Friday, July 10, 2020

Juarez goes high-tech to counter drug cartel violence

Chivis Borderland Beat  TY GUS  Fox2Now
A weapon to fight growing violence, last month ended with 170 killings.  Juarez is getting ready to debut new Intelligence Center and network of 1,078 'smart' surveillance cameras...

Drug cartels for years have used surveillance cameras to monitor the movement of Mexican police.

But now a border city is trying to turn the tables on criminals by installing high-definition cameras with facial recognition and license-plate reading capabilities in public places and the busiest streets.

The first 190 “smart” cameras are in test mode at undisclosed locations in Juarez. In the next year or so, a network of 1,078 additional devices will be up and running throughout the city, Chihuahua Gov. Javier Corral said.
The cameras will be monitored at the new 911 call and Intelligence Center, known as CERI. 

Police officers equipped with tablets will also access the feed upon request.

“This is an unprecedented project […] Juarez will become one of the most-watched cities” in Latin America, Corral said at a teleconference on Thursday.

The goal is to dissuade criminals from conducting their activities in public places if they know they’re being watched. Juarez recorded nearly 1,500 murders last year and attributed most of them to drug cartel violence. The killings continue unabated, with more than 170 murders reported last month.
                                                         live camera use this link

The cameras will be mounted atop utility poles. Some will be fixed, some will be able to rotate 360 degrees and some have special features such as the license-plate readers and facial recognition software.

The cameras also will spot stolen cars, which cartel hit squads use, then abandon, when they set off to kill rivals. And if a shooting takes place in the area under surveillance, police will be able to identify suspects and vehicles, Corral said.

“We want to strengthen crime prevention … and to improve investigations with images that can help us reconstruct these acts and see what routes the suspects used to flee,” he said.

The cameras and software cost the state and municipal government $11 million.


The governor said CERI officers will also be able to link to the cellphones of people who have video of a crime in progress or a crime they witnessed and recorded.

The center located at one of Juarez’s police substation will be staffed by municipal, state and federal officers.


37 comments:

  1. lol @ that picture of cop in car, that's not a tablet that's a Cisco voice over IP phone.

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    1. 8:50 not even! The offisa' is just looking at the box the device make uses to advertise it un COSCOS AND WALMARS AND SAMS CLUBS,
      THE eletronics bright by other estados has been old dated amd discarded devices OR NOTHING like Aguascalientes' CAT SCAN MOCHINES, bought by former governor femat and his son el Principeso...that is one last Femat Problem nobody ain't about to solve

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    2. 8:50 hahaha

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  2. Seems to me that criminals were given a heads up on how to counter attack.
    Modifications to conduct criminal activities will always remain a priority.


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  3. What on earth is the point if the police isn’t going to do anything about it

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    1. @9:12 ever hear of the WoD??? Its a political farce to keep the poor in check and make the rich richer.

      This is an example: some 'senor bien importante' (aka corrupt motthafucka) has decided to buy an expensive high-tech system from some 'amigo' of his (another corrupt motthafucka).

      There will be a bill for $10 millions for a system which normally costs $6million. Half of the stipulated system will be delivered.

      Half of the delivered system will never work and half of the working system will be vandalised within 24 hours.

      In the end there will be 3 cameras working which can be used for demo purposes when 'otro senor muy importante' pays visit cause he is looking for a way to funnel a few millions $ to 'otro muy amigo suyo'.

      All in the name of the money machine called the WoD.

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    2. @3:33, I always shake my head when someone mentions money being made with the WoD. If drugs were legalized then the amount of revenue created would dwarf the expenses now being spent. And if drugs are ever legalized I bet you will complain about how the big bad corporations are making all the money and keeping the poor man down.

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    3. @ 7:12
      Inequality will always bring resentments. Unless its ones pockets who is being enriched.

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    4. La pinche neta, the War on Drugs only benefits its senior mánagers and their little middle men and their mexican sicarios, all trying to take the drug trafficking business for themselves, same as always, all covered with a lot of promises and BS for icing on the shitcake

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  4. That sounds great, currupted officers will more likely sell the tablets to known cartels.

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  5. I’m sure there’s someone in there who’s looking for 10k a month jajajaja

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  6. they will shoot the cameras i bet

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  7. This won't last long

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  8. Cabada can't even fix the streets... Such horrible condition here in Juarez... I hope people will destroy them.

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  9. “The governor said CERI officers will also be able to link to the cellphones of people who have video of a crime in progress or a crime they witnessed and recorded.”
    Where does the access to data on phones end? Do they only have access to video of crimes? Are they using your photos to increase their databank of facial I.D.s for the facial recognition? I am for an end to the violence but they are amassing a lot of data on average people and the government has proven to be corrupt and not out for the best interests of the people. I hope the cameras decrease violence and they don’t just spy on regular citizens.

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  10. Regardless, there are so many CONS to this. The first being the police and intelligence will know exactly where the cameras are located. Second, the cartels IT people outsmart the government any day and will be easily hacked. Third, easy cash for a briibable officer(s). The cartel payroll just increases for an extra bit of stability heads up from law enforcement. Fourth, the data and cloud info can be easily deleted forever by the IT people. Fifth, but definitely not last Mexico’s justice is arrest, impunity, immunity and release then file a amparo after amparo to be vindicated and protected from further prosecution. Then just keep on raping, robbing, kidnapping, butchering, maiming, and brutally killing anyone they want. To include close friends, family and random innocents. The life of a worthless cockroach.

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    1. At 12:30 8 PM: My Friend (Mi Amigo) your comments are "point by point" explicit. I am sure that what you suggest has been thought of by the agents who promoted and installed surveillance systems.

      So my question is: "Why go to the bother of raising people's hopes?"
      Raising people's hopes then dashing them is both traumatic and only further erodes confidence that Mexico will ever become a first or second level nation. I have never believed for a moment that it is a modern democracy. Think of it, how can it be?
      1. Corrupt and inadequate educational system;
      2. Corrupt judicial and law enforcement systems;
      3. Corrupt political parties with ingrained bad habits and behaviors for their minions. Their voters are their least concerns except as dupes for their rhetoric at election time.
      4. Corrupt international relations that are covered over with sophisticated high sounding mechanisms that actually hide corrupt practices. We have outside international participants in Mexico's economy that are well aware of worker abuses (child labor, virtual enslavement, and ecological raping of the environment… Including endangered species of life.);
      and, 5. Make-believe Mechanisms: here I list the many mechanisms that Mexicans use to delude themselves that all is well or fixable. How can this be? Every time a legitimate hero arises, it is only a matter of time before they are compromised, neutralized, or disappeared. So without these kind of heroes everywhere where needed, how in the world will Mexico ever become a legitimate first world democracy?
      I sincerely hope that I am wrong!
      Mexico-Watcher

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    2. Interesting comment Mexico Watcher.

      E42


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    3. 5:25 as long as México is not in the hands of people like you, it will be going places, not every mexican is corrupt or exploited by the same kind of crooks all the time, after more than 200 of independence from europe and exploitation from the US, México is getting on more solid ground,
      but no thanks to you...

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  11. The cartel will use the cameras

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    1. The government is the biggest cartel of all!

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  12. People who watch those cameras will become big time targets I would think

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  13. The cameras etc wont last it wont take them long to figure out how to incapacitate he system

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    1. @Maria Soleada: I was thinking the same thing because the cartels have the power to " plata o plomo" cops and the systems they operate in.

      To me, Mexico is doomed, way beyond the point of no return. From the top oligarchs to the lowest peon corruption is a given. I have been following Borderline Beat for years and things keep getting worse.

      Let us come back in one year to assess this technology's crime-fighting effectiveness. I would love to eat my words!
      Mexico-Watcher

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  14. Can these cameras withstand a .50 BMG round? If not I'm afraid they waisted a lot of money

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    1. Yes. They can if you don't know where they are.

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  15. Imagine sitting in that room and just watching the screen as the cameras are shot out one by one until there isn't a single one left. Plus the IT admins probably work for the cartels anyways.

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    1. There are countless cameras already and the cartels do murders right in front of them... they couldn't care less.

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  16. EL TEMO/THE TEMOJuly 10, 2020 at 4:35 PM

    LOOK'S LIKE C.D.J/LA LINÉA IS UPGRADING THEIR SEKURITY UP A NOTCH

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  17. Let's take bets. How long before the cameras are vandalized and disabled..

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  18. if they remove liscence plates, amd cover their faces like they normally do, those cameras will simply be normal cameras

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  19. Sounds like Fake News
    wasted 11 million
    that couldve gone to pay a good wage to better police
    Stupid stupid

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  20. there are cameras all over mexico. manyvideos posted of crimes are from those cameras.

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    1. Correct chivis. And the killings continue.
      Desperate times have no care in the world.

      E42

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    2. Right but then the criminals are let out by corrupt officials i.e. La Gaviota who is a prison guard in the Juarez Cereso. Not sure is she is related to ACF but her last name is Carrillo. Word on the street is that she provides certain privileges to specific inmates that can afford it

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  21. The police just sit back and wait until the gunfire stops so what a waste of money. If all I had was a 9mm beretta and the bad guys had ak's and ar's with 100 round drum magazines I'd keep my skinny ass in the car as well.

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