Blog dedicated to reporting on Mexican drug cartels
on the border line between the US and Mexico
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Sunday, July 3, 2022

Streets Of Philadelphia, Kensington Ave Documentary

"Sol Prendido" for Borderland Beat


Documentary by SBC News covering Streets of Philadelphia, Kensington Ave.

Philadelphia's most dangerous street.

Problems with Drugs and Crime in Kensington Ave, Philadelphia

In Philadelphia as a whole, violent crime and drug abuse are major issues. The city has a higher rate of violent crime than the national average and other similarly sized metropolitan areas. The drug overdose rate in Philadelphia is also concerning. 

Between 2013 and 2015, the number of drug overdose deaths in the city increased by 50%, with more than twice as many deaths from overdoses as homicides. 2 Kensington's high crime rate and drug abuse contribute significantly to Philadelphia's problems.

Because of the high number of drugs in the neighborhood, Kensington has the third-highest drug crime rate by neighborhood in Philadelphia, at 3.57. The opioid epidemic has played a significant role in this problem, as it has in much of the rest of the country. 

Opioid abuse has skyrocketed in the United States over the last two decades, and Philadelphia is no exception. In addition to having a high rate of drug overdose deaths, 80% of Philadelphia's overdose deaths involved opioids, and Kensington is a significant contributor to this figure. 

This Philadelphia neighborhood is said to have the largest open-air heroin market on the East Coast, with many neighbors migrating to the area for heroin and other opioids. With such a high concentration of drugs in Kensington, many state and local officials have focused on the neighborhood in an attempt to address Philadelphia's problem.

SBC News

25 comments:

  1. Being cutoff of pain pills suddenly by doctor is a major cause of addiction, they should be tapered gradually. These doctors just don't care, and they blame it on too much government paperwork to continue to prescribe.

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  2. Stupid lazy americans who just wanted to party and then they are addicted and on skid row!

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  3. Excellent metaphor for the rapid decline of the pax-american empire! Once the US$ reserve currency is gone its value will approach parity with the Mexican peso which will lead to hyper-inflation and the total collapse of the economy!

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    Replies
    1. Hi lil nuts

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    2. If dollar goes down , peso goes deeper silly

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  4. The people who think these kinds of scenes are mitigated by prohibition are just laughable.

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  5. Thank you Sol! I watched the video . Am passing it on to friends. It's excellent.

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    1. You're welcome. Let them know I said stay away from drugs. There's really no reason why anyone should find themselves lost like this, overtaken by what they initially believed was a recreational thing to do.

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    2. Yep. The narrator brought it home , that every person has a story. Might try watching it BB people!

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  6. Fentanyl drug addiction has already spread far and wide in the USA (Phoenix, San Fran, LA, Denver, etc). Fent creates zombies who "have to" do the drug as a vital imparative....logic and potential death means nada !
    This powerful drug is certain to spread "worldwide" ...as I predict, Mexico will soon find out (if it hasn't already).
    Mexico has a huge population of potential addict and the narco-"pushers" (narco-cartels) have absolutely no scruples about addicting their compatriots. No scruples, I say? Yep, I stand by my prediction based on the years of monitoring Borderland Beat (plus lesser web sites) and noting the almost routine heinous atrocities Mexican sicarios do to their own people.
    Again, in time Mexico and the entire world will have to deal with the fentanyl drug....
    P.S. If you are a parent with kids.... be afraid, very afraid!
    Mexico-Watcher

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    Replies
    1. Fentanyl is a new thing about a year in. Not many years.

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    2. Fentanyl has been around and been the thing for a few years already. I just think your late to the party.

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  7. I live here and this is really zombieland

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    1. You live with the 24 hour Zombie?

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    2. Now we know where SIR came from

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    3. Is zombie land in Mexico?
      Is there zombie land in USA?
      Or is it an Island called Zombie land?

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    4. @1:54 “Or is it an Island called Zombie land?”

      Well the word zombie does come from the island of Haiti. It originated from a datura ritual.

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  8. Ther is a new drug xyladine which is the one that makes them sleep while standing and bend over. Used by veterinarians on sheep, cows, and horses.

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    Replies
    1. Sleep/nodding while standing? People been doing that for decades, David Cross even had a bit about it. That’s just from opioids in general, including classic heroin.

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  9. Those blue pills ain't no joke

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  10. Does anyone know which narco-cartels are involved in:
    1. "Where" does fentanyl originate? (I hear it is China... is this true?)
    2. Is fentanyl processed for sale in Mexico or?
    3. How does fentanyl enter the USA?
    4. How and who is involved in getting fentanyl to addicts?
    5. Who else besides Mexicans are involved in fentanyl smuggling, distribution, marketing?
    Anything else about this drug, you might know is appreciated.
    Mexico-Watcher

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    Replies
    1. 1. Stereotypically, a lot of the precursors come from China yes but now in Mexico a lot of the precursors are actually just made right there.
      2. Probably to some extent but nothing compared to the U.S. and Canada. Mexico has more of a meth problem than anything else I think. The U.S. and Canada have a fentanyl epidemic, Mexico has a meth epidemic and the U.K. (especially Scotland/Glasgow) has a cocaine epidemic. Oh ya and I think Russia has a fairly big heroin problem.
      3. Mules, robots (people who don’t know what they’re even trafficking), and just threw cars in ports-of-entry. Tunnels as well. Probably less often by plane or ship compared to cocaine though. Coke trafficking always gets special treatment.
      4. Cartels and street suppliers in big cities in America are more intimately involved than most think. It only goes through about 2 or 3, maybe 4 people after leaving the hands of a cartel member. Most people who are connects for various low level retail dealers are cartel connected.
      5. I don’t know

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    2. Thanks a million for your efforts and thoughtful response.
      To me, fentanyl (and all analogs related to it and yet to come) represents an existential threat to America.... Metaphorically, like people changing radioactivity in our midst... The scenarios of how young people get introduced to the drug must be varied and sociologically fascinating. I have many questions concerning the addicts' career stages from start to the morgue.
      Again, thanks for your studied response!
      Mexico-Watcher

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