Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War

3 Teenagers Die in Reynosa Shooting

Friday, June 4, 2010 |


A group of students, all minors, were shot and killed by the Mexican Army after having been pursued as they traveled aboard a white Ram truck on the Reynosa-Nuevo Laredo highway.

It was Wednesday around 2:00 PM when, according to witnesses and relatives, a group of at least 4 teenagers dressed in their school uniforms left their school, General Fran. Mugica high school.

Soldiers gaurding the area of the shooting said that the occupants of the pick-up truck were acting suspiciously when warning shots were fired to stop the vehicle, but apparently the students chose to flee. After a brief chase soldiers overtook the pickup and more shots were fired into the vehicle.

The chase ended at Estacion Anzalduas where the students resided.

Three deaths were confirmed at the site of the shooting. According to information from El Universal, the dead were identified by relatives as Daniel Hernandez age 13, Cesar Cuellar age 15 and Alejandro Eduardo Cuellar the driver of the pickup and 17 years of age.

There were differing accounts of 1 or 2 surviving passengers of the vehicle taken away from the area by the military. At the site a woman who identified herself to be mother of one of the occupants was in tears as she complained that the soldiers threatened her and did not let her go see her son.

The road was blocked for several hours as the soldiers waited for the civil authorities and evidence gathering team to arrive which caused a major traffic stoppage on the main road paralleling the border with the U.S.

Although the incident took place late on Wednesday so far there has been no official version of the events reported by the military. The causes of the chase, the number of surviving youths detained, or if they were armed all remains unknown.

Share it:

15 Borderland Beat Comments:

Anonymous said...

Wow, yet another incident in which the military is involved...I wonder what their excuse will be this time other than:

"Soldiers gaurding the area of the shooting said that the occupants of the pick-up truck were acting suspiciously when warning shots were fired to stop the vehicle, but apparently the students chose to flee."

How can the soldiers tell if a 13yr old, 17 yr old, etc are acting suspicious inside a truck???????? And the poor kids probably fled because they heard shots and thought a shootout was about to start and probabley FLED to avoid being caught in the middle...but little did they know they were considered the opposing team.

Anonymous said...

They were in a a narco favorite 4 door full size pick-up, tinted windows rolled up and they fled. Completely stupid. It was a terrible mistake on the teenager's part.

Why in the world, after numerous warnings the cartels have given the public to not drive around in suvs/trucks with tinted windows, would their parents let them drive around in that narco truck? This time it was the army who shot, next time it will be a cartel.

May they RIP. Hopefully this will serve as a wake-up call to parents to not allow their kids to play cowboys and indians.

Anonymous said...

a scared teenager not having enough sence to know if it is real military or cartels acting like military. A military greatly outmatched in intelligence and arsenal, too scared to take a chance and be killed. This time the people must unit and flood Calderons office to hold the military responsible and punish them instead of sweeping under the table

Anonymous said...

My concern is that as long as the general public of Mexico tolerates wholesale criminal activity as part of everyday life these tragedys will continue. This was a horrible mistake, however if Mexico employs US rules of engagment subject to the same political showboating as the US it will be a huge negative. Poor Kids Poor FamilysI,m very sad for them--

Anonymous said...

ok yea its tragic but mistakes happen and narcos kill hundreds of kids including a three year old just day before yesterday they kill with impunity the truth is they were riding a white pick up truck with tinted windows and fled what do you expect the soldiers to think they are living in a certified war zone. Maybe next time you need to think about who the real bad guys are and not be so quick to jump on the men and women who put there life on the line everyday for mexico while a bum like you sits at the computer and criticizes them for making and honest however tragic mistake when you the grow the cajones to do their job then youll have room to speak.

Anonymous said...

i would like to ask anonymous if they reside in mexico or the usa it is not very smart to drive new trucks in mexico because the cartels used them get around what under age kids driving around in them

Anonymous said...

This is another example of undisciplined, uneducated soldiers murdering innocent civilians, school children in school uniforms! The military checkpoints are frightening experiences and the soldiers are very ambiguous in their instructions to the cars, letting traffic flow freely in one direction and stopping traffic in the other direction. The Mexican public is tired of this "war" which causes suffering to the people and not to the criminals. That is one of the reasons that the PAN party is being voted out of office throughout Mexico. People are tired of the violence. The military has only perpetuated the violence, not reduced or stopped it.

Prior to Calderon, there was peace and quiet in the north of Mexico. Calderon is a weak president who is doing the bidding of the U.S. who are incapable of controlling drug traffic and drug use in the U.S.

Anonymous said...

Come on Anonymous 1..............Not deny that this is a tragic incident that needs to be investigated....your "theory" is just based on pure speculation (no facts) and wanting to place the blame on the military.....what is sadly forgetten is that the military is involved because the drug cartels have created this horrible situation in Mexico which results in tragedies like this......

GC said...

There was a military check point and the students turn around. I believe that the truck was a RAM 2 cabin, pretty popular between narco people.
Here in Mexico there's no order, you can see a 12 year old driving alone or trucks with window tinting that you can't see anything from the outside.
I have a 4 doors truck but i dont drive it for now, im planning to sell it. Theres no way i let my child drive it. But thats me.

Anonymous said...

violence is been there forever in mexico, but now drug cartels are fighting omong each other that's why tere are 2 many killings. The "PAN" party doesn't have anything to do with that. if you are sop by soldiers you need to obey the order they are giving you, if not there are the consequencies.

alberto said...

We you let you kid driven around on war zone that is stupid they can get hurt by mistake

alberto said...

This is a war do not blame to mexican army they doinng their job ,that is the parent fault let kid driven around. In a war zone

Anonymous said...

here we go again...another check point incident because the person driving the vehicle refused to stop...CHECKPOINT = STOP!!! What happened to this kids is unfortunate, but what was the military supposed to do? If they shot at the tires to just make the vehicle stop, and had the people inside the truck actually been armed men, the military would have been attacked by them!

Anonymous said...

here is another act upon not really thinking on both parties. the parents letting their kids drive around in a high profile vehicle knowing what is going on in the drug war in mexico is just pathetic. when will society learn to think before responding to their actions.

Anonymous said...

No excuses for the soldiers! Idiots who chose to shoot before evaluating the situation to protocol!! These a**holes should be murdered in the same manor for allowing their peanut brain to swell up once a fire arm is in their possesion.

Post a Comment

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com