Roo, where Cancun is situated. He was extradited from Mexico in 2010 and initially pleaded not guilty to drug-related charges.

    The 64-year-old faces up to 20 years in prison when sentenced Oct. 26.

    His attorney hasn't returned an email seeking comment. has video
    http://www.krgv.com/news/ex-mexican-governor-guilty-in-ny-money-laundering-case/

    ReplyDelete
  25. This is a disgusting story. What the hell - the country of Mexicans, their machismos and their officials whom should be far far more macho can't even do the right macho thing and protect their own citizens and taxpayers? Bring in the Pepes to help them! Seems God is even fed up with them. Mexico has lost face completely. It is unrecognizable.

    Mexico=PRI=Narco=Shame=K Lastima

    ReplyDelete
  26. Was the family attacked because it was financially successful and they wanted their businesses?

    ReplyDelete
  27. Loved the article, so much goes unnoticed, unsaid, unprinted in these cities, in these times. I get caught up in the whos who, whos winning, whose here, whose there, but like you said peoples lives are torn apart, and life just continues.

    But, isn't the word, that these families, who are being displaced, wouldn't generalize all of them, but some, in the specefic Juarez areas, are being forced out because of their previous loyalty to GN/ Juarez Cartel defectors? Who have lost power and influence?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Can any of BB reporters find out the scoop on the narcobusinessman Armando Cazares Flores gunned down in Guymas, Sonora on friday the 3rd? Was he related to the Cazares that was taken down in the outskirts of Guadalajara a few months ago? It's rummored that Cazares Flores was gunned down by Beltran-Leyva sicarios. Want to know more but everyone in Guaymas is tightlipped because his family is very influential and said to be tied to the Sinaloa Cartel.

    ReplyDelete
  29. One more try.

    1. What kind of guns would any of you propose be handed to the Mexican common folk not involved in organized crime? (Ak-47s for example [repeat fire] or a single shot gun) Name your gun of preference if any.

    2. If the citizens all have guns of some sort ¿how will it be possible to differentiate criminals with guns and citizens with guns?

    3. Would this complicate matters, bring more violence, lead to more loss of innocent citizens?

    4. Would some citizen lose control without warning during an emotional 'fit' and turn on a ¿

    a) family member?
    b) a relative (pariente)
    c) neighbor
    d) employer
    e) policía
    f) a friend
    g) a drinking buddy ?

    SB.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Thats BULLSH**!! When someone in mexico is successful and influential they are protected and left alone. Theres something they arent saying or telling. I think these people defected because everyone knows that usaully high ranking people dont live in the city. They're were left out to dry or tjey pissed off the wrong guy. Once either cartel finds out what they need to know ur useless they dont need you. It dors suck what happened to them though but thats what happens when u believe a complete backstabbing stranger with tall tales. If it eas too good to be true? Guess what? It was.

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  31. Que cosas ya llevo 3 años viendo esto de Borderland beat y los casos de asesinatos de los Z`s han parado al casi 80% desde las elecciones que gano el PRI de Peña Nieto!!!! que raro de Mexico Clasico,todos sabemos quienes son los malos y los amigos de los malos bueno que se puede esperar;del que fue postulado por Moreira "el Z mayor de Coahuila" y eso lo saben muy bien todos los de alla y vaya que hasta el Lazcano y el Treviño lo respetan.

    ReplyDelete
  32. here is a five page story about the tunnels of nogales. hope an admin can put it in forums with the photos.
    The Narco Tunnels of Nogales
    By Adam Higginbotham on August 02, 2012
    http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-08-02/the-narco-tunnels-of-nogales#p1

    ReplyDelete
  33. U fucking cowards, I'm for hire to face off any of this fucking loosers, si tienes problemas como dagos markar estoy para ayudar

    ReplyDelete
  34. Bola de lacras, si tienes problemas con lacras como estos porfavar de comunicarse con migo para ponerle alto a estos animales.

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  35. •May 17 2008- Presumed members of the Sinaloa Cartel attacked Villa Ahumada, Chihuahua, and killed the police chief, two officers, and three civilians, and kidnapped at least 10 additional people.

    Feb 10 2009 - Same scenario, 9 kidnapped but this time the Army pursues and kills the GN kidnappers, but 6 of 9 kidnapped individuals dies as well.

    I am telling you, for all you latecomers, that feel sorry for these so-called victims, that they had it coming to them, their is more to this than the media is putting out, simply because the Juarez Cartel should be dead but Chapo couldnt deliver on his promise. Yeah, La Linea isnt too popular nowadays, but wait a couple years when shit goes back to the way it was and no one in Juarez will give a fuck about all the blood spilled because the money will be coming in again, and in the end that is the real bottom line. Not even you people, American or otherwise, that right now feel so much pity for us Juarenses and our poor Country, State, and City will remember how the violence affected J town, so why all the emotion right now you fucking hypocrites?

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  36. I still don't understand why they must come to the US. There are hundreds of other countries in the world to ask for asylum. If you get whacked waiting, it is natural selection. Just the way the conservatives choose it to be.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Hola '8:05 PM' August 4, buen mensaje tuyo

    He makes a good point and so I ask:

    ¿Por qué las fuerzas armadas no remueven a esos políticos corruptos conectados a las organizaciones criminales? ¿No hay manera de quitar a esos traidores corruptos?
    .
    Why doesn't the military remove those politicians, the ones connected to criminal organizations? Is there not a way to remove those corrupt traitors by some governmental agency or arm?

    ReplyDelete
  38. It amazes me that an entire family can be targeted and wiped off the face of the earth by a bunch of drug addicts. Just think of the corruption that exists to make that possible.

    ReplyDelete
  39. hello '1:17 AM (August 5)'

    I agree and good point. I wonder how many Mexican's fleeing Mexico have tried entering Canada the USA neighbor and how many have been able to enter?

    SB

    ReplyDelete
  40. No pues esta cabron pero yo fuera mandado a mi jente (familia) apedir el asilo i yo me rregreso cadaquien conose supueblo i sabe quien son los mierdas y pues a tumbar cabesas total si vamos a morir k sea con dignidad. I a esa polisia k verguensa yamarse polisia i todos esos pendejos k aplauden los corridos de narcos aiestan sus idolos eso eslo k son enverdad puras mierdas k nunca devieron aber nasido

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  41. Army is not for removing corrupted politicians.
    Unless this is a totalitarian country. Mexico is a free country. Corrupted but free.

    .....................................

    Q: Why doesn't the military remove those politicians, the ones connected to criminal organizations? Is there not a way to remove those corrupt traitors by some governmental agency or arm?

    ReplyDelete
  42. Some of you people are sooooo ignorant to all of this. This wasn`t a innocent family. They were a narco familiy. The munoz and marrufo,which also left,also backed up cds.these families did the same killing,etc. For all those that say la linea couldn't hang w/ chapo,stop living in lala land!villaahumada is a very strategic point inthe drug route,again it's controlled by juarez cartel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. U know i do believe this, because its weird that some.how they didn't want.people to know they were being scorted out, they were patrolled by a convoy to get to safety. And.rapidly. how many people asked for asylum yet majority of.them.were denied off.
      But then.again.it.could.just ne a.family of wealthy people ,and as we know in any.country the wealthy vet first class help. Regardless of the situation st least lives safe even tho some were lost. Lets get the good side out rather then embracing the bad of it.

      Delete
  43. Why doesn't someone connect jumper cables up to this family's tongue and ears and get the real story out of em?

    ReplyDelete
  44. .

    ... Nueva generación de MariPosas ...

    Hey '7:41 PM August 5',

    If you are visited by Very CRUEL Selfish ANIMALS who deliver to "Your Body" SHOCK / TORTURE, if they want A CONFESSION From You ... 'Y.O.U.' will tell them WHATEVER THEY EXPECT YOU TO TELL THEM "and they / the abusors" will not get TRUTH From YOU!!

    If you want to hear TRUTH from someone, TORTURING THAT PERSON WILL NOT MAKE truth AVAILABLE to you.

    ¿ WHERE HAS CIVILITY AND DECENCY GONE TO?!!?

    Folks, FOLLOW THE GOLDEN RULE: "TREAT all of YOUR CREATOR'S c.r.e.a.t.i.o.n. 'With Respect!'." = Be good & kind to others, B.E. a Sensitive Expression of G.o.d's WILL, La Nueva Generación de MariPosas.

    'F.O.R.G.E.T. the Jumper Cables!!', Plan 'B please!


    María

    ReplyDelete
  45. Plan "b" we deport them immediately.we have enough criminals,and free loaders.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you referring to your immediate family? Please do tell are we supposed to be like cuba and deport all criminals? Or by free loaders are you referring to the black dope dealer your daughter is dating? Or son?

      Delete
  46. August 5, 2012 5:26 PM .
    "This wasn`t a innocent family. They were a narco familiy. The munoz and marrufo"
    Listen to this guy.We all feeling sorry for this family?No,now they are on the losing side,after being traitors and hooking up with Torres Marrufo and Gente Nueva.Its a wonder they didnt all get killed.And guess where they run to?The hated US?
    What a fuckin joke.These people were a narco family,now on the other side.What shit did they get up to when they had the power before it flipped.Did they expect Line,to forgive and forget?Hell no.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Every family in Mexico has connections to drug traffic. They all are making too much money from it to let it go. Most try to mitigate their involvement by claiming their family only grows mj or poppy or their family member is only a lookout or a transporter for the traffickers. The fact is they all make money from the drug trade.

    This family obviously pissed off somebody because they came after them full force. They don't want to talk about it. They just want protection .... from the US ... and they will lie like a rug to get it. But we have seen this before and we have rules that mean something. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  48. The Marine Corps. has a facility in San Diego correct? I think it's high time we go ahead and call ALL of our troops back from the middle east, give the mexican president an ultimatum he'll undoubtedly ignore and go ahead and march. Let's see how bad the cartels are when faced with the 1st Marine division.

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  49. I like that last one. Move EVERYONE south past Panama and make mexico the new California.

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  50. Ok so let's get this straight, people with many businesses and houses were targets after one shot his mouth off. I dont know but, it looks like the 99 percent wanted to take over the 1 percent. plus a little punishment for shooting off his mouth about someone else' brother's death. i cant feel sorry about that mess. we need to push the people past Pananma and build a tiny wall instead of sharing a huge border to the south of our country.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Now you have a family member of Jesus Salas Aguayo, El Chuyin, running for office in Socorro, TX. This should be interesting if Ana Laura Aguayo gets elected. Well she is running under her married name.

    ReplyDelete

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