Friday, September 17, 2010

El Diario photography intern shot and killed in Juárez

By Adriana Gómez Licón
El Paso Times
A photography intern for El Diario de Juarez newspaper was shot and killed Thursday, September 16, 2010, outside the Rio Grande Mall, between Lopez Mateos and Triunfo de la Republica Ave., in north Jurez.

A photography intern for the El Diario de Juárez newspaper was shot and killed today outside the Rio Grande Mall in north Juárez.
Luis Carlos Santiago, 21, had been working for El Diario for about six months.

A photography intern for El Diario de Juarez newspaper was shot and killed Thursday, September 16, 2010, outside the Rio Grande Mall, between Lopez Mateos and Triunfo de la Republica Ave., in north Jurez. Luis Carlos Santiago, 24, died at the scene while another unidentified victim, also an intern, was wounded and taken to a local hospital. Both were riding in a gray NIssan Platina.

A second photography intern for El Diario was also shot and is in a hospital in stable condition, officials said.

The shooting happened about 2:30 p.m. The two interns had been at the mall having lunch during a break from a photography workshop, officials said.

In other news in CD Juarez:

Gunmen in Juárez kill family of four, including 2 teens

By Adriana Gómez Licón
El Paso Times
Posted: 09/15/2010 02:21:20 PM MDT

A family of four was killed this morning in Juárez, state police said.

Marco Antonio Barraza Hinojo, 45, his wife, Norma Delia Ramírez Leyva, 39, and their teenage daughters Rosa Aidé Barraza Ramirez and Norma Margarita Barraza Ramírez, were shot dead about 6:30 a.m. in a southern neighborhood near the Juárez airport.

Gunmen apparently entered the home and began shooting while some of the family members were still asleep.

3 women shot, killed in Juárez home

By Daniel Borunda
El Paso Times
Posted: 09/14/2010 05:22:00 PM MDT

Three women were gunned down at about noon today inside a home in east Juárez, police said.
Chihuahua state police counted 34 bullet casings at a house at Manuel J. Clouthier and Fresa streets in colonia Granjero. The victims were shot multiple times. They were identified as Brenda Guillen Ramirez, 25, Yuridia Guillen Ramirez, 23, and Yolanda Ramirez Quiroz, 45.

There was no motive disclosed for the shooting.

Women have increasingly become victims as a drug cartel war has raged in Juárez for more than two years. A suspected hit man told Mexican authorities recently that the Juárez drug cartel was recruiting women to work as killers.

Juárez traffic officer shot dead in morning attack

By Adriana Gómez Licón
El Paso Times
Posted: 09/14/2010 12:12:16 PM MDT

 Two Juárez traffic officers, a woman and a man, were shot in an attack about 10:30 a.m. north of the city, said city spokesman Jaime Torres.

The two motorcycle officers were sent to the hospital, but the woman died soon after. The male officer was listed in stable condition.

19 comments:

  1. 21 y/o...a baby...my heart is breaking!
    But photography interns? newbies? Something not right here...something more than the obvious.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Gunning down a journalist is one of the most cowardly acts anyone can commit.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Not just gunning down journalist but what about these a family including teenagers, women, and traffic officers for what ever reason(s) is cowardly. Cowardly is that in all of these stories there is no evidence that all these victims were armed and attacking the people who killed them like they were attacked and killed.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank heaven for living in the the United States
    of America, the Second Amendment of the US constitution and living in the great state of Texas. Here you can carry a concealed weapon if you qualify, for protection,in any caliber and nearly anywhere within the law. The citizens of Mexico live at the whim of the criminals. La jente de Mejico se tiene que levantar y darle en la madre a esos ciminales. El gobierno mejicano no pude hacer todo.

    ReplyDelete
  5. It takes courage to step onto the front line of this kind of hell - a brave young soul taken down by cowards. Rest in peace.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It has just been announced the gray Nissan Platina Luis Carlos Santiago was driving belonged to the State inspector of the Commission of Human Rights, Gustavo de la Rosa Hickerson.

    http://puentelibre.mx/not_detalle.php?id_n=50225

    According to the report, Luis Carlos Sandovel was a very close friend of de la Rosa Hickerson's son and was considered part of the family.

    ReplyDelete
  7. @ Ovemex

    I KNEW IT!!! As you can see by my post it made no sense that this young man was the target!

    Thanks Mijo, not that he is any less dead, but I had another horrible conclusion in my mind...

    ReplyDelete
  8. "Luis Carlos Santiago, 21, had been working for El Diario for about six months"

    "Luis Carlos Santiago, 24, died at the scene while another unidentified victim"

    So was he 21 or 24? lol

    ReplyDelete
  9. @10:27

    I noticed that also, but really it does not matter...right? He was a baby either way, cheated of 40-60 yrs of life

    ReplyDelete
  10. @ Buela Chivis:

    Here's a bit of info on de la Rosa Hickerson. Seems last year he sought temporary refuge in the U.S., not because of cartel threats, but because of threats from the Mexican Military.

    Apparently he has documented hundreds of military abuse cases in Juarez.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113899756

    http://www.larednoticias.com/noticias.cfm?n=33944

    http://www.larednoticias.com/noticias.cfm?n=33956

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  11. It doesn't matter how old he was. What really matters is the fact that he was killed for no reason whatsoever.

    Whether he was a journalist, a photographer intern, a taxi driver, nothing justifies his death.

    I still don’t fathom/understand how the entire country is not fed up yet. By that, I mean every single Mexican citizen, rich or poor.

    Sure, the outrage has been growing, but it hasn’t reached a boiling point yet. Is everyone waiting for tragedy to strike them directly?

    Why wait?

    Sitting and waiting, doesn’t resolve anything. And tomorrow, it won’t be an intern, it may be your family, your friend, or quite frankly, it may be you.

    ReplyDelete
  12. @Ovemex

    Thank you for the links...& wow this gets more heartbreaking by each report.

    @Valentina
    Did you check out the links Ovemex posted? This answers your question why the outrage has not "reached the boiling point" I have placed myself into harms waymany times for example by recently reporting the abuse of a disabled child who lives with her mom in a cartel house. I took a leap of faith using my real name not knowing if those I spoke to were "connected"and demanded investigation of human rights and child abuse violations, not only by local DIF but State capital DIF and Gov office and Human rights commision. If I did not use my name nothing would be done. My staff refused to report it, and I understand why, they begged me not to, but how could I not? A simple thing like this scares the shit out of my staff and friends who now worry even more about my safety.

    Here is the clincher...even if those who apply for asylum in the US are given such, cartels or whomever they then proceed to the extended families for retaliation...so I am not understanding how this can possibly work, how can the applicants throw their families under the bus to gain their personal safety?

    ReplyDelete
  13. buela......it's called self preservation the basis of all human exsistence...many would like to be believe that each person is so noble but when your life is threatened you will save yourself.

    ReplyDelete
  14. buela......you like patting yourself on the back
    obviously but you offer no real insight or solutions....

    ReplyDelete
  15. @ 2:48

    Exactly! I completely agree and I must be honest if my family lived & worked in Mx, not just me, I doubt that I would make the calls that put me in danger. I do understand, and that is the issue of "why", si? I wanted Valentina & others to understand this.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Mexico has reached a point of no return. Its time for a civil war. the good people need to plan and get together take up arms and protect themselves and their families from the drug lords and those in office,or who serve to protect, who abuse their powers

    ReplyDelete
  17. @ 2:50

    Wow grouchy how can you conclude that? follow the thread. I was simply illustrating that my friends, neighbors, and employees in Mx cannot call and be vocal because of fear of reprisal. If one has a family how can the chance be taken? WIth me I will take chances because my family is safe in other countries. BUT, putting that aside, who would not make that call to help a almost 8 y/o totally blind child, sexually, physically, emotionally abused, covered with head and body lice and bruises? WOuldn't you? of course anyone with conscience would...AS LONG as their family would be safe. You know what my employees said? "I am sorry I love my job but I cannot do this I know I may be fired" Every single one of them refused and I understood and waited 2 days to think about it myself. It was an awful situation. As for no solutions, maybe you are correct but I try my best and will not attack you or anyone else trying to do the same. My building schools, kitchens and therapy centers in Mx for 7 yrs is my solution.

    and what do you do?

    ReplyDelete
  18. La Linea put up banners naming varios police (supposedly federal police) and threatening them if they didnt "return the money" they'd end up like the "two journalist"

    http://el-blog-del-terror.blogspot.com/2010/09/la-linea-se-atribuye-ejecucion-de.html

    ReplyDelete
  19. Here's another interesting bit of information. De la Rosa was investigating the death and gathering evidence of a man who had been detained by Federal police on Aug. 27:

    "Gustavo de la Rosa reportó el pasado 31 de agosto estar reuniendo evidencias sobre el homicidio de Arnulfo Antúnez Sandoval, un hombre que fue detenido por elementos de la Policía Federal y que el pasado 27 de agosto apareció sin vida.
    Sobre el caso de Antúnez, De la Rosa dijo hace dos semanas haber reunido “las evidencias que vinculan a la Policía Federal con la detención y la localización del vehículo y del cadáver”.

    http://lavozdejuarez.com/17597/%C2%BFy-si-no-era/

    ReplyDelete

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