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Saturday, November 19, 2022

Mexican Cartel Cooks Dispute DEA Claims of Rainbow Fentanyl to Appeal to Children

"Socalj" for Borderland Beat

The cook with the Sinaloa Cartel said that by adding food coloring to pure fentanyl, it would be impossible for dealers in the US to mix it with something else without the final drug user noticing.

The US Drug Enforcement Administration and police departments across the country have been warning about a new cartel strategy to sell fentanyl: pushing "rainbow-colored" fentanyl pills to hook children and young adults. But operatives in the Sinaloa Cartel, the Mexican criminal organization behind the biggest shipments of fentanyl to the US, told Insider their intention is actually the opposite.

US authorities began their campaign several months before Halloween, warning of alleged attempts by Mexican drug cartels to entice kids into drugs by selling rainbow-colored fentanyl pills and adding fentanyl to Halloween candies. In a statement published on August 30, DEA administrator Anne Milgram warned the public of "an alarming emerging trend of colorful fentanyl available across the United States."

"Rainbow fentanyl — fentanyl pills and powder that come in a variety of bright colors, shapes, and sizes — is a deliberate effort by drug traffickers to drive addiction amongst kids and young adults," Milgram said.

News stories and broadcasts began showing photos and videos of rainbow-colored pills and powder from seizures across the country. The reports described large quantities of colorful pills and cautioned parents to be on the lookout for them or things like them in their children's candy.


A cartel operative and a cook involved in the manufacture and shipment of fentanyl from Mexico told Insider that their intention was "actually the opposite" of what Milgram described. The coloring "is to make it look different than coke or white heroin," the fentanyl cook, speaking on the condition of anonymity, told Insider.

In 2021 alone, more than 100,000 people in the US died from fentanyl overdoses. Most were accidental deaths after using a substance like cocaine, heroin, or fake Percocet pills that had been laced with the powerful opioid.

"We know that some of the dealers in the US started mixing cocaine with 'fenta' without letting their buyers know, and that is very dangerous," the operative said. "Also we mix some of the heroin with fentanyl to make it more powerful, but we mark it, to let the buyer know that this one has 'fenta,'" he added. "Whatever happens when it's taken from our hands, it's not our problem. We get all the blame for the deaths, but we send a clean product, pure quality 'fenta,' or if its blow, just blow," he said. "If we are adding 'fenta' to the heroin, we are very clear that our batch has 'fenta' in it."

Despite the scare, a Washington Post review of news reports from mid-August to late October found only one case of accidental ingestion of "rainbow fentanyl" by a 2-year-old.

On November 17, however, the US Treasury Department announced sanctions against members of La Nueva Familia Michoacana, another Mexican criminal group, and accused it of marketing 'rainbow fentanyl' in "a deliberate effort to drive addiction amongst kids and young adults."

The Sinaloa Cartel operative denied that his organization is targeting kids or young adults in the US as their final users. "Why would we want to make kids addicts? What good would that do to us?" the cook said. "We want to sell what the people are asking for in the US, but not to kids or people who do not want to take drugs."

Right Recipe

Organizations like the Sinaloa Cartel and Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generación have been manufacturing fentanyl in the form of fake blue Percocet pills or adding it to heroin batches for at least four years. Fentanyl is cheaper to make because it is a synthetic opioid and doesn't require the time and expense of cultivating opium poppies to produce heroin or coca to make cocaine. Revenue from selling the opioid could be up to five times that of cocaine or heroin.

The drug is also easier to hide and transport because its potency means smaller quantities can still produce a strong high, though US authorities have reported seizing multi-hundred pound loads of the drug in recent months.


A leaked 2019 DEA report called the cartel "a prominent producer and trafficker of Mexico-based fentanyl into the United States," according to the investigative journalism project Forbidden Stories. A Sinaloa Cartel operative previously interviewed by Insider said that users in the US started asking for fentanyl-boosted heroin in 2015, but they didn't receive the order and recipes to cook it until 2019.

"The cook learned from a Chinese man, brought all the way here by the cartel," the cartel member said. "He is the only one who knows the recipe." "But many started dying because we still didn't have the right recipe, and some of them were not aware of the potency of the new product," he added.

Most of the chemicals used are illegally imported from China and Germany, according to the cook. As soon as the fentanyl powder reaches Mexico, they begin to cook in order to ship it to the US. "We cook from 10 to 20 kilos" — 22 to 44 pounds — "of heroin a day, and we work most of the week," the cook said. The cartels' increasing focus on producing fentanyl has been reflected in seizure data. In San Diego County alone, the amount of fentanyl intercepted by US Customs and Border Protection rose from 1,599 pounds in 2019 to more than 6,700 pounds in 2021.

Source Insider






27 comments:

  1. Los michoacanos son y siempre seran Los reyes de la droga synthetica despues de la Muerte de don nacho coronel

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    1. Quien cres que le enseño?? It wasnt the chinolas thats a fact aunque les pique

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    2. 2:29 aunque les pique a los michoacanos, los chinolas siempre seran los reyes del narco traffico

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    3. ANd your proud of that !!! Pinche scum of the earth, wait till one of your kids or relatives get addicted to this shit , then you can e proud of your scum!!!

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    4. "reyes del narco traffico". También los soplones pone dedos👑🐀🧀. En 15 palabras demostraste tu escuela truncada jajaja

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    5. Nothing to be proud of… Even from a drug trafficker’s perspective, “synthetics” are only pushed by scum. And I still don’t understand why these “synthetics” don’t ever include normal amphetamine. Or oxycodone… It’s not merely the fact that they’re manufacturing and trafficking ‘synthetics’, the problem is the fact that they’re trafficking the WORST kinds of synthetics.. Do they not realize how much more money they would make if they just manufactured and sold normal oxycodone or amphetamine and shit like that? By not doing that they are severely limiting the amount of people that can be considered customers. Only a very small demographic of people actually want meth or fentanyl and even most of the people settling for them are doing just that; settling.

      Meth: Pure horseshit compared to other amphetamines

      Fentanyl: Pure horseshit compared to other opioids

      Need I say more? Cartels clearly don’t understand the realistic demands of average Americans. Never met a single levelheaded person who wanted meth or fentanyl. But at least a third of the people I know definitely want Adderall or Percocet. These cartels are fucking stupid and clearly aren’t thinking in the long term.

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  2. This is true, I'm sure that very few actually care if children buy the pills, but suggesting that its intentional to give to children is overreach morality by the DEA, and it's true that the coloring is to distinguish and alos marketing and branding of quality.

    Whats more likely is that the guys down in Sinaloa in Jalisco don't want the heat from children dying or overdose deaths, that shape the narrative of intentionally killing people, rather than just the collateral damage from addiction and tons of drugs being shipped to the US

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    1. Dr. J for Dr. Jalisco
      The heat is on them already.
      Melanie Ramos and many other teenagers have died to fentanyl laced drugs.
      The tally of overdose deaths reached 107,000 in USA.
      It's a matter of time, before more get arrested.

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    2. DEA wants more funds. That’s why they sometimes cry and make shit up. In fact, they made up the word “Cartel” along with a bunch of other shit.

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    3. Dumb ass dea didn’t make up the word cartel. It’s actually a Latin word.

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    4. It’s not marked for kids per say but most drug users start when they are young teenagers or early adulthood

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    5. 100k people died from fent last year and media looses it mind. But when 100k people die from alcohol or 250k people die from tobacco the media doesn’t give a shit about those deaths. I’ve always found this odd the double standard

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    6. 1:24pm You are correct. Calling them cartels anymore is not accurate. They're just drug gangs. A cartel would be if they all sat down, divided up territory and hashed out prices and worked together. Cartel is just a word that scares uninformed Americans

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    7. 4:19; I don’t know if DEA is who applied “cartel” to drug gangs, but I believe the Columbians were using carteles to reference drug capos since the late 1970s and early 1980s

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    8. 9:36 Colombians*

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    9. Back when the Colombians where the dominant traffickers they had the territory divvied up and everything was all business…….back in the 70s early 80s MAYBE. But it’s been pure chaos since then.

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    10. 10:35 True but the connotations are fairly accurate. When Americans hear “Mexican cartel” they typically think of brutal, post-2006, Los Zetas-type torture methods and beheadings and that real sicc shit. On the flipside of that though, it’s sort of also a problem when Americans think that every Mexican or drug cartel is exactly like Los Zetas.

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  3. a floyd le encantaba el Fentanyl y la Meth.

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    1. I know you’re being at least partially facetious but realistically I doubt it. He was probably just another meth user who ended up having some amount of fentanyl cut into his batch.

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  4. dea and and the war on drugs is a big JOKE

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    1. @Fat Yo, what about the Alphabet Boyz flooding the streets with chemical weapons of mass destruction aka fentanyl via snitch CI junky informants to prop their department up, get raises and promotions, and skim off the top of drug seizure for personal benefits.

      I mean local law enforcement is guilty too

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  5. Blame mexico like always 🤔🤔🤔 the u.s starts the problem then throw the blame on someone else like always 🤔😤 wt a joke this strategy 8s old !!!!😂🤣😁🗣️u s is the worst of the worst !!!! U would be surprise on how dirty they are !!!!!🤔😤😁🗣️🤣

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    1. Emoji nino welcome back, on you next comment, put in 25 emojis.

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  6. Dea are a bunch of fear mongering idiots. They is little difference between the dea, cia and the people they are trying to catch

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    1. And considering how the DEA incarcerates people, they’re technically human traffickers just ‘legal’ human traffickers.

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  7. Listen yall I'm a fentynal user from Fresno CA and we all know that the multi colored stuff fuckin sucks the white fentynal is always the best... Thats a fact

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  8. Let's end this bad joke, let's stop looking for false narratives to demonize the demons. Let's grow some balls and do what we do best. I dont fucking care if this is for marking of ownership or quality. This is killing our people so let's release the dogs of war and return the favor. Kill them all and let God sort them out

    ReplyDelete

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