Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Mexican Narcos, More Brazen by the Day, Land Coke Plane on a Highway and Shoot a General

Chivis Martinez Borderland Beat  Daily Beast



CALI, Colombia—Talk about a tough commute. 
Traffic was backed up for miles early Monday morning in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo after drug traffickers landed a twin engine prop plane on Highway 307, near the resort town of Bacalar.
The flight—which originated in South America and had been tracked by radar since entering Mexican airspace—touched down at about 4:30 a.m. A task force led by the senior commander of military operations in that state moved out to intercept.
When soldiers worked their way through the traffic jam caused by the plane they were met by a light cavalry force consisting of some 50 vehicles belonging to well-armed, ground-based accomplices who had been waiting for the delivery.
The sicarios had also cut down roadside trees and signs to create a makeshift runway for the aircraft. By the time the army showed up, the traffickers already were hustling to offload more than a half ton of cocaine.
In the pitched battle that followed, Mexican troops came under fire from military-grade weapons, including a high-powered .50 caliber sniper rifle. When the firefight was over the general in charge had been hit, his driver killed, and at least two more soldiers wounded. Two suspects were apprehended nearby. A portion of the contraband cargo, the .50 cal, a few other rifles, and two vehicles also were seized. The pilots and other traffickers, along with an unknown quantity of narcotics, apparently escaped.
To make room for more marching powder, the plane had been gutted of all seats save the pilots’. Authorities retrieved 26 individually wrapped packages of cocaine in the raid, altogether weighing some 600 kilograms (1,320 pounds). Given that the average U.S. street price for the drug is about $96 per gram, that makes the captured haul worth some $57,600,000 dollars
Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador issued a rather laconic statement later that day about the “confrontation,” confirming that the raid was indeed led by General José Luis Vásquez Araiza, who heads up the 34th military zone, and that “unfortunately they shot him.”
Quintana Roo Governor Carlos Joaquín González took to Twitter to offer his condolences to the soldiers and their families and to praise their “hard work and courage ensuring the security of Quintana Roo.”
Boilerplate rhetoric aside, security in Quintana Roo is in relatively short supply of late, as cartels carry out turf wars in areas once safe for tourists. The Associated Press reported six people were killed in drug-related violence over the weekend in the popular beach town of Cancún, farther north on the same highway where the plane landed.
This once placid region in southeast Mexico, near the border with Belize, is now part of a major smuggling corridor, which led to Quintana Roo’s murder rate nearly tripling in 2018. Though homicide rates fell slightly in 2019, decapitated and dismembered victims still draw unwelcome attention from the press, stoking fears that the steady stream of foreign visitors, so crucial to the local economy, might be scared away.
The image of a drug plane blocking traffic on a national highway in broad daylight has drawn eyeballs throughout the hemisphere. But the incident also highlights just how bold and fearless the cartels have become.   
Most cocaine that enters the United States from South America makes a stopover in Mexico. It comes by land, sea, and air, in shipping containers and submarines and modified planes like the one captured this week. Cocaine production in the Andean nations is soaring, especially in Colombia, which now produces about 70 percent of the global supply.
To enhance their profits, Mexican cartels have recently taken to importing raw coca paste and refining it in their own country, so as not to have to pay middlemen to cook it on site. As heroin and marijuana have steadily declined in value, thanks to synthetic opioids and legalization respectively, cocaine remains a more stable and valuable commodity—making the cartels “desperate” to obtain it, according to Robert Bunker, a security analyst with the U.S. Army War College.
What Bunker describes as “the cartels’ increasing brazenness” is also fueled by their growing power, it seems, to get away with just about anything, including colluding with senior Mexican officials. In the last month, U.S. prosecutors have charged two high-level Mexican national police officers with taking millions in bribes. 
“They have become so used to operating with such high levels of impunity that this is becoming the new standard of their activities,”  Bunker told The Daily Beast.
In reference to the airborne smuggling episode in Quintana Roo, a high-ranking source within one of Mexico’s cartels (who requested anonymity for security reasons) described the operation as daring to the point of being foolhardy.
“I am surprised that a group with access to a plane and that amount of cocaine would land on a road instead of a more secure location,” the source said. He also said the tactics were “sloppy” and suggested the lack of “lookouts” and “exit routes” indicated the traffickers might be too cocky for their own good.
“There should have been blockades ready in case they were under surveillance,” he said.
Bunker said one of the more likely culprits behind the highway-as-tarmac plot is the Jalisco New Generation Cartel [CJNG]. Now one of the nation’s most powerful crime groups, the CJNG has been encroaching on Quintana Roo for the last few years, driving the surge in violence there.
Bunker also said the presence of a .50 caliber rifle and other assault weapons is in line with the CJNG’s paramilitary profile. Additionally, one of the two men arrested at the scene was a Jalisco native.
“The cartel unit was more than willing to go toe-to-toe with the Mexican armed forces in a tactical engagement,” said Bunker. That’s also in line with CJNG’s aggressive behavior, as the cartel has also shot down army helicopters and attacked military convoys in the past.
Quintana Roo isn’t the only tourist hotspot suffering from new and unusually high levels of violence in Mexico. Once the playground of Hollywood elites, Acapulco is now among the most dangerous cities in the Americas. Tijuana, on the border with California, was the site of a record-breaking 2,518 murders in 2018. Even Mexico City, long thought to be the safe-zone free from organized crime, has been rocked by gun battles among armed groups. Murders in Mexico reached an all-time high last year, with more than 35,500 victims.
Part of the spike in killings is due to the cartel world fragmenting, meaning no one group can maintain order and hegemony—what Bunker calls a “Pax Mafiosa”—over its territory.
Up until a few years ago, places like Quintana Roo had been relatively exempt from narco violence because government officials and powerful business owners—including wealthy investors from within established criminal organizations—wanted to keep the tourist dollars rolling in.
But today’s new breed of next-gen narcos like the CJNG have shown themselves all too willing to challenge that hierarchy. In Quintana Roo, the move of CJNG into tourist safe havens “is slowly changing the ‘off-limits’ rules that once existed,” Bunker said
“These groups do not fear kicking over the old economic interests in Mexico or the power structure that exists behind them.”
The cartel insider agreed that the security situation in places like Quintana Roo could continue to worsen. 
“The narcos are getting bolder,” he said, “and it isn’t going to get better.”

46 comments:

  1. Como de pelicula pero fue en Vida real ,ke Mario almada ni ke la chingada

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  2. Stupid move... this kind of cockiness is what got Escobar taken out. More brazen they get the bigger target on their back.

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    1. 10:46 AM To late their is all ready a small insurgency in Mexico. A full scale war can occur at any moment where entire groups are formed on two opposing sides instead of how its been where it was everybody against everybody. All it takes is a small spark for things to get out of control.

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  3. Thankyou for the report...Quintana Roo is going off...another plane a Gulfstream Jet landed in Mahahual yesterday loaded with coke....

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    1. It's the guy that says he is there, but really somewhere else.

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    2. I am watching the news here in Acapulco, evidently 10:58's story is true.

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    3. Well...that statement made alot of sense... to someone who has none

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    4. I keep getting my comments deleted....2 heads outside the Hard Rock hotel n resort...both Cancun n Playa have had up too 7 murders per day...headless bodies dumped in cenotes....the head Cartel Jaliscos man in Cancun...was arrested then turned loose in Cancun....hes columbian.."Sapo"...schools were closed in Cancun...some reporting the Jaliscos threatened the schools if Sapo wasn't turned loose......

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  4. The locals say the general was there to collect the "mordida" and something went wrong...why else would a general be in the thick of things out in the jungle

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    1. In the middle of the traffic with everyone around he was going to collect and what just walk off like nothing?

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    2. Can't you fuckin read? They were tracking the plane from south america until it landed in mexico where the military was waiting to capture the criminals.

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    3. @11:01 Exactly right! AMLO does not seem too surprised, maybe the general is his guy. Wouldn't be surprised.

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    4. Yeah I can read...have you ever been on that road?? I have and had friends there stuck in traffic....the narcos blocked the hiway n made off with the majority of the load...the military came much later..

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  5. You mean after CDS rescue of Chapos son Ovidio or some shit like that people still get surprised when narco do this kind of crap???
    Talk about being naive!

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    1. I don't think it is about being naive, but rather trying to paint a picture of innocence, whilst being 'deeply involved'. Massmedia keep om pitching this as something new when in fact it has been going on for years.

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  6. Meanwhile the STUPID president giving his USELESS daily speeches, I tought Peña Nieto was the stupid but POS obrador is in a diferent level.

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    1. Even though enrique peña nieto was a corrupted leader. He still was tuff on the cartels. Same as Felipe Calderon although he was secret working for the sinaloa cartels. Like when the army and pf were trying to capture la familia michoacan druglord. The shootout lasted for 2 days. Thats what I read one time about that operation. Calderon didn't tell his troops to give up just like amlo. Although the druglord escaped with injuries. Its scary to think that those 2 former presidents were tough on the cartels even though they were corrupted. If the pri or pan were still in power and the urban warfare in culiacan occured during there presidency. They wouldn't back off and still keep on fighting even if they have to break human rights violation and send black hawk helicopters and tanks probably. Mostly enrique peña nieto will use deadly force and no mercy in culiacan.

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    2. *on a different level

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    3. Previous efforts of stemming the violence and drug trafficking didn't do squat. Consumption rates continue at an all time high. Along with availability globally.
      Why continue a process that shows no signs of progress? Only that of homicides.

      E42

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  7. Tourist dollars are nothing compared to the narco profit. Aint no stopping the corruption and killing in mexico..

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  8. Lawless Mexico, 48 cars just don't disappear. President wants to give cartel hugs, They got the green light to unload on the highway from the President, he has to be on the taking money for releasing chapati.
    I thought Guns were illegal in Mexico and the laws harsh?? This country a joke.

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  9. What's the source for that "$96/gram average US street price" statistic?

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  10. This brazen defiance of the law screams cjng. Very disorganized too. I imagine heads will roll. No metaphor

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  11. We need footage of this

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  12. I hope Mexico sinks into a civil war, it’s for the best. They were tracking the air plane since it left South America, it crashed.. and they still got away with most of the dope and killed a General while they were at it. Are you shitting me? On top of that the president doesn’t even give a fuck, gotta get him out

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    1. What the fuck is a general doing running and gunning?

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  13. Several planes have landed in neighboring Belize.

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  14. Dont know who gave this fool his coke prices but $96 bucks for gram is a little to steep

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  15. Dont know who gave this fool his coke prices but $96 bucks for gram is a little to steep

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  16. "that makes the captured haul worth some $57,600,000 dollars"

    No, it absolutely doesn't, that is only the price relative to a specific location after specific risks and borders were crossed. It's worth max 10 times less than that in Mexico.

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  17. 96 sound about right,it lands in mex and 1 key gets cut into 2 or 3. then it hits the usa and it gets cut even more. where the wholesale is anywhere from 18-38 a gr. depending what zone. and the resale is anywhere from 40-100 depending on the zone and your connect (all cut up, or little to no cut from the already cut mex stop)

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    1. Lmao... You watch too many movies buddy...i see pure cocaine here in the USA ALL the time..cut shit doesnt sell

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    2. You're part of the problem...

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    3. 449 the problem is mostly people with money use, its never going to stop. instead of seeing it as a problem, treat it as something else. I just see it as a means to keep payroll of all agents and the law profiting from seizures, etc.

      600
      I learned it all from the movies buddy. follow the stamps. they really do tell the story.

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    4. 449 the problem is mostly people with money use, its never going to stop. instead of seeing it as a problem, treat it as something else. I just see it as a means to keep payroll of all agents and the law profiting from seizures, etc.

      600
      I learned it all from the movies buddy. follow the stamps. they really do tell the story.

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    5. No you don't 6:00. You have never ever seen pure cocaine because it gets stepped on before it even crosses the border

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    6. I got this coke one time that looked almost like Dipin Dots, everyone thought it was fake. Even experienced users and people who rocked it. Came back to pretty much 100%. Never in my life have I seen anything like it again. Also if you know basic chemistry, you can cleanup your coke.

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  18. Why didnt the Mexican Air Force intercept ? This plane could have crashed in area of houses etc
    If Mexico has rader it would have shown no runway and flight plan of this plane So If a forigen plane crashs into Mexico City Captiol no problem !
    Where does your President live ?
    Is mexican Airspace just a fly free zone ?

    Pretty scary Many must have known about this Top officals Mexicos Air Force etc to allow a plane this size land with out any other air force aircraft following think it a threat
    Just WOW
    And the comment about the President in power only one year useing excuses why he hasnt done anything BS on You
    He dosent care for these small indian villiages or the children
    He feels like most Top Officals and rich they are above the indian blood Because they have Spanish blood in them
    Racist runs deep in Mexico between the so called Spanish Mexicans and the real indian blood pheasent farmers
    Shame on The President of Mexico
    And all of his rich greedy supporters
    He has the power to send help to these small villages but he dosent get anything in return to do so
    No Child should have to arm them selves




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  19. I'm sure they were flying 'below the radar' so to speak but not literally.They would not have filed a flight plan and flew with the transponder off.The transponder is a 4 digit code given by Air Traffic Control and that way they can track you on the radar but if you don't have that # given to you you won't show up on radar.Actually you will but you are unidentified.During 911 they knew whoever had taken over the planes turned off the transponders and there is a 4 digit code for hijacking that a pilot can turn on to let ATC know without speaking but all was switched off on purpose that's how they knew these guys had some flight training.

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    1. Either that or they read in the library copy of Popular Mechanics about the existence of the transponder, where its switch is located, what it is for and how to turn it off. Bombardier to copilot, over and out.

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    2. If unidentified Wouldnt that cause more concern ?
      A major highway a plane lands out side of Mexico City
      And Mexicos air force is No where to be found ?
      Really this just makes my heart sink You poor people to have no control or protection
      Its the innocent children I really worry about No future
      To be raised in a Gang Drug filled home cant be kind
      I see the destruction Meth Crack Heroin does here to children the abuse and deaths are applauling .. The brass balls for these guys to land on a highway loaded with drugs
      Where are your police to track these guys down Who gets this plane ?
      Amazing Just Amazing

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    3. 6:06 The so called police and military are most likely the ones running the show. Look at all the recent articles on about cartel members escaping prison with the inside help of the authorities. This thing about police military and planes full of drugs landing on public streets is the same game just a different environment and different players. You cant' tell a player without a program. Get yours.

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  20. I remember this mission in GTA vice city. Although I used a grenade launcher to take out the lead cop

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  21. Conspiracy theory: The Narcos were sending a message to the Army units that responded. They had been getting out of hand, and had demanded a bribe of 600 kilos dropped off on that highway. So to show the soldiers who's boss they landed their whole plane on the highway, shot the general and killed his driver, then left the 600 kilo bribe in the plane.

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