Wednesday, July 18, 2012

The sun came up (and Chapo was still there)

Denise Dresser

Translated by Borderland Beat reporter un vato)

Y El Chapo? 

Mexico, D.F. (Proceso). 7-16-2012. Today we have a stained election and a country in a waiting mode. Today there are election results that the left wants to question and the Electoral Tribunal will have to legitimize. Today, we have a "virtually" elected president and a portion of the population  that  sees his victory as an imposition. But day after tomorrow, when the post-electoral dust settles, Mexico will awake with the decades-old problems that the state has been dragging, with the political paralysis that the new Executive will have to overcome; the central challenge of how to reduce violence and deal with crime and combat the narcotics traffickers will still be there.

     Few places reflect this as well as Guadalajara. A disputed city. A city that several groups are fighting to control. A place that cartels are dead set on fighting over. A microcosm masterfully portrayed in William Finnegan's New Yorker article titled, "The Kingpins: the Fight for Guadalajara". Where, two days before the International Book Fair, 26 bodies were left under Los Arcos del Milenio. With signs of torture, with "narcomantas" (banners with messages) signed by the Zetas, all signs that it was a challenge to the dominance of the Sinaloa Cartel. "We're in Jalisco and we're not leaving," announced Los Zetas. "This is proof that we have penetrated even as far as the kitchen," they said. They have arrived to dispute control of the market, they told us with their atrocity.

     In Mexico-- Finnegan points out-- it's frequently impossible to know who's behind something: a massacre, a candidacy, a murder, the capture of a crime boss, the "uncovering" of acts of corruption in high places. The truth tends to be too difficult, or too fluid, or too complex to define, or it remains in the hands of the person charged with its manipulation. This explains how a city in the hands of an international crime organization, which is what the Sinaloa Cartel is, continues to be a refuge for fine literature and legitimate economic viability. Both descriptions are accurate and both realities are being threatened by the Zetas. Guadalajara-- like many other areas in the country-- is a territory under siege.

     Guadalajara provides evidence of the cost of a strategy that instead of reducing violence, has contributed to exacerbate it. The murder in 2010 of Ignacio Coronel, the King of Crystal, brought with it the end of the precarious peace that had characterized the city. The Zetas have tried to fill the vacuum by allying themselves aggressively with local groups dissatisfied with the Sinaloa Cartel. The growing number of dead bodies has become the way to send messages. If a corpse lacks a finger, that means that he fingered someone; if the legs are missing, it means he switched gangs; if his tongue is missing, it's because he said something he was not supposed to; if a hand is missing, he was a thief.

     Today, the PRI returns to power, pushed in great measure by the (special) interests it benefited. But it returns to a context (sic) in which there are no longer just a few cartels with which to make pacts or negotiate with. The Calderon strategy of capturing crime bosses has led to fragmentation, to  dispersion, to the rise of smaller and more violent factions. And one can't say that there's a unified government that pursues criminals consistently and forcefully. The low intensity civil war that afflicts the country is taking place among factions with changing loyalties, in towns and cities with interwoven histories. As Finnegan underlines, the "government" has innumerable faces-- starting with more than 200,000 police officers-- and its mechanisms for controlling corruption are too weak. The "narcobillions" permeate every community, every official, every commander. In practice, many at the local level aren't trying to deal with crime, but, rather, they are trying to position themselves in the lead.

     Guadalajara's worst problems aren't related to the explosive growth in the production of methamphetamine, but to inter-gang violence, robbery, growing addiction and the recruitment of young people,. Faced with that, the police are too corrupt to be able to take action. The Army is too distant from the local reality to be able to counterattack. There are few arrests and few convictions. Safety at the local level has deteriorated since the Zetas came.  And, like a local policeman said, "Things have to change or we'll end up like Afghanistan. The new president must change things."

     It's not exactly clear how he's going to do this. The simple fact that El Chapo Guzman remains free after so many years reveals a shift in the balance of power between the State and organized crime. Under the PRI, crime groups prospered, but, at the end of the day, the federal government dictated the terms of their coexistence. There were lines of command that the cartels did not dare cross. Today, they do it with impunity. Nobody in Mexico thinks that the government is in control of the situation, and the street blockages by the narcos a few months ago in Guadalajara suggest clearly that it is not.

     According to recent estimates, El Chapo employs-- directly or indirectly-- 150,000 people. His influence, including his popularity, have grown. Under the PAN, he has become a multimillionaire who appeared in Forbes magazine two years in a row, and his capture would probably have no effect on the buoyant drug market. What's even worse, the power of organized crime in Mexico has taken hostage a great portion of the country's territory, including its principal cities. It terrorizes the rest with a show of violence that is stunning. The Zetas are active in 17, and the Sinaloa Cartel in 16, of the 32 states. That's the reality that Enrique Pena Nieto must deal with. Today, tomorrow and the day after.

38 comments:

  1. Saludos a los Coronels

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  2. The fact that Chapo has been able to remain at large for so long is proof positive that the Mexican government is controlled by the cartels!

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  3. Chapo for president!!! The reality is he creates jobs which revenues money and isn't as violent as scum bag zetas..

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  4. Ya hes.not as violent he just set on fire juarez making it the most dangerouse city in the world, u my good sr. r an idiot

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  5. I DISAGRE WITH THE ARTICLE ABOUT GUADALAJARA BEING IN DISPUTE IT IS OWN BY CDS ANY CARTEL CAN COME TO A CITY AND KILL AND IT DOESNT MEAN THEY ARE DSPUTIN THEY ARE HEATING UP THE PLAZA CHAPO OWN THE JALISCO GOVERMENT THEY GET PAID MONEY AND ARE LOYAL TO HIM THEY HAVE HUNDREDS OF METH LABS JUST IN GUADALAJARA ALONE

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    1. This is 100% true. There is no doubt CJNG and Chapo control Guadalajara. I know because i have family there and was just recently there as well.

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    2. That banner was left in culiacan sinaloa. Not jalisco. Relax bro it was a mistake. Chapo controls everything in mexico from politics to weather. single handedly caused global warming.ect ect..bla bla..when is MEXICO GLgonna close it's borders and deal with OUR PROBLEM. We need to stop blaming everbody else and take our battle to the cartels. Have some huevos. I honestly think that mexico is lost becouse we are Too chickenshit to die for a just cause.. It's gods work we'd be doing

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    3. Ok! You first and we'll all follow.

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    4. My point exactly. Instead of unity we get sarcasm. You cant even be willing to agree from behind ypur computer screen.pathetic WE NEED TO UNITE. maybe mr. Holder still has some guns he wants to get rid of.
      Atte MALCOLM MEX.

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  6. We should ask chapo to let every household have a fully automatic weapon. This way the innocent have a way to defend themselves. What could go wrong? He is mexicos superhero. Also what are your plans once you get deported from the u.s.? Will you still be cheering for a certain cartel? · I dont understand all the fascination with all the dope dealing murder and backstabb. Is it gonna stop then? Once you realize that life in mexico isn't really the RAP VIDEO you thought it was ... Atte tired of bs.

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  7. This blog has recently produced some well written, carefully thought-out pieces on the drug war, such as this one by high-profile Mexico City political analyst Dresser. The security situation in Mexico is a difficult, complicated issue, and cannot be described solely by photos of shot-up vehicles and blood in the streets.

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  8. Keep sending them more money, more arms and more bullets. Eventually they'll get bored. The problem is with the folks who subsidize violence. Cheap Drugs At Any Cost.

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  9. When they sent the message al chapo about being In their kitchen, it wasn't In guadalajara. Get your facts straight chingado

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  10. What is obvious is other cartels have come and gone but Chapo has remained, and only grown stronger. Regardless of what it is that is keeping him out of jail, able to avoid the military, and able to always come out on top in regards to other cartels, his tactics are working. I do not think anyone here is necessarily a cheerleader for him or any cartel, but one thing cannot be disputed and that is he is a lot less barbaric than the Zetas, and that is what is making anyone looking at this situation take his "side". Has he, and his cartel done some incredibly horrible things? Yes. However I think the Mexican people are starting to see that the problem of the cartels will never go away as long as drugs are illegal here in the States, so I am sure they pick a side not based on want, but based on surviving. Rumors have to start somewhere, and usually at least some part of the rumors are usually correct. With that said it seems the rumors of the in fighting within the zetas has some foundation to it, and it is only a matter of time until something happens and they lose to Chapo and the CDG. Are the Knights Templar with CDS/CDG? I believe they are with the Zetas/BL/and Juarez faction. When Mochomo gets out I am guessing things will really heat up, but I would not be surprised if in fighting within the Zetas/BL/Juarez group heated up as well. I am not sure a top leader like Mochomo will want to take orders from Z40, or whoever is running the Juarez Cartel. I think whoever out of Z40 or Lazca makes the deal with Mochomo first and eliminates the other (Z40 or Lazca) will live the longest through this. I do not see Mochomo taking orders of any kind from either Lazca or Z40. I am predicting a big resurgence of the BL once he is out.

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    1. When mochomo getting out? Is it this year?

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    2. DUUUUUDE!!!! TCR GIVE IT A REST ALREADY GEEEEEEZ FIND ANOTHER HOBBY TO DO WHILE YOU'RE HIGH.

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  11. A country ran by gangsters...interesting.

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    1. Looks like usa during n after prohibition

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  12. "when is MEXICO GLgonna close it's borders and deal with OUR PROBLEM. We need to stop blaming everbody else and take our battle to the cartels. Have some huevos. I honestly think that mexico is lost becouse we are Too chickenshit to die for a just cause.. It's gods work we'd be doing"
    I HAD TO SHOW THIS AGAIN TO SHOW EVERYONE THAT NOT ALL MEXICANS WHINE AND BLAME THE US AND JUST ABOUT ANYTHING ELSE THEY CAN THINK OF.
    Saludos to you senore as a proud Mexican.

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  13. July 18, 2012 10:37 PM .
    Dayyum boy,that was some long winded bullshit."When Mochomo get out"fuck mochomo.He be to busy makin sure he doesn't get murked.Cause you read there is a split in the Z you believe it?You believe everything you read and see in the media too?

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  14. Thanks for posting. "The reprisals that people are trying to avoid would come not only from crime groups but, in many cases, from factions within the Mexican government." This too is from the New Yorker article.

    Anyone who would impede wholesale corruption has been murdered. This war with its streets of blood and rolling heads is the bastard child of government & business pimps. Perhaps its just starting and is a good thing as the power pillars must have their heads hacked off so as to start anew.

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  15. Just ask the usa for help, because the capos all need to use their phones they all have family and children who talks to them, the NSA would track down every top drug lord in mexico in less than a year just like Escobar

    You can clearly see it in there EYES the former president and the New president of mexico, there terrified to talk about the cartels or even the most wanted man Chapo, you would think as president you would have the power to sent 10-20 thousand troops to sinoloa and completely fuck shit up not the people just all the marijuana and poppy plant in the mountains, don't they have helicopters with night vision are the mexican soldiers afraid to do night mission in the sinaloa mountains, if anyone who has a gun shoot to kill, if there loyal for chapo then let them die for chapo, the military needs a shoot to kill policy, but nooooo lets go blame the USA because mexico is incapably of wiping their own ass.



    Why is the mexican army incapable of taking over any cartel control state look at Juárez the mexican president should of been impeach for letting that city go straight to hell when chapo men came into town, this is prof that the cartel control the entire government of mexico, Mexico is a completely failed state with the cartel telling the government to just blame the us for the drugs and violence, men like Chapo and Lazca, Z40 has nowhere to hide but in there mansion just like 99% of all the other drug lords, thats the first place the military should start doing some reconnaissance

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  16. This article is just another chronicle of the mess called Mexico, disorganized,corrupt,nationalistic,greedy,autocratic,supersticious,unethical,Question is how many years will it take for true CIVILIZATION to take hold? Chapo just another folk hero criminal every Barrio/Ghetto has one. Mexico will upgrade --someday??

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  17. Mexico will prosper the government in mexico needs to start makin mony too fight the cartels the gov broke in mexico thats why half of the officials are corrupt cant fight corruption wit more corruption that is a recipe foe war felipe calderon vs cartels we know who lost

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  18. Mochomo gets out this year, yes. It has been talked about many times here.

    Very insightful talking about him getting "murked", lol. I am guessing you listen to a lot of rap music and fantasize about this stuff. No doubt Mochomo will have to worry about being killed, most cartel leaders do.

    I think you totally missed the point so I will make it even more clear, Mochomo, I am guessing will not want to take any orders from anyone associated with the z.

    No run along back to your rap music where people get "murked".

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    1. No ceas pendejo el mochomo tiene 4 anos que lo agarraron y le kiero 16 anos de carcel le faltan UN chingo y entonces para ese tienpo su cartelillo va desapareser si alla esta desapareciendo si no fuera por la aliaza que tiene con los mugrozoz y carrillos pero ni a SI pueden con el cds....

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  19. American drug laws are being used to destroy Mexico.

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  20. American drug laws are being used strategically to destroy good old Mexico

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  21. Very well said!

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  22. Know what pisses me off? All the drug using scum bags that make all this possible.

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  23. I see alot of americans complaining, they dont want to risk their troops and stuff over some mexican brawl, they dont want to get involved. I`m confused, what is their plan, to wait until it has spilled over the border and sicarios start knocking on their doors?? Guys, you are allready involved, its there, and its comming for you. You really gonna just sit there and wait? Worst defense ever.

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    1. Who and where asshole.. pur troops are ready willing and able... It's mexicos fucked up govt that wont let us in. our second amendment is our greatest defense PUSSY ..

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  24. Si matan al chapo nada cambea. He has ivan archivaldo and other sons to take his place. Its also the same thing with el mayo; el mayito gordo, and serafin are also ready to take over in case el mayo is killed or captured. They have el chino, cheyo antrax, samuel fuentes, el 50 or soni, los avendano, sargento phoenix, mele antrax, chavo felix, fantasma, and el bravo for security. These fools aren't your average run of the mill zeta, these guys are the real deal. You also have el lic and el mini lic that run drugs with la liebre and el 15. El cheko and el tony control mexicali. El aquiles and la rana control parts of tj. Cds aint going anywhere anytime soon. Imo the only way to effectively hurt all the cartels is to get em financially.

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  25. "American drug laws are being used strategically to destroy good old Mexico"
    Fuckin needs destroying,what a fuckin yard,you can keep that shit.Why the fuck would the US want anything to do with you?You make all them drugs yourself,you kill thousands yourself,but whine like a bitch that it is someone elses fault?
    No stay in Mexico please."good old Mexico"?sheeeeiittt.

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  26. "Know what pisses me off? All the drug using scum bags that make all this possible"
    Know what pisses me off?Mexicans making all those drugs and causing all this violence.

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  27. "I see alot of americans complaining, they dont want to risk their troops and stuff over some mexican brawl, they dont want to get involved. I`m confused, what is their plan, to wait until it has spilled over the border and sicarios start knocking on their doors??"
    Thats exactly what we gonna do,the US is not Mexico.Anyone comes near my door,and they gettin pieces blown out their face and head.This aint Mexico.

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  28. @ July 20, 2012 9:21 PM
    Anonymous said...
    Si matan al chapo nada cambea. He has ivan archivaldo and other sons to take his place. Its also the same thing with el mayo;....

    Cheyo Antrax is dead...but i see your point they also have all the people from Guamuchil (El Cholo) and surrounding areas like Mocorito and all of the Sierra...Southern Culiacan (Pueblos Unidos,Cosala, El Salado) is all controlled as well (Felix/Zambada, etc.)

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