Monday, June 29, 2020

Sister of Mexican Mafia member who ferried orders from prison is sentenced to 12.5 years

"MX" for Borderland Beat; USDOJ
"The Black Hand", Mexican Mafia symbol
LOS ANGELES – A Whittier, California woman who was convicted earlier this year on several charges related to her role as a “secretary” to an imprisoned Mexican Mafia member who controlled a street gang was sentenced today to 151 months in federal prison. Sylvia Olivas, 73, was sentenced by United States District Judge Dale S. Fischer for playing an active role in the affairs of the Canta Ranas street gang.

Following a 2½-week trial in February, a federal jury found Olivas guilty of participating in three separate conspiracies – one to violate the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization (RICO) Act, a second involving the trafficking of methamphetamine and heroin, and a third centered on money laundering.

For at least a decade, Olivas served as the secretary to her brother, David Gavaldon, a long-time member of the Canta Ranas street gang who was not charged in this case as he is serving a life-without-parole sentence in Pelican Bay State Prison. From prison, Gavaldon exerted control over Canta Ranas and other gangs, and he received compensation in the form of “rent” or “taxes” generated by drug trafficking and other offenses committed in gang territory.

Olivas regularly visited Gavaldon to discuss gang business and obtain orders that she brought back to the gang. Olivas “was a Mexican Mafia secretary in a large-scale racketeering enterprise – a powerful and highly respected role within this criminal organization,” prosecutors wrote in a sentencing memorandum.

“Despite her false and misleading statements in trial to cover up her involvement in the CRO [Canta Ranas Organization], the evidence overwhelmingly showed that defendant knew exactly what happened in the CRO and participated in it by passing messages from Mexican Mafia leader David Gavaldon to two generations of shotcallers, delivering edicts on extortionate taxes, secretly meeting with CRO members to collect taxes and launder them through her accounts to distribute them to David Gavaldon and his chosen recipients, and using code and other measures to cover her criminal activity from law enforcement.”

When she imposed the sentence this morning, Judge Fischer disputed Olivas’ contention that she should receive leniency because she had no prior criminal convictions. “She has been in trouble every day of her life helping the CRO, she was just never caught,” the judge said. Olivas was among 51 defendants charged in a 2016 federal grand jury indictment targeting Canta Ranas members and associates.

Nearly all of those defendants have been convicted, including Jose Loza, the “shotcaller” of the Santa Fe Springs and Whittier-based Canta Ranas gang, who was sentenced in March to life plus an additional 30 years in federal prison.

The RICO indictment targeting the Canta Ranas gang was the result of Operation Frog Legs, which was an investigation by the Southern California Drug Task Force, which is led by the Drug Enforcement Administration as part of the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) initiative.

19 comments:

  1. It was probably good the judge was a woman. A man might have bought the crocodile tears thing, but a woman wouldn't be fooled so easily. I hope the lady does that time.

    ReplyDelete
  2. There is a youtube channel called Perplex News and its full of stories from Ramon "Mundo" Mendoza about La Eme (Mexican Mafia)Mundo was a high ranking member who dropped out and turned snitch and now he is giving us all the stories from the horses mouth

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I posted 2 links to the perplex videos regarding the canta ranas gang and the women of la eme. For whatever reason it didn't make the cut.

      Delete
  3. CJNG Delta 1 arrested in Guanatos

    https://www.msn.com/es-mx/noticias/mexico/detienen-a-delta-1-l%C3%ADder-operativo-del-cjng/ar-BB167kWz?li=AAggxAT

    ReplyDelete
  4. Take down all the organized bottom dwellers.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Puro South Side Whittier

    ReplyDelete
  6. La Eme has only about 150 members and yet they have a stake in street crime in ALL of Cali

    ReplyDelete
  7. Good. Happy it's not ca prosecutors in charge or she'd of gotten off with a $10 fine and moral lecture.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Every city & town is controlled by some authority. Unfortunately, whether paying a legitimate aldermen or criminal organization, these influential parties dictate policies in many communities. Often disguised legitimately.

    ReplyDelete
  9. La EME controls the streets and most of the local, county and state institutions in Califas. Their is no other criminal organization in the state that has the sphere of influence and the operational capacity to inflict pain on friends or foes alike like the Carnales. Hardened criminals out of fear for themselves and families will kill at the drop of the hat to get on the good side of the organization. La EME is inherently discriminatory towards paisas and blacks. La EME embraces Mexican warrior culture, mythology and ancestry but is not a Mexican organization. Its comprised exclusively of Mexican Americans and Whites. Its legendary leader, palabra major and godfather Joe "Cocoliso" Morgan was of Croatian descent but grew up in the Chicano barrio of Maravilla in LA. Joe was fluent in Spanish & Nahuatl,
    charismatic, tough, intelligent, muscular with a 6'5" frame and considered himself 100% Chicano. Joe would not tolerate anyone disrespecting Chicanos in his presence. Joe was the youngest person sent to death row in CA at the tender age of 16 for murder. However, Joe aligned La EME with the Aryan Brotherhood because of his white roots and their mutual hatred for blacks. An alliance that remains in place since the late 60's. Now, La EME has recently flexed its muscles again ordering all So Cal gangs to seize all violence amongst themselves during COVID 19 and these protest against police brutality. In turn, warning people that looting in Chicano communities would not be tolerated and folks would be dealt with inside the jails.

    ReplyDelete
  10. La M is worst then belonging to a political group. First you have to put in work (be bosses bitch) both in prison and while on parole. On the streets you might catch a case or be dirty (drug test) for the only reason of taking drugs back into prison. While in prison your family is also ask to help the cause. Just like the case above. If your family has resources they might be ask to help the cause (tax). The money (taxes) has a one way street.

    ReplyDelete
  11. While working county I received an invitation to attend a Quinceañera of a made member family. A fish line was send out to catch a dirty cop. A favor is only paid with a favor. No thanks I have to work on that day. Years later some Colombian kid (young cop) was pick up for doing work for the gang...SDSO

    ReplyDelete
  12. There's a lot about David Galvadon in the book, The Black Hand. Its crazy how much these guys used their parents to help the cause.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Anybody know what the writing around the black hand says?...thanks BB.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It seems that is from a book cover. I have seen a couple Black Hand tattoos. El Chino Madrigal who later debriefed and a prison body. Most made members will shoot some shit once they have your streets credentials.

      Delete
    2. Nicksnames= placasos of menbers of the m.

      Delete
    3. This link will explain the words surrounding the black hand along with the person responsible for creating it and where they got the concept from.

      https://youtu.be/WABIadnFMrU

      Delete
  14. It's funny how they stole the black hand idea from the Italians

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com