Saturday, March 28, 2020

Mexico City gang enforces 'protection payments' despite coronavirus outbreak

"MX" for Borderland Beat


Street merchants in Mexico City's markets Tepito and La Merced
Gangsters from La Unión de Tepito, a Mexico City criminal group headed by Alberto Fuentes Castro ("El Elvis"), warned merchants that they will continue requesting protection racket payments from businesses during the coronavirus outbreak. Many of the businesses in these areas are temporarily closed and have suffered economic losses during the outbreak.

La Unión de Tepito controls the sale of counterfeit goods in Mexico City. The coronavirus outbreak has caused La Unión de Tepito to suffer millions in losses since businesses are unable to acquire Chinese merchandise to resale. La Unión de Tepito buys the merchandise in China directly by sending representatives and then resells the products to vendors in Mexico and/or charges a fee to those who sell Chinese merchandise in their turf.

Gangsters have warned merchants that they do not care about the virus outbreak and will continue to request their monthly fee. In previous weeks, merchants had warned gang members that they would stop paying them if they did not receive their Chinese merchandise. Business owners said La Unión de Tepito will kidnap and kill them if they do not comply.

Background and details
Last week, Borderland Beat shared an article about the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak in Mexico. It specifically mentioned how La Unión de Tepito would have a harder time adapting to the pandemic when compared to larger and more established criminal groups like the Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG), which can endure losses for longer periods of time.

Alberto Fuentes Castro ("El Elvis"), gang leader; (credit: LSR)
But merchants in Mexico City stated that La Unión de Tepito is not holding back on the requesting their monthly extortion payments. They expect businesses to continue paying them even if they are closed or not making a profit. Business owners claim that gang members travel across the area in motorcycles and kidnap and kill those who do not pay them. They asked the Mexico City mayor Claudia Sheinbaum Pardo to bring the National Guard to the area to prevent such measures from La Unión de Tepito.

Business owners stated that La Unión de Tepito had burned several businesses in Mexico City that failed to pay them. "Even though the local doesn't won't admit", one merchant said. The majority of the merchants do not go to authorities to formally file a complaint. In the last three years, 12 merchant group leaders from Mexico City's historic center were killed for exposing the extortion operations in the area.

Areas controlled by La Unión de Tepito
Most of the extortion operation headed by La Unión de Tepito are centered in Mexico City's historic center and in Cuauhtémoc borough. However, the gang also extorts street sellers in markets in Eje Central 1, Tepito and La Merced as well as the following neighborhoods: Centro, Roma, Juarez, and Peralvillo.

Extortion zone in Mexico City's historic center (credit: Milenio)
According to police reports, one of the main corridors for La Unión de Tepito is Eje 1 Norte, which runs from Reforma to Eje 1 Oriente Avenida del Trabajo. La Unión de Tepito operates in Morelos neighborhood, specifically in the boroughs Cuauhtemoc and Venustiano Carranza. They also have control of Centro neighborhood through a cell commanded by El Elvis.

Among the most important streets that La Unión de Tepito controls are: Costa Rica, Bolivia, Del Carmen, Guatemala, Perú, Colombia and Paraguay. This last street is one of El Elvis's centers of operation; in addition to being drug trafficking and retail drug sales, Paraguay street is where contraband merchandise from China is first assembled.

El Elvis commands Los Paraguayos (The Paraguayans, in reference to Paraguay street). They are a subgroup of La Unión de Tepito and are responsible for collecting protection racket payments from businesses in the area.

Source: Milenio

48 comments:

  1. Such shameful behavior practices shouldn't surprise anyone here. Prior to the COVID 19 terrorist attacks against its people were visible.
    Compassionate circumstances are not in anyone's handbook when revenue is involved.

    E42

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  2. These guys are scumbags. I wish upon these guys to be beheaded by Cjng. Puros huevones

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. La union de tepito works together with CJNG

      Delete
    2. 5:58 tas pendejo

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    3. Cjng/unión de Tepito = lo mismo chilangos

      Delete
  3. How the hell can the gang expect ppl to pay for goods if they aren't working?

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    Replies
    1. 2:43 that is their pinche pedo,
      if you care, send them money to pay their Union Dues, pinche huevón.
      Hey! Televisa could organize un Telethón and give the revenue to la union

      Delete
    2. Are you paying taxes during corona virus yes you are

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    3. It shows how brainless they are

      H”

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    4. They are not so smart, El Mayo needs to send los ántrax to clean house here they won’t extort

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    5. @ 9:09 I'm also getting a stimulus check for $1200 and unemployment benefits. Are the gangsters providing this to the merchants?

      Didn't think so...

      Delete
  4. This is one of the reasons the U.S. has the second amendment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes I got my pistol. Poor Mexicans, Criminals just walk all over. One thing for sure Criminals rule, we need help Aml

      Delete
    2. You gunnuts never cease to amaze me.
      That's right, shoot somebody that's extorting you. What do you think happens next? Three or four gangsters come back the next day with semiautomatic weapons, and spray you and anyone else on the premises.
      You watch too much TV. On TV, the good guys usually win. In real life, the bad guy have the element or surprise, and probably numbers, on their side.
      Now instead, organize other businesses on your street into autodefensas, and you've got a fighting chance.

      Delete
    3. The second amendment has never worked to curb crime.

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    4. On the US, gangs got bold the moment they knew the police would not get involved, police were heavily invested in Casinos and needed the area cleaned out for their new political force, sicarios, businessmen and gangbangers in collusion with each other...
      "City Hall Knew nothing about it" but promised lower taxes and smaller water Bills which now are higher than ever and a monthly quota,
      if you do not use the utilities YOU MUST STILL PAY MOTHERFACKERS!!!
      --The Teamsters were not such impressive criminals when they were the US truckers' business of Jimmy Hoffa, but now that they are the police and work for "casino businesmen partners" you, you, and you better watch out.

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    5. Nope it does not work that way. Fear would run through the minds of the criminals. They would think twice before running up on someone.

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    6. 5:01 PM So you are saying that cartels would be scared of some guy with a gun, even though they regularly have shootouts with the military?

      Delete
    7. Bob.. what are folks supposed to organize with? noodles? You anti gun nuts amaze me. You watch too much liberal tv.

      Delete
  5. Like some people say (me included): "Mexico is way behind the curve on things".

    IMO, these lifeblood bleeder are heading for wakeup calls. Maybe the day is soon coming where their victims are going to say "YA BASTA, CABRONES!".

    Remember the French Revolution, the America Revolution, and other revolutions... Mostly these were triggered when people finally woke up and banded together to deal with the victimizers....usually violently.
    In the French Revolution, the Guillotine was kept very busy decapitation just about anyone who was part of the oppressor class.
    IMO, AMLO is still a conventional politician who does not want a revolution. He sees the potential horrors that could come if citizens reach the "Ya Basta" breaking point. He must well understand that the corrupt rich and powerful and the criminal entities would all pay, many with their lives and properties, if the whole of Mexico's underclasses finally started dealing with their high and low victimizers.

    As I write, I do not see this happening.
    Mexico-Watcher

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The American Revolution? Slavery.

      Delete
    2. 5:52 ya basta cabron, stop blaming AMLO.
      rationally explaining why you blame him for every little piece of shit that comes out of your snout.
      You have never explained why "ALMO" is so bad in your opinion, never said who would be a better presidente of Mexico right now, or why, but you clearly have a problem and resort to propaganda without a reason...
      YA BASTA CABRON!

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    3. 3:56 PM would have us think of AMLO as a deity, it is how socialists heighten the rhetoric: the royal presidency almost Godlike. And they resort to personal attacks since they have nothing better to throw into the dialogue. In many ways these low brow socialists are just like the right wing fanatics who use the same tactics. Your nonsensical tantrum did nothing to further/relay your opinion, try civility and respect next time.

      Delete
    4. Glad someone put this individual in his place.

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    5. The American revolution was before slavery.hate say it they did that too have a place too make slaves..but ntl we kicked their asses but no Mexico is way too corrupt for something like that the group a be sold out too the first 2000 pesos

      Delete
    6. 8:26 the gang of "ya basta cabrones" started it, but a numbnut like you would not be able to see that.
      5:15 who put who where? and most important WHY???
      --Tás más GÜEY, VALIII, cocho!!!

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    7. 10;21 AM, we all see, the voice of socialism rears its ugly head. How well you prove a point about your political agenda, ram it down their throats, shout your message with childlike tantrums, oh my dear. The point about this article is the victimization of Mexicans trying to make a living and feed their families without fear and theft of their hard-earned profits, but like your political manifesto, you have said nothing that makes any sense toward remedying this. Oh, for yourself, you might try anger management.

      Delete
  6. i am calling for the killing of all drug gangsters on site at any time enough is enough

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Under Amlo the Cartels have grown so fast, the Cartels maybe en control.

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    2. @6:02 did you even read the article? This isn't about drugs. They are extorting business owners that sell counterfeit goods from China.

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    3. Not going to happen in Mexico. 100% cartels are protected by its politicians per state. Mexico is a washed up country. Its like syria, Yemen or somalia.

      Delete
    4. @ 2:18 Like those special interests groups, energy companies, pharmaceutical companies ect, who are protected by our very own.
      "Money before people" is the American policy. We wouldn't be in this situation if not for money. This delayed response by our governments financial institutions is why are in a world of shit. Prolonging the inevitable was our financial crisis.

      Delete
  7. And the president of Mexico does nothing about this.....I think this shows just to what extent the corruption of Mexico is......there is no will to take on the cartels so by default they win and more importantly the cartels know this.

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    Replies
    1. Pretty sure the same extortionist practices occur in the US with the Italian mafia. Criminal activities don't comply when times are tough. Why would this be any different elsewhere?

      Delete
    2. Here we go again. The Mexican president shouldn't be holding the hands of municipal officials to do their jobs.
      Only discipline and terminate those for not.

      Delete
    3. 6:02 the Presidente does not meddle in verdulera fights,
      Back in the 60s, el DF city mayor Uruchurtu sent police and military and razed la Candelaria de los Patos to the ground for being an eyesore like tepito, today's merchants could organize and clean themselves up, AMLO will side with them.
      That hood never came back

      Delete
  8. Dont forget about el Betito ay les wacho

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  9. This could be an opportunity. Hand over cash that is virus-coated.

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  10. Perfect. When they die from infected pesos, take their bully weapons.

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  11. MexicoCity + covid19 = ?

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  12. It is strange that there are thousands of merchants and way less criminals, and still the way less control everything.

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  13. Why does the government allow this to happen? I don’t know any business in the us that has to deal with this hullshit

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. U are naive if you think extortion practices do not exist in the US. How do u think they became so powerful? The Italians, Russians, Irish, Chinese, Ukrainian ect. depends on those businesses for enrichment. Just one of the many revenues that keep them flowing. And let's not forget those dear politicians who award permits for all businesses for a price.
      Suggest you do your research. Ask someone how it works, "u Pay to Play".


      Delete
    2. When the Italian mafia controlled urban areas of the east coast, it was commonplace.

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    3. 3:36 where do you think these guys got the idea FROM? 😆

      Delete
  14. What a fucking coward piece of shit.

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  15. The thing is. if the gang shows feelings, the shop owners will see a weakness and it will be TOUGH to extort after the corona virus is over.. It's still wrong THOUGH

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vultures prey on those living & dead. Same situation here despite the financial crisis overwhelming many today. These criminals aren't known for their charitable contributions like others who feed & cloth.

      Delete

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