Monday, September 7, 2020

Previously deported, Mexican national pleads guilty to drug charges and sentenced to 16+ years

Chivis Martinez Borderland Beat  TY Gus  DOJ

Kansas City, Mo; Luis Manuel Gonzalez-Rodriguez Sentenced to 16 Years for  Meth Conspiracy

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – A Mexican national who resided in Springfield, Missouri, was sentenced in federal court today for his role in a conspiracy to distribute large amounts of methamphetamine in the Kansas City, Missouri, area and in the Springfield area.

Luis Manuel Gonzalez-Rodriguez, 44, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Greg Kays to 16 years and eight months in federal prison without parole.

On Jan. 6, 2020, Gonzalez-Rodriguez pleaded guilty to participating in a conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug-trafficking crime, and illegally reentering the United States after having been deported.

Gonzalez-Rodriguez was arrested on Nov. 2, 2017, when law enforcement officers executed a search warrant at his residence. Gonzalez-Rodriguez attempted to flush approximately 157.1 grams of methamphetamine down the toilet as officers entered the residence. Officers searched the residence and found an additional 3.7 grams of pure methamphetamine, cocaine, a Walther .380-caliber semi-automatic pistol that had been reported stolen in Arkansas, ammunition, 14 cell phones, ledgers and drug notes, and $21,558. Gonzalez-Rodriguez admitted that he was illegally present in the United States. He was deported in October 2011 after previously having been convicted of illegally reentering the United States.

Gonzalez-Rodriguez’s plea agreement cites several controlled purchases of methamphetamine by cooperating law enforcement sources, as well as his involvement in several controlled purchases by a cooperating source from co-defendant Jason Edward Hochard, 41, of Kansas City, Kansas, during the investigation of the drug-trafficking organization.

Hochard was sentenced on July 30, 2020, to 14 years and eight months in federal prison without parole.

On Nov. 1, 2017, co-defendant Darely Dominguez-Bustillos, 26, of Kansas City, Kansas, delivered one pound of methamphetamine to Gonzalez-Rodriguez. Dominguez-Bustillos then transported $8,000 in illicit drug proceeds from Gonzalez-Rodriguez back to her residence. Law enforcement discovered this money when they later executed a search warrant at her residence and in the vehicles located at that residence.

Dominguez-Bustillos was sentenced on May 20, 2020, to four years in federal prison without parole.

Gonzalez-Rodriguez’s plea agreement also cites multiple deliveries of methamphetamine to co-defendant Tara Hageman, 45, of Springfield. When law enforcement officers executed a search warrant at Hageman’s residence, they seized 103 grams of pure methamphetamine and two handguns.

Hageman, who admitted she distributed the methamphetamine to others, was sentenced on March 11, 2020, to seven years in federal prison without parole.

Co-defendant Armando Quintana-Galaz, 38, a citizen of Mexico residing in Springfield, was sentenced on May 26, 2020, to 16 years and eight months in federal prison without parole. Quintana-Galaz had been deported from the United States six times before being arrested on Nov. 2, 2017, in Springfield. At that time, he was again illegally present in the United States. When law enforcement officers executed a search warrant at Quintana-Galaz’s residence on that day, they found approximately 3.159 kilograms of pure methamphetamine in a hamper in the master bathroom and approximately 189 grams of pure methamphetamine in a dresser in the master bedroom. They found a Ruger 9mm semi-automatic handgun, a Norinco SKS 762-caliber rifle, various ammunition, a bag that contained approximately four grams of cocaine, and six cell phones. They also found a Taurus 9mm semi-automatic handgun in his Jeep Grand Cherokee. Officers also found $40,020 in a dresser in the master bedroom, $6,295 in the pocket of his pants that were on a TV stand, and $293 in a suitcase in the master bathroom closet. According to his plea agreement, the $46,608 seized from Quintana-Galaz’s residence would convert to more than 2.6 kilograms (2,642.6 grams) of methamphetamine.

Co-defendant Miguel Angel Ramirez-Romero, 27, a citizen of Mexico residing in Kansas City, Kan., was sentenced on Nov. 13, 2019, to 14 years in federal prison without parole.

Gonzalez-Rodriguez is the final defendant in this case to be sentenced, among six defendants who have been convicted.

This case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Trey Alford. It was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

31 comments:

  1. Great job more traffickers going to prison.

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  2. Replies
    1. Remember the time Mr. T would call all people coming from Mexico..bad hombres, rapist. He labeled everyone that, yet a good percentage come to better thier lives and steer away from crime.

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    2. 1046
      ok dude,we believe you

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  3. What about his human rights ?

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    Replies
    1. human Rights a joke in Mexico, its control by the Cartel. Human Right complain about Mexican law enforcement. Never about Cartel Volience

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    2. What human rights, the mfker committed a crime/felony and now will spend time in the pokey. Then here you come with human rights 😂 I can't stop laughing.

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    3. 7:49 i can't see the funny side, what are you smoking?
      I see irony in the question about human rights,
      boy could a got himself an Alford Plea

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    4. 1226 what about all those people he poisioned with drugs? Addiction makes people do crimes to buy more drugs.

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    5. what role should his human rights play? I am sure they were respected during the trial. Human rights don't mean that you don't have to go to prison for doing something illegal.
      I'm pretty sure you knew that, so why the question?

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    6. I cant believe the amount of dumb fuckers on here.
      Human rights,might be a bit of sarcasm,kno what i mean?

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  4. Isnt it racist to deport him ? Hint of sarcasm ?

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    Replies
    1. 12:27 Tried that,
      didn't work,
      no more deport.

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  5. If he was killed by police in a shootout with the Walther he had,people would be crying about racism ?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I think 15+ years fits the crime. I doubt he will be living in paradise.

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    2. Nope mexicans too busy working .

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    3. Well now that's why we have minority cops that can shoot him and everything will be fine then. Right?

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    4. 3 separate comments in a row @12:26,12:27,12:31?

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    5. Not really Poncho, it's more on the other color. If people would listen to police commands, during a volitle situation and keep hands visible things would not get out of hand.

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    6. 12:31 we mexican not the same BLM and mark my words , ur a bad hombre.

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    7. 7:10 george did not obey and "got in the car" as ordered,
      Guess he had death coming for not obeying...

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    8. 7:34 remember you brought me. G into topic, it would have been a simple trip to the station, but no, he had to behave, with a tantrum look at the full body can video...he did not want to go to the station, once in the back seat, he acted up "I am casterphobic" ok window was open for him, "oh no I can't breathe" even before he was put on the ground. He was not cooperating, most don't and they bring onto themselves. He was giving the police a hard time, he never wanted to stay seated, why you think they laid him outside.
      Man people don't see the whole picture, and no I am not racist.

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    9. People with mental problems do what they do, they can't help it but police officers get paid plenty BIG BUCKS and get an education before getting sent to Serve and Protect "without malice towards anyone", even if they put you on your place on a previous assignment you both worked as private security guards...

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  6. Why not reward each state bureau of prisons with a hunk of seized money? Or build new prisons. Property forfeiture auction. Then dump the released prisoner with a 50 year threat if caught in the USA AGAIN.

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    Replies
    1. Seized money BELONGS to the investigating agencies who might split some with local police corporations like for new flashier bigger badges, everything else like prosecutions, hanging judges, prisons and incarceration and their human resources must be paid for by the US Government's Taxpayers, some of it comes from taxes on our bags of chips, sodas and toilet paper.

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  7. Great, we get to foot the bill of $60,000 year to incarcerate him, while myself, and millions of other hard working, taxpaying, citizens are barely holding on by a thread.

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    Replies
    1. 8:29 $60 000.00 US Dollars
      We should give cons 30 thousand a year to retire, but private prisons charge more to keep the crap up.

      Delete
  8. 16 years on tax payer's money. He should just he put to sleep or deported from wherever the hell he crawled in.

    ReplyDelete

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