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Friday, January 20, 2023

Why Tire Repair Workshops Are the Target of a Wave of Violence in Guanajuato, Mexico

Guest Contributor for Borderland Beat

This article is a shortened synopsis of “Why Tire Repair Workshops Are the Target of a Wave of Violence in Guanajuato, Mexico” by the Small Wars Journal. For the complete article and dataset, click here.

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This article analyzes an under-examined facet of the CSRL – CJNG conflict in Guanajuato: the use of tire repair shops as fronts for criminal activity. Over the last ten years, at least 138 tire repair shops have been violently attacked in the Mexican state of Guanajuato, leaving over 200 dead. An analysis of crime data, news reports, and local security experts suggests that these attacks are related to the fight between organized crime groups.

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Tire repair shop attacks in Guanajuato by city (2013-2022).

Long considered one of the most peaceful and safe states in Mexico, a brutal conflict between a local organized crime group, the Cartel Santa Rosa de Lima (CSRL), and the Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generación (CJNG) has made it the most violent state in Mexico by homicide count since 2018. So far this year, Guanajuato has recorded 2,471 homicides, about 10% of the nation's total, according to government data. Much of the violence is fueled by the fight between these two groups and their allies for control of the state's lucrative Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex) pipelines and an expanding market of synthetic drug consumers.

Home to a Pemex refinery and extensive pipelines, Guanajuato has a long history of fuel theft. Also, experts and state crime data suggest that Guanajuato is undergoing a synthetic drug use crisis, supplied by both CJNG and CSRL methamphetamine.

It is within this context that both criminal groups have been attacking tire repair shops (vulcanizadoras in regional Spanish) to strike at each other's drug dealing and stolen gasoline rackets. A review of local press reports reveals that since 2013, there have been at least 138 brutal attacks on these tire shops in the state, causing 213 deaths. The victims are often the owners, employees, and customers of the businesses. Most attacks have occurred since 2018, at the height of the CSRL-CJNG war. 

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Most of the attacks fall into two methods: ‘shop invasions’ or ‘drive-by’ attacks. Both occur during the day, when the shop is open, often with customers inside. In some cases, the attackers will spread flame accelerants or throw hand grenades to light the business on fire. The objective is to quickly cause as many casualties and damage as possible before fleeing the scene. 

An analysis of the modus operandi of the events reveals that attackers use a variety of methods of attack, all with similar elements including:

  • Targeted hits against owners – while the attackers had no qualms about killing customers, in most cases their objective was to kill the owners and employees.
  • Speed and surprise are paramount – most attacks lasted only a few moments, from the drive up to getaway. As a result, hardly any attackers are arrested.
  • Time of attack - attacks almost always occur during the day when employees and customers are on site.
  • Attacks are often publicized after the attack – signed narco messages, taking of photos, and the timing of attacks suggests that the attacks are meant to be publicized. Criminal groups want the public to know they were behind the attack.

These tire shop attacks are linked to this turf war between criminal groups. According to an interview with David Saucedo, the attacks are the result of a targeted campaign by both criminal groups to destroy each other's economic engines, as the tire shops are used as sites for the dealing of meth and stolen gasoline. When interviewed, Saucedo said that the CSRL began the practice, noticing the opportunity that tire shops held. According to Saucedo: “When a motorist takes his vehicle to repair a flat tire, the seller of the tire repair shop also sells them two things: blue glass (meth) and stolen fuel at a good price obviously.”

Source: Small Wars Journal

25 comments:

  1. @HEARST --> FYI:

    https://ioangrillo.substack.com/p/the-goshen-massacre-and-the-specter

    ReplyDelete
  2. If i lived in these dangerous states and had a business and knew they are attacking them i would be on top of a roof all the time with a gun ready to blast them instead of getting mowed down like a target practice object i would go out fighting. People in Mexico need to be armed fuck the government they planned this out for the genocide.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cartels will find an opening out of the 24 hours 365 window still I applaud your braveness

      Delete
    2. @9.11 Yeah yeah, experienced locals are getting hit but you'd do it differently. If you'd read the whole article you'd know that they often do go out fighting. I'm sure you'd carry a grenade in your pocket too, which would stop them kidnapping YOU! Please...

      Delete
  3. That type of business allows it to operate as a surveillance site, front business to sell drugs, storage, or so... specially if open 24hrs.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lots in TJ, junk yards are same

    Used car lots

    ReplyDelete
  5. Fox news is reporting Mexican Authorities found
    the bodies of the Jose Guitirrez from Ohio and
    his bride to be along with the other two people.
    They Disappeared Christmas. Very sad news

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And we covered it

      https://www.borderlandbeat.com/2023/01/tepetongo-zacatecas-4-bodies-found-in.html

      Delete
  6. Many bars as well, just like here in the US.
    I've been to many bars in arizona, California and Texas and most sell crystal and Coke

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nonsense.Maybe some patron there sells but not the bar itself.And it's not most.

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    2. If we look at the wording, I suppose it could be true that Most of the Many bars 11:58 has been to sell his favorite mocos locos. Many bars for one person to have gone to would likely be less than 1 percent of all bars in said state, unless of course due is a legendary level alcoholic.

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    3. 6:47 ok, like you been where I've been hahaha

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  7. Are tire repair shops tied to drug trafficking? Like are they the places that stuff the wheels with dope, that we see so often?

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    Replies
    1. They are used as cover for illicit activity. The sad part is, the owners have no choice in the matter. Blue meth o plato

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    2. That is an interesting question. I wouldnt be surprised. not in GTO tho, prob in TJ, Cd Juarez

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    3. Ah yes, thanks guys. Fast cash = clean cash …

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    4. Have friends in Juarez that owns desponchadoras/tire shops, and non of them are involved, nor are forced to anything.

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    5. @2:46 you mean blue meth or plomo.

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    6. Yes. The link to stolen fuel allows them to use them as bases for the sale and storage of both. In that sense they are the perfect cover in Guanajuato.

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  8. the infamous CSRL drive-by shooting filmed on the GoPro head camera was them shooting up a CJNG linked tire shop

    ReplyDelete
  9. Whats up with the llanteras the tire shops in Phoenix, Arizona running 24/7? Anybody care to comment or elaborate on that?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hey guys you wanna know something cool! Tire shops in central Mexico are vulcanizadoras! Northern México and Southwest USA llanteras! Cuidad Juárez Chihuahua desponchadoras! And in the Dominican Republic gomeras cuz in the DR they’re called gomas and the proper name in Spanish are pneumaticas! Anybody care to comment or elaborate in what they’re called in other Spanish speaking countries or regions!

    ReplyDelete

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