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Thursday, May 27, 2021

California Drug Ring Linked to Ohio Officer's Killing and the Sinaloa Cartel

"Parro" for Borderland Beat

Dayton, Ohio, police officers honor Jorge Del Rio. Investigators say his case is linked to the Sinaloa Cartel

As a detective descended the stairs inside a Dayton, Ohio, house to serve a search warrant, one of the suspects pointed a gun and fired.

Jorge Del Rio, a 55-year-old Mexican native and Indiana University graduate who dedicated three decades of his life to the Dayton Police Department, collapsed in front of his fellow drug officers.

The husband, father of five and grandfather, who once thwarted a double murder plot, died three days later. Because he had decided to be an organ donor — itself an act of public service — his kidney saved a woman's life.

Del Rio spent nearly 20 years as a task force officer with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and was shot while targeting traffickers peddling cocaine and fentanyl. The Ohio drug ring is connected to a large cross-country drug network based on the West Coast and supplied by the infamous Sinaloa Cartel, Jarod Forget, special agent in charge of the DEA's Washington, D.C. Division, told the Courier Journal.

"We were able to fully identify the drug-trafficking organization from California to the Ohio one — the same people responsible for killing the TFO (Del Rio) — and take that whole thing out," Forget said. Forget briefed reporters Wednesday in Washington, D.C., about the multi-million-dollar network that saturated American neighborhoods with as much as 99 metric tons of drugs since 2017.

During the investigation, agents intercepted as many as 21 million potentially lethal doses of fentanyl, the top illicit drug killing Americans during the deadliest drug crisis in the nation's history.

Police detective Jorge Del Rio died on 4 November 2019

Cartel connection
Sinaloa Cartel members across the border in Mexicali, Baja California and throughout the state of Sinaloa on Mexico's West Coast sent millions of dollars of drugs into the U.S. to supply the large network, court records show.

Mainly, they preferred stashing the drugs in the middle of legitimate shipments on semis, or hidden in cars and trucks and driven through a legal point-of-entry at the border of Tijuana and San Diego, according to investigators.

Cartel members are accused of bribing corrupt government and military officials in Tijuana to get their product safely to America. If there was a concern, the cartel pivoted and used the entry point at the border of San Luis, Arizona.

Once inside the U.S., drugs were sent to the Los Angeles area. Some were sold to area traffickers to target local users. Los Angeles also served as a hub to gather and store large shipments eventually headed to Ohio; Virginia; Maryland; Washington, D.C.; Connecticut; and beyond.

More than 30 defendants have been charged during the four-year investigation. Police and agents seized more than 110 guns, including sawed-off shotguns, rifles and handguns and bullets that can penetrate body armor.

Investigators intercepted 42 kilograms of fentanyl with a street value of about $5.2 million. They also found nearly $12 million worth of cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine.

In 2017, DEA agents discovered a mid-level ring trafficking cocaine, fentanyl, meth and pills in the greater D.C. area. That led to the December arrest of Andre E. Hamilton. During a search of his home in Silver Spring, Maryland, investigators said they found 1.5 kilograms of cocaine and $65,000 in cash.

The day after Christmas, agents seized from Hamilton's home a men’s Audemars Piguet stainless steel and diamond wristwatch valued at $65,450, a $20,000 custom Zodiac Diamond Zodiac pendant and a lady's Cartier gold and stainless steel diamond watch worth nearly $30,000.

Hamilton, who faces a federal charge of conspiracy to distribute 50 or more grams of cocaine, maintains his innocence. Last week, prosecutors filed a motion asking for the authority to keep the items, along with a $42,500 2016 Mercedes-Benz SUV from a D.C. parking lot, if Hamilton is convicted at trial.

The investigation into Hamilton and the cell, operating mainly in D.C. and Virginia, spawned other investigations throughout the country. It also helped expose drug networks in California, Ohio and Connecticut.

"We identified a cell, took it down, and were able to leapfrog to the group that supplied that cell," Forget said.

Drugs and weapons seized at one of the crime scenes

Why Ohio detective was shot
In Dayton, members of a different DEA task force were listening to a call when Nathan S. Goddard Jr. offered to sell a customer a “whole one” of “fetty” for "60," slang for a kilogram of fentanyl for $60,000.

A judge signed a search warrant and Del Rio and other task force members headed to the Ruskin Road house at 6:50 p.m. on Nov. 4, 2019 to serve a search warrant.

According to a DEA agent, task force members knocked on the door and announced they were police. When no one answered, they searched the house. Del Rio headed down the basement stairs, where Goddard and three others were gathered.

Police say Goddard opened fire, deliberately shooting Del Rio. When officers got to the basement, they spotted a pistol on the floor. It had laser sights and an extended magazine and was loaded with bullets capable of piercing police body armor. Another suspect had the same type of gun holstered on his hip. Investigators also found an assault rifle in a storage area underneath the basement staircase.

Elsewhere in the basement, police found a money counter and drug press, plastic bags with as much as 60 pounds of marijuana stacked on the floor next to a television, about $11,000 in cash spread out on a coffee table and an estimated $40,000 shoved in a duffel bag.

Goddard, then 39, told police the drugs were his and he fired two or three shots at the man on the stairs because he thought he was being robbed, an agent stated in the criminal complaint.

Prosecutors have sent information on the case to Department of Justice officials for review. Attorney General Merrick Garland will decide whether federal prosecutors in Ohio seek a death sentence if Goddard is convicted of killing Del Rio. A decision is expected by October, according to court filings.

When Goddard and others were arrested in the Ruskin Road basement, investigators found at least 400 grams of fentanyl — enough for 200,000 doses — some marijuana and at least 500 grams of cocaine, an Ohio DEA agent stated in the federal complaint against Goddard. Eventually, investigators linked the Ohio cell to the L.A. supply chain and went after suspect Mark Anderson, a Southern California native.

Anderson is accused of leading the U.S. side of the expansive drug network, directing the shipment of drugs by tractor-trailers from California to Ohio, the Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia region and other locations, prosecutors said in court documents. Agents arrested Anderson at a Los Angeles restaurant in January.

He maintains his innocence, and his attorney argued that Anderson had no history of violence, tended to his mother, cared for his children during the daytime and successfully bred dogs, according to court documents filed by the defense.

Agents blame Anderson for ordering Fredrick Sutherland, the independent driver of a white tractor-trailer, to deliver the drugs to the Dayton home where the task force officer was shot and killed. Prosecutors wanted him in Ohio. Agents flew Anderson from California to Lexington, Kentucky, on March 26 and headed north to the Butler County Jail in Ohio.

Sutherland, based in Los Angeles, later admitted he worked for Anderson and hauled drugs to several states across the country and to the East Coast. This included delivering 20 kilos of fentanyl to New York.

Sutherland acknowledged in court records to helping traffic 99 metric tons of drugs to D.C., Ohio, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York and Connecticut. He pleaded guilty in March to drug trafficking and faces 10 years to life.

Investigators also went after the duo blamed for arming Goddard and his Dayton crew with illegal guns.

Arland Mills, 42, pleaded guilty in November to paying a 50-year-old Trenton, Ohio, man to illegally buy several firearms for him, including the gun used to shoot the Dayton detective, according to the website for the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio.

Mills must forfeit 28 firearms and faces up to 10 years in prison.

One of the luxury items found at the home of one of the suspects

Inside a D.C. 'stash' house
Agents zeroed in on two men they considered to be major players blamed for an influx of drugs to the D.C. metropolitan area.

The first one, Maryland resident Roger Vincent, 42, pleaded guilty in 2019 to trafficking cocaine and heroin. He had a "stash house" in D.C., where DEA agents found cocaine, heroin and a handgun modified to function fully automatic, allowing a rapid burst of fire.

Investigators arrested the other man they labeled as a major area supplier, Romaine Anthony Dixon, in Virginia in February 2020. Inside his car, police found 25 kilos of cocaine and more than $11,000 in cash.

At Dixon’s residence in Camp Springs, Maryland, law enforcement found more than $1 million in cash, jewelry valued at more than $244,000, a kilo of cocaine, a kilogram of fentanyl, three firearms and body armor-piercing ammunition.

Five months after his arrest, Dixon, 32, pleaded guilty to trafficking 5 kilograms or more of cocaine from May 2019 through February 2020.

Dixon typically traveled to California every three to four weeks to buy $500,000 worth of cocaine from Mexican cartel associates. He and his co-conspirators would then ship the drugs in large crates to the greater D.C. area.

In January, a federal judge in Alexandria sentenced Dixon to serve 11 years and eight months in prison. The investigation led to the largest ever seizure in Loudoun County, Virginia, netting more than $6.5 million in drugs, guns and cash, according to Forget and the Loudoun County Sheriff's Office, which helped investigate the case.

The seizure included 50 kilos of cocaine, one kilo of heroin, two kilos of fentanyl and 100 fentanyl pills — which are made to resemble prescription pain pills but are much more lethal.

Despite all of the arrests, the case still isn't over. Agents are now searching for a suspect in Mexico and continuing investigations into other people.

72 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Most of those “bust-downs” are stolen anyways. They just drill the hell out of it to fix all those diamonds (which often coincidentally drills out the serial number).

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    2. @ 1023 Don't kid yourself pictures don't do it justice. That watch is beautiful in person

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  2. Wow MX informative article, unfortunately a good Detective God killed. They did yell police, and the lame fools excuse, I thought we were being robbed. The good thing in USA, all suspects get arrested vs. Mexico they are let free after bribing officials.

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    1. 10:54 Joseph Weichelbaum got a milliond dollar job after getting released of his 17 day suspended sentence for three convictions on different states, others never went to trial, they were called the iran/contra drug traffickers, because, well, the US is sooo different.. .

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  3. A drug war veteran with almost 20 years of service. Why would anyone even bother capturing that drug pusher alive? Seems like the DEA is having to fight with one hand tied behind their backs. Yeah and that watch looks like crap.

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    1. Well they were able to interview him, and he rattled out, on the shadow workers, more got arrested. Sinaloa Cartel lost some big loads.

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    2. Typical Three letter fed approach, the best feds out there usually hail as patrol cops.

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    3. Confiscations that grant finders keepers agreements fuels the cops eagerness, Serpico never got rewarded, just desserts from his own brothers at arms, but the movie failed to assert that there are corrupt traitors in the middle of everywhere.
      Let's not deificate anybody.

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  4. That's a sick watch!

    You guys probably still use those old school watch/calculator combos

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    Replies
    1. sure sounds like it! lmao

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    2. Never under estimate the mystique of a man who wears a CASIO calculator on his wrist. Pick up artist 101 right there. Your welcome.

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  5. Selling that poison to your fellow citizens for a couple bucks.. smh

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    1. To be fair no one is forcing them to use the drugs and these guys weren't some corner boys. Clearly it was for more than 'a couple of bucks.'

      Regardless, even though they were making a ton of money, you see the end result, a long prison sentence.

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    2. My boy, open your shallow head and understand that a 65k watch and a nice car and 75k in cash sounds like a lot to me and you but to risk your life and risk of killing other people in the process that is a couple bucks. I know KIDS who stacked that selling nothing but weed

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  6. Italian mafia hit 💯%

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  7. Alguien sabe si Eddie Escobedo alias El Mago alias El Eddie sigue activo o qué rollo. From East Los Angeles I bilieve many corridos written about him look him up and several news articles mention his name for the Torrance California mota bust and the hit on the 101 for one of his former business partners in the Bentley that caught the attention of media and police

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    Replies
    1. Last time hes name was mentioned he got chase out of durango ( sapo) was what they call him , but, who knows

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    2. Ese fulano esta preso. He got caught up in the Narco Polo op. Should be out soon. El bueno en LA es el TI. Es El que recibe de la Gente de sierra Lima charlie.

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    3. Beni hibachi trucks

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  8. This was called Operation Angels Envy.
    https://www.dea.gov/press-releases/2021/05/26/dea-washington-division-announces-major-results-operation-angels-envy

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  9. Etch a sketch homieMay 27, 2021 at 1:18 PM

    Ohio is full of meth heads

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    Replies
    1. The nation is. No city is exempt from drug addiction.
      Hate to burst that bubble.

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    2. No shet shirlock tell me one State in USA, that is not affected with drugs.....now don't keep me waiting.

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    3. I'm from ohio and I know 1 methhead.

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    4. 9:56 check in the closet.

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  10. SINALOENSES ARE THE NEW ZETAS😀😀😀

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    Replies
    1. @1:56 They the real narcos, nice try tho.

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    2. You misspelled cjng

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    3. lol cjngs biggest groupie strikes again 🤣🤣🤣

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    4. @359 they the real snitches.

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    5. El (Mayo Zambada) is the real (Master Zplinter) thats why the both start wit a M and a Z cds ae the biggest rats, asta en ratas ahi classes y los sinaloas son unas (sumatran bamboo rats) cant get bigger than that 🤣🤣🤣

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    6. I ment 5:28 for 1:56. But that's funny both ways

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    7. @6:25 MZ is not the full of CDS, bring better arguments on your hatred.

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    8. 10:19 no hatred just facts

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    9. El Mayate gots Big Boss Batton, but when your allies lose their political powers, their competition wants their riteful share of profits from the paspurria, losing Maricopa has consequences, not just for Arpaio but for every associate of the Iran/Contra franchise owners and associate pawns.

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  11. And the Democrats put down police.

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  12. Lmao. Only show off as much as you can prove, the peasant mentality is to buy jewelry, cars, etc and put yourself on the map. This is what amateur hour looks like. Then you’re gonna put everything in your main place of residence??

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  13. Now the usa will be blaming caro quintero and every guy with a Mexican last name!!!!

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  14. That watch is clean you foos are hating! APs are better than Rolex and Cartier but not better than RM

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    Replies
    1. Typical for people to say who cant afford to pay $65k in cash for a watch. And that pic doesnt due it justice. I googled its and its really clean watch. . Worth more thn any car they have financed thru a bank and saying its ugly. Okay....

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    2. typical wannabe ballers..that watch is ugly af lmao

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    3. It’s cuz some of the followers here are gringo aficionados, so anything that’s been “hip hopped” they’re against and will “hate” on. Just like their masters taught them to.

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    4. The watch does look cheap.

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    5. The two dollar look of success still attracks the two dollah crack hoes of the future...
      Wearing a bag of maruchan on your wrist would not work.

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  15. Fuck snitchloas! They need to be anihilated! Always killing innocents!
    They are scared of cjng cause cjng does have guns! Cds is only brave against people without guns!

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    Replies
    1. CJNG are the low life scum, aka baby killer cartel, known to kill Innocents of all ages.

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    2. You got it wrong bro, it's cjng that is killing anyone and everyone, trying to take over all of Mexico like Hitler tried, but at the end he lost took a pill to kill himself, history will repeat itself, when Mencho takes the pill of death.

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    3. @3:52 lol this fangirl

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    4. Cjng taking losses all over Mexico. The baby killer cartel might be done?! Stay tuned

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    5. Jajajaja just wanted to see your cds fangirls reaction! I dont think cds is any better than cjng they both shit and you guys gave me a good laugh with all tour cheering🤣🤣🤣

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    6. 7:58 Hitler himself used Amphetamines with great success to turn his ass into a chickenhawk warrior, but his starved armies could not sustain the Turd Reich on speed forever.
      What makes you think speed and gonorrea will keep Las Menchas up there forever?
      Hitler did not kill himself, the Catholic Church and henry kissinger saved him like el Lazca y el Chayo and their nazi rat line escapees.

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  16. You know what wouldve stopped this from happening?? Ending the drug war and legalizing everything

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    1. 4:06 Not without taxing everything and everybody that made off with BILLIONS AND BILLIONS of dollars

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  17. You know what wouldve stopped this from happening?? Ending the drug war and legalizing everything

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  18. You know what wouldve stopped this from happening?? Ending the drug war and legalizing everything

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    1. Sligo you got a bad case of the burps/ hicups. Hummm your theory is hogwash. Ok let legalize extortion, kidnappings, land and home theft. Outlandish dreamer.

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    2. 10:22 putting the anti-kidnapping specialists trained in spain, france, the US, (including by the FBI) in a prison would help a lot, they are behind most of the kidnappings for ransom and extortions all over México, including luis cardenas palomino whose Godfather Capitan Jesus Miyazawa got fired from the Policia Judicial Federal for the same crimes before they became the rage on moneymaking by mexican cops.

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  19. this is why CJNG needs to get exterminated permanently the jalisco influence these kind of acts it's like they've place a no boundaries rule when the señores from Sinaloa established rules and jaliscos broke them and now everything and everyone is fair game anything the other organization do I blame jaliscos 100%!!!!

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    1. WTF? Did you Chinaloa connect supply you with pure cut and you've lost the little bit of gray matter that was in your numbskull? The snitching definitely demonstrates they were connected to CDSNITCHaloa, now them ABCs are after the source of supply

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  20. F. that M.F'ing cop killer and bury his azz under the prison.

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  21. And NOW that a cop in the US gets KILLED now it's serious right?..
    Meanwhile in 🇲🇽 they get KILLED by the dozens..
    You will say this ain't Mexico and they will get Justice. That's true..
    But the drugs will continue to flow and CARTELS will continue to operate BECAUSE war on drugs is a LIE..

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  22. Courier-Journal has some great articles on El Mencho/CNJG. They are a good source for understanding the basics. It was through reading those articles that introduced me to Borderland Beat. Thought I would pass that on to other 'novices'

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  23. Mosluggo,

    but but but but drugs are bad! mkay! and and and i know of a moron right?, who did drugs left, now to be straight sure he was a moron before the drugs, but taking a few steps back before we go all down hill, can we just like ya know blame the drugs instead of giving credence to this whole notion of holding the individual accountable for their own actions..?

    it really gives me anxiety thinking too hard, to combat this i obtain perscriptions thru a state certified medical practicer that charges me a fee for his permission communion and blessing that grants me access to the 2nd state certified inidividual, this is the gate keeper of the little helpers that i use to modify how i choose to feel, odds are high i go thru a corporate dispenser called the pharmcia to purchase my remedy of choice. safety is knowing the big corporates tend to have the large amounts of capital needed to play ball and the state has given its blessing it feels good doing as im told.. but what really makes me feel xtra safe is when fellow citizens of adult age decide to partake in something that i myself do as well.. otherwise the results can be unpredictable, bcuz when the state says no, then society can only be harmonious if us citizens to unconditionally comply and harshly ostrisize, ridicule, vilify, persecute, prosecute, torture, cage and execute all who doubt, question, challenge, ig ore, disobey, refute, or refuse the mandate of our caring government. remember we have to compete with china now days...

    what is so hard to understand? drugs can do harm but the solution is clearly obtuse erm obvious...to force adults to bend to the will of the state or else...compelled abstinance or just put them in a cage or something until their spirit is broken, will to live in questioned, faith in the system is shattered, trust in the empathy of fellow human beings is lost, or at the very least we ought to severely hamper their ability to get a legit job to build a standing in society thru binding their very being to bits of data declaring them a criminal offender/defacto 2nd class citizen for life

    actions of a few and instead ban the substances the state doesnt like especially the ones hardest to tax, those are the most dangerous ya know. thats a big part of what makes me know im right in telling others that they shouldnt do drugs either, and in case that doesnt convince other adults to stop using the list of banned substances, then the nedt logical step will be to condone a para military police institution to form a variety of task forces backed by numerous health and safety codes and laws to go after anyone who dare challenge the wrath of the state...

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    Replies
    1. Write a book
      And quit the meth dude.

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    2. This is freakin funny !

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    3. Don't blame the pushers or the addicts, much less the drugs, blame the government officers that impossed drug trafficking since they imported opium teas to China, and the world, they are the ones that bought US lawmakers to legalize prescriptions for profit through political donations from umscrupulous lobbyists with licenses to kill, even US Senator Orrin Hatch got bought and paid, he named his price, about $140 000.00 USD.

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  24. If hospitals find out you're an organ donor....they will do their best to harvest you, like this poor man after 3 days in the hospital........odd

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  25. This whole storie sounds fishi , poor del rio Probably hot set up by his own crew, what a shame

    ReplyDelete

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