Tuesday, September 17, 2019

El Gil---the assassin of 43 AMLO wants answers of why key suspects were released

Parro for Borderland Beat Milenio


The release of 21 municipal police officers detained in connection with the disappearance of 43 students in Iguala, Guerrero, in 2014, is a sign of the “wretchedness and rot” of Mexico’s justice system, according to human rights undersecretary Alejandro Encinas.

He told a press conference on Sunday that the decision of Judge Samuel Ventura Ramos to absolve the officers is an “affront to the victims, to their parents and to justice.

“It’s a mockery of justice because it feeds silence and complicity . . .” Encinas added.


The undersecretary also said that the judge’s ruling is an affront to the investigative work currently being carried out by the federal government to determine exactly what happened to the 43 students from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers College.

Encinas said that Ventura didn’t follow a legal precedent that establishes that in cases where evidence was obtained through the use of torture, people accused of committing a crime must be subjected to a new investigative process rather than being acquitted.

The judge ordered the officers’ release on the grounds that statements they made to prosecutors in the previous government were obtained by illegal means, including torture.

Encinas accused Ventura of hypocrisy, stating that while he exonerated the police because of the torture to which they were subjected, he didn’t assign any responsibility to those who allegedly committed the torture.

The judge’s ruling gave precedence to the interests of the alleged perpetrators of crime over the rights of its victims, the undersecretary charged.

“The judge interpreted the law with a lot of laxity . . . He didn’t impart justice and caused serious damage to the search for truth,” Encinas said.

The previous government’s “historical truth” – that the students were intercepted by corrupt municipal police and handed over to the Guerreros Unidos crime gang who killed them and burned their bodies in a municipal dump – has been widely rejected.

President López Obrador’s government has established a truth commission to conduct a new investigation into the case.

Encinas’ criticism of Judge Ventura and the Mexican justice system came a week and a half after he slammed the same judge for the release of Gildardo López Astudillo, who was allegedly the plaza chief in Iguala of the Guerreros Unidos gang at the time of the students’ disappearance.

Declaring that the release of the key suspect set “a very grave precedent,” Encinas announced on September 4 that the government would ask the Attorney General’s Office (FGR) and the Federal Judiciary Council to investigate officials and judges responsible for granting freedom to López Astudillo and others who were arrested in connection with the case.

On Sunday, Encinas applauded the decision of the FGR to launch investigations into former attorney general Jesús Murillo Karam – who first announced the “historical truth” – as well as former Criminal Investigation Agency chief Tomás Zerón and former Ayotzinapa investigation chief José Aarón Pérez.

They are “ex-officials who must be held accountable by the Attorney General’s Office,” he said.

Note:: this guy was in charge of transporting and killing the 473.  He was caught on audio.    Now almost all of those arrested for this mass mjurder have been released

19 comments:

  1. Love the Mexican justice system, out to do more killings and curuption.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same thing here in the USA. Young white girls gets away with a spanking for killing and burying her child at the backyard. Mentally ill people can buy machine guns without proper background check. USA is no better in a broader scope.

      Delete
    2. Which is the capital of curruption and homicides in the world? Here's a hint starts with the letter M.

      Delete
    3. Our justice system is unforgiving but it is nowhere near as corrupt as Mexico's. We just throw people's lives away for dumb shit.

      Delete
    4. 7:49 are you going to shut Mexico in the ass?
      Because the criminals will get away with their crime that way.
      Intelligent investigations will make sure and find out who was in charge of C4 monitoring all day that day, since the real kidnappers of the 43 who also murdered 7 more people left Mexico City in military uniforms and vehicles early that day... And then who was in charge of the whole operation of o stop the Ayotzinapos from going to Mexico City to protest once again about Tlatelolco crime of state in MEXICO 68, something that has been done for about 50 years now but specially hated if the Ayotzinapos took part on it. Emilio Chuayfett Chemor secretary of education, Ruben Figueroa Alcocer, angel aguirre Rivero and others had done the same crimes when zedillo and his jundillo were president, they even resigned then, but this time they left no witnesses behind.

      Delete
  2. So it's okay to torture innocent people to make false statements. While the same judicial process is not valid by government officials.
    Great job Mexican officials for continuing to display to the world of its Human rights violations.

    That's Mexico for you.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow out in 4 years for killing 43 defenseless students.

    ReplyDelete
  4. There isn't 5% of corruption of this magnitude in the US. The govt needs to be completely overhauled from the top down. Duarte from the Philippines style combat against the cartels until they reach a agreement because this is going to spiral way worst before it becomes better

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree whole heartedly. Only a ruthless and crazy SOB like Duterte could clean a mess like this up. Or a dictator. Either or but something's gotta give..

      Delete
    2. What are u talking about? The government are the cartels. Each with money to bribe, kill and collect from their coffers.

      Delete
    3. @4:43 that is a scary thought. Then again, things continuing and getting worse is just as scary

      Delete
    4. 4:43 & 11:33 Rodrigo Duterte himself is a real drug addicted dopefiend, he should start by killing his own motherfacking ass instead of cleaning the Philippines out of the "poor suspects and dirty looking people who look like drug dealers" to make the land and cities look proper to casino and hotel "developers" who want Duterte to invest Philippines money in their shit for their own benefit, a pattern all over the world...

      Delete
  5. What have we learned here kids: Commit murder in Mexico it will only cost you 1 or 3 years. Then after you done that time you are cleared of any wrong doing... I applaud the government … Every serial killers dream world.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Exijo el fin de EL FUERO y la rendición de cuentas de los funcionarios de justicia, incluida la aplicación de Gran Delito con la destitución, el embargo de activos y la aplicación de la prisión.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Key suspects are released because your country is corrupt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1:34 you can't keep named suspects in prison sepecially when it was proven they were tortured into confession, and even more, specially when it has been proven there was a pack of lies from a criminal government like EPN protecting its own nasty shitty ass from prosecution and through historic lies.

      Delete
  8. Can someone explain the motive for killing the students?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 5:29 they had been putting together a March to Mexico City to participate in the protests about MEXICO 68 TLATELOLCO CRIME OF STATE where the government murdered students and people and disappeared hundreds of people, something that has been done for about 50 years by students from all over Mexico...
      This time the Ayotzinapos were dealt "a lesson" by the corrupt government of EPN.

      Delete
  9. Looks like the "jefe de plaza" was crying before his mug shot. Real tuff homie

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com