Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War

49 Kidnappings Per Day Occurred in Mexico in 2011

Monday, January 2, 2012 |


An average of 49 kidnappings per day occurred in Mexico in 2011, marking a significant increase from the prior year, the Council for Law and Human Rights, or CLDH, said.

A total of 17,889 kidnappings occurred in Mexico last year, up 32 percent from the 13,505 abductions registered in 2010, the non-governmental organization said.

“It is important to note that official complaints to the authorities have remained at a rate of one for every 10 cases,” said CLDH president Fernando Ruiz in an e-mail.

The figures do not included “express kidnappings,” in which a victim is held for only a few hours, the CLDH said.

Hundreds of express kidnappings occur in Mexico City daily, with taxi drivers usually assisting the criminals, the NGO said.

Kidnapping gangs are increasingly using technology to target victims, and some criminals have negotiated the payment of ransom with victims’ relatives outside the country, the CLDH said.

“That is, some gangs of kidnappers have influence at the international level, making it impossible to obtain a partial identification of their members and capture them,” the NGO said.

The number of kidnapping cases in which police and soldiers were involved rose from 70 percent in the first half of 2011 to 80 percent in the second half of the year, the CLDH said.

“Their level of participation ranges from leaking information about a victim’s profile to providing protection during the actual kidnapping and directly carrying out the kidnapping,” Ruiz said.

About one-third of the kidnappers arrested by the Federal Police, according to official figures, have links to drug cartels.

The CLDH, which was founded in 1991, provides assistance to kidnapping and extortion victims, and works to root out corruption in the ranks of the police.

The Associated Press

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9 Borderland Beat Comments:

Anonymous said...

That is despicable and Mexican the government can't do anything about that because? What? The government sanctions it because they are doing it or what is the score on this? Please answer? I really don't get this? 42 a day? That is so embarrassing that a country has so little control. What do they just not care or this is how they help the economy. They are already letting cartels make money! Shameful, shameful, shameful Mexico!

Anonymous said...

I guess his family didnt value his life enough to pay the moola.

ajulio said...

The number of kidnappings in mexico is higher than 49 if you include missing persons and some homicides. Expect more mexicans preying on americans in 2012.

Anonymous said...

To anonymous 5:45 pn, Jan 2,

Ditto, what does the Mexican government expect if the people can't trust the police and military? This report is troubling in the report that the percentage of kidnappings with police and military involvement is up drastically. I was under the impression that the Mexican people had a great deal of confidence in the military. If you recruit from a delinquent population you get a corrupt military and police. What hope do the people of Mexico have? Mexico sounds worse than Afganistan. Who will lead the purge?

Anonymous said...

Hell lets legalize kidnapping and tax it,those rich people don't pay enough taxes anyway, they owe the poor. Bullshit at some point Mexicans must rise up,Will they do it in July 2012,or not, we will see!! The problem in Mexico is a culture that tolerates crime even against its own citizens.

Anonymous said...

"The problem in Mexico is a culture that tolerates crime ..."

The problem in Mexico is a culture that loves crime.

Anonymous said...

Are the top two photos from an "Unsolved Mysteries" reenactment piece?

Anonymous said...

Ok, so you create a task force on kidnappings. Now lets set an automatic sentence, how about life without parole or death sentence for capital crimes.

Anonymous said...

i was wondering my nephew is 3 years old and i was wondering if its safte if my nephew goes over their her is leaving from tj with my dad and brother(12) Mexico City

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