Sunday, September 25, 2011

Drug trafficking greatest threat to Latin American countries today, UN hears

UN - Costa Rica and El Salvador, two countries highly affected by drug-related violence in recent years, have urged the United Nations to help fight drug cartels and organized crime, and called on Member States with high numbers of drug consumers to take the lead on the issue.

“Our region has become prey to malevolent geopolitics,” Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla Miranda told the General Assembly’s annual general debate last night.

“As a result of our location between the largest centres of production and demand in the world, we have become a target to the dynamic of death that they both create, and we must bear the burden of extraordinary material, institutional and human costs What for the main perpetrators of these atrocities are mere ‘collateral damages,’ for Central Americans represent extreme challenges and deep wounds.”

Ms. Chinchilla added: “From here stems our greatest frustration. Thus we demand that the international community, in particular the greatest consumers of drugs and suppliers of arms that materialize the violence, assume completely and without further delay, the responsibility of their actions.”

El Salvador’s President Mauricio Funes echoed his Costa Rican counterpart’s call for international support and stressed that drug trafficking affects not just Latin America but every country where drugs are obtained illegally.

“The international community must understand that it also suffers from this problem,” he said in his address today. “There is no nation in the world where there hasn’t been a drug consumer that has obtained drugs from the hand of criminal drug networks.”

He also said that Central American countries will continue to combat drug trafficking by strengthening their institutions, seeking transparency in their security bodies, and helping young people stay away from gangs. But he stressed that there would be no progress without the leadership of consumer countries, and called on the United States to take immediate measures.

“El Salvador and Central America are making great efforts to face this reality but the numbers are not on our side,” he said.

“We are talking about a drug trade route that moves about $100,000 million per year, and that culminates in the biggest market in the world and the main consumer of these substances: the United States. Not even a big country like Mexico can take a step on its own and have any possibilities of success in this battle in the face of such a terrorist threat.

“The battle against organized crime is everyone’s fight and in this sense, I would like to make a special appeal to the United Sates so that it assumes a resolute and concrete leadership in this battle against drug trafficking and organized crime.”

22 comments:

  1. 100,000 million per year? A VAST understatement.

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  2. Here is their problem in a nut shell: "Ms. Chinchilla added: “From here stems our greatest frustration. Thus we demand that the international community, in particular the greatest consumers of drugs and suppliers of arms that materialize the violence, assume completely and without further delay, the responsibility of their actions.”

    YOUR country needs to step to the plate and say that you are half the problem. SUPPLY AND DEMAND! Canada isn't cutting heads off with chainsaws and dumping dozens of bodies in the road! YOU are the countries that have, WITH VIOLENCE, taken the worlds lead in supplying that demand! Germany isn't making submarines and sending them over! Spain isn't taking fellow Spaniards, extorting their families, leaving them to die in the AZ deserts, and killing anyone who has an opposing opinion.

    The second the US ever stops the war on drugs and takes a different approach is the day South America will see a wave of violence that makes these times seem tame! The cartels will loose their cash cow, and will be forced to do whatever it takes to keep up their standard of living! Extortion and kidnaping will be at an all time high! The US will have the money to tighten up the border, and there will be no were to go! You will have to finally take up arms and fight for your countries back from the criminals, and the corruption that runs these governments! Mexico's future must have a new day of independence that they will celebrate! A civil war that will take care of the problem in and of itself! Sadly, that means leaving it all up to Mexicans, and then it will be back to whoever has the most money.

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  3. Once again it's the good old USA that's at fault. We do the most drugs and supply all the guns.

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  4. You can't eliminate demand straight up so the only option is to choke off as much of the supply as possible coming into the USA. Human smuggling and drug smuggling occupy the same geographic vectors so you can't reduce one without reducing the other. This is the conumdrum for politicians in both the USA and SA.

    Building an Israeli style security fence would cut down greatly on the supply of drugs, but it would have a similar effect on illegal immigration. Many politicians in the USA are against a comprehensive fence because they gain political favor by not trying to stop illegal immigration. They also produce anchor babies who will one day vote for them. It is a long term demographic strategy.

    SA politicans wouldn't want an Israeli style fence either because over time the billions of dollars their countries receive back in wire transfers from the USA would dwindle as fewer illegal aliens make it to the USA to work.

    So the bottom line is do not expect a real solution from our politicians.

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  5. The United States needs to tack that leadership role in a big way or some one else will,like Hugo and friends in Bolivia and Nicaragua.
    And lets not forget Hugo as friends in Iran and Russia, I'm sure they will be happy to help him out.

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  6. Just Fucking Legalize the shit, the U.S.crackheads wont stop, the suppliers wont stop supplying, just Legalize the shit already!

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  7. No Legalizing it is a waste of time.. You De Criminalize it !! Legalizing it will only cause the Taxation to be so ridiculously high that you create more issues... but now that I have put that on the internet were all screwed.. If all the Cartels sat down and divided all the billions they had and all the resorts they owned, they could retire.. problem solved.. Supply the Greedy government and be done with it :D

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  8. Drug addicts are not born, someone turns them on to these Drugs first, so do tell little Lady, who made created the demand ?.

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  9. By asking the US to step up and take responsibility are you inviting us to invade you ?, hmmm I don't think so.

    Any actiion the US takes will be precieved as aggression, sorry but our hands are tied, but you could help but not creating more addicts.

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  10. The cabron at 3:34pm has it wrong. She is from Costa Rica, not Mexico. And Costa Rica is a victim too, not a producer nor trafficer. One of the problems we have in the USA is illiterates who don't read more than headlines, if they can even read at all.

    Legalize it and take the wind out of the sails of the narcos and corrupt politicians, government and their paid enforcers, the cops. A country out of control - the USA - will not be able to control or stop anything. Let the addicts kill themselves. Less life will be lost letting addicts die than are lost in the fight against drugs. Let freedom ring!

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  11. I'm all for legalizing it (de-crimializing), but this isn't going to take the wind out of the sails of the cartels. It might slow it down to a breeze, but they still make a shit load of money from their other 'creative' ventures. I mean, who takes their own fellow citizens-fellow Mexican compatriots, and leaves them to die in the desert? Or lies to them and tells them Phoenix is just a days walk? Or allows the 'rape trees' in the desert without trying to put a stop to it? WHO? That's like slaves helping other slaves to escape, but raping them and shaking them down before putting them on the underground railway! But I guess, the Mexican people are the slaves, and the Mexicans putting the hurt on them are the slave masters.

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  12. I am not an America basher but I agree that we need to take a larger role. First by setting a baseline on both drugs and immigration. Secure our borders! Then tie welfare and other govenment handouts to drug testing. It won't be perfect, but it's a start. Then get tough on dealers. We all know that drugs are available in every town in the U.S. Why not prioritize their elimination? Once our borders are secure, address undocumented immigration in a meaningful way. Not amnesty. Require self-registration under threat of longterm or permanent lock-out. Those who comply could gain guest worker status. Don't balk people, they already are 'guest workers'. Then help Mexico gain a national police force that is vetted and trained. There would have to be checks and balances against corruption like assigment out of home town area. "not our problem?", just wait and see.

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  13. everyone seems to miss a key point which is the inflated price of cocaine as a result of U.S. policy (drug policy). To able to understand the imaginary margin created by this you only need to look at another item that originates from the same local and product for example coffee which to a certain extend has addictive properties but is not classified as any type of drug so it basically trade globally at a rate of about 1.20lb still generating a whopping $80 billion market but mainly controlled by a couple of large cartels (legal) now if you can say the lb of coffee cost 1.20us originating from columbia or venzuela then one could assume that a kilo of cocaine would cost 2.50us in a real world scenario it would probrably would be less considering the ration of demand which is a margin of compared coffee users. The sheer economics of this would make it unprofitable for small-medium dealers to compete on any scale of production and distribution, you would actually need a huge cartel (legal) to make a sizable profit for this product. So to the point the inflation policies which are in place and highly invested in make cocaine a $2.50k product a $15,000.00 product a whopping 1,700% or so profit margin. So is the product that is wrong or the concept?

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  14. The U.N. is just as corrupt as the Mexican government, just as corrupt as the Mexican police, as the Mexican Military, just as corrupt as the American government, just as corrupt as the American Military, just as corrupt as American police, as American sheriffs, as american state troopers, DEA, FBI, CIA, and all the Judges that are bought by these DTOs. What does this mean?....It means we're fucked...We are slaves to their fear tactics, to their extortions, to their drug pushers in our communities, to the criminal element that follows, the stupid whores prostituting at the clubs, at the street, snatching up our daughters and turning them out to dance on the pole, all the anchor babies and natives giving Mexicans and Hispanics a bad name. A culture devoid of all culture. Hollow, lifeless, only out to satisfy itself in depravity

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  15. I did not see any mention of ending Prohibition in her comments. So to my ears, it all sounded like "blah blah blah".

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  16. @ 8:58 pm $2.50 to $15000 is a HUGE profit. but consider by the time is gets to where I live, its selling for $40,000+kg. I dont believe anyone involved in this at any level wants to see it legalized and given the golden rule, which is he who has all the gold, makes all the rules, the legal classification of these commodities isnt going to change anytime in any of our lifetimes IMO

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  17. And what does the UN do???? NOTHING! Where are the UN Peacekeepers? Or shall I say Warmakers? They are a useless Organization. The Bloodletting in Mexico is the same as what the UN tolerated and let continue to happen in Rawanda, Cour de Voire and Katanga in Africa.

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  18. ALL they are is ANOTHER armed wing of the Sinaloa cartel, they are attempting to manipulate the government and the people with all that "We are the good guys" nonsense! El Chapo and Sinaloa has been singing that same bullshit song for years and its ALL LIES! They are just as brutal, violent and danferous as ANY cartel in Mexico, it was them that dumped 40 bodies in Veracruz recently! Dont be fooled by there B.S.

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  19. Thats like going to court and telling the judge "Your honor, it is the ault of my customers that I sell drugs!" You would be laughed out of the courtroom, GUNS do NOT kill people its the RETARD thats pulling the trigger! Mexico stop trying to pass off the responsibilities for what is happening in YOUR country! Its a Mexican on Mexican PROBLEM!

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  20. We have the technology to identify drug users,many working people take drug tests regularly, WHY DOES THE USA REFUSE TO IDENTIFY AND CHALLANGE DRUG USERS?? Is it a Democratic party thing, WHY? The USA is bankrupt in 2010 govt figures claim 41 cents out of every dollar spent by Fed. Borrowed or created out of thin air, and we are coddling DOPERS,4th generation welfare people, single women with 3-5 children with 5 different fathers none paying support, Latinos crossing border pregnant to deliver in emergency room, a new American citizen paid for by Medicade 10,000 a pop WTF WE need to stand up raise the standards in the US, its not OK to be a doper,alcohalic,live off welfare, a taker. YES the USA needs to get rid of drug use, also low class imigrants, who win the lottery when they imbed themselves in this God Awful Welfare State. Calderon you are right ,USA stop using Drugs, but Mexicans the USA is not your Promised Land,you must pay taxes,no underground cash, you must pull your weight, help support the old time minoritys ,just like the GRingos.

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  21. What?!? Don’t start blaming the U.S. for Mexico’s internal problems...Focus on eradicating corruption within your entire administration (military, courts, police etc. etc. etc.). If the common people cannot receive fairness or justice from its administration they will turn around and make their own justice. Mexico’s entire administration (and many other Latin countries) has set a horrible example for its people and for many many years!

    Yes there is corruption within the U.S., but sometimes our corrupt officials and individuals are brought to justice with positive changes being made...seeing this gives the general population “HOPE” they too can fight for justice without retaliation. But not in Mexico. People who speak against corruption there will often disappear & are never found; while Calderon & police speak lip service about justice, and then case is closed leaving whole families to grieve for a lifetime. Mexico has even allowed its news media to become so intimidated, it now is afraid to report the news!! A free press is the cornerstone for a free nation!

    No No No Ms. Chinchilla and Calderon...U.S. should not be brought in to help clean up your savage mess. Somehow someway Mexico’s (and other Latin countries) focus should be on eradicating injustice from all levels of its govenment, starting from the TOP DOWN!!

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  22. You guys who think the US doesn't have a stake in this are very ignorant. This is the biggest market for drugs and that is the main problem. Did the cartels come to be and create a market in the US for drugs? Or was there a market in the US for drugs and the cartels came to be? This WAR ON DRUGS is political BS here in the US and in MEXICO. You should really know what you're talking about before you spew your idiotic rhetoric out in public.

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