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Wednesday, August 11, 2021

“Here There Are No Self-Defense Groups!", Coincides The Father of Aguililla, Michoacán With The CJNG

"Sol Prendido" for Borderland Beat

Aguililla parish priest voiced how he felt about the recent circulated video of the CJNG where it was said that self-defense calls are also criminal groups

There are no self-defense groups here," agreed Father Gilberto Vergara de Aguililla, Michoacán, with the recent video of the Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG) where it was assured that these groups are also part of the cartels.

After the CJNG shared in a video that journalists and the media defend the self-defense organizations in Michoacán, the parish priest of Aguililla said that the real annoyance of the criminal group is because of the differentiated treatment between the two sides.

"What seems to make them angry is that in the media (CJNG) they are treated like a cartel (which they are) and the others pretend to be self-defense groups (as if we did not all know that this letterhead is so prostituted that it’s almost worse)," he shared on WhatsApp.

In the video that circulated, "signed" by the leader of the CJNG, Rubén Oseguera Cervantes, Juan Farías Álvarez, alias "El Abuelo Farías", and Hipólito Mora were accused of not being self-defense groups, but extortionists and criminals.

"They are drug traffickers who hide behind self-defense shirts. 

I don't think the government doesn't realize that they are not self-defense groups because of the type of weapons they bring and because they send me to make Narco Monster Vehicles that come out to around 100,000 pesos, prices that are incompetent for any self-defense groups," was heard in the recording.

For his part, Father Gil shared that this message is also addressed to the authorities, because by differentiating the two organizations, they facilitate the work of the self-defense groups when they are part of it, and that the correct thing would be to call everything by its name; CJNG and United Cartels

"I think that the widespread complaint (and not only to the press, but also to the government) is that they are going to charge against them making it easier for others to exist. I think the simple solution is to call everyone by their name: CJNG and United Cartels. It had to be said and it was said," he concluded.

Regarding the video of the CJNG and its threat against members of the press, Jesús Ramírez Cuevas, General Coordinator of Social Communication and Spokesperson of the Government of the Republic, reported that the authorities will take measures to protect journalists and media for the coverage they make in that area of Michoacán.

Debate

10 comments:

  1. 100k greenbacks or 100k pesos? Mostruo.

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    Replies
    1. If he is talking about how much they are worth than it is in US dollars, as a lot of those vehicles start out as super duty trucks or utility trucks. If it’s what he gets paid to work on him likely pesos

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    2. You are correct. Super duty trucks. Must be $$

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    3. Reduce the cost if the truck is stolen.

      Delete
  2. Regardless of how you feel about the Catholic church or religion as a whole, the priests in Michoacán have really been advocating for the people of their community.

    Right after the pope's envoy visited, priests were using social media to bring attention to the forest fires on the hills caused by cartel fights. They used the recent media buzz they got to call out that the government had not done anything about the fires. They also went on radio shows and gave interviews about how the civilians were suffering from the cartel roadblocks. I think its really great to see these priests who clearly deeply care about the people of their communities.

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  3. Is this old man trying to get himself killed or what?����

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  4. 100% actually the priests and nuns, in these municipalities lay their life on the line for people. At this point the only thing helping the people in Aguilla is the church, out of kindness with no reward, just threats. I should mention I'm an atheist and I still applaud the work of truly good people regardless of their creed. Good is good, kind is kind even while the monster breaths at the back of your neck

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  5. This Priest has guts. Siga haci padre. Gracias por su lucha. Que DIOS lo bendiga. Saludos y un abrazo desde Los Angeles Sol. Que estén bien. Su amigo El Nemesis-

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  6. Marcial Maciel was also a padrecito given to us from michuakàn, his Legionaries de Cristo keep up the corruption.

    ReplyDelete

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