Monday, September 9, 2019

Creel: The First Massacre In Mexico's War On Drugs: 2008

Chivis Martinez Borderland Beat Telesur

NOTE:  Reading Yaqui's amazing post on  Mirosalva Breach , reminded me of when I landed in Mexico and was told about the Creel Massacre Yaqui mentions it in her post.  See a post about the massacre below.  Yaqui's post is a MUST READ, she worked on it for days wading through the research.  Please give it a go.....Chivis


Young people were participating in a barefoot family race in Creel, one carrying his baby in his arms, when a group of unidentified assailants opened fire.

It marked ten years ago on August 16, 2018, when an armed group entered a small town in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua and opened fire, killing 12 young people and a baby. The tragedy marked the first civilian massacre in Mexico's so-called war on drugs, but there's no end in sight.

 The people of Creel, alongside State Governor Javier Corral, marched at noon local time then held a mass in memory of the victims, with words of support for bereaved family and friends. The event was organized by the Solidarity and Human Rights Defense Commission.

On August 16, 2008, young people were participating in a barefoot family race, one carrying his baby in his arms, when a group of unidentified assailants opened fire. The police and other authorities had already fled left the town, at the entrance of the Tarahumara mountain chain –one of the zones most affected by organized crime.

When the massacre began, the town's Jesuit priest Javier Avila Aguirre was giving a mass. In the absence of authorities, he assumed a leadership role and, with the help of local people, collected evidence on the orders of State Prosecutor Patricia Gonzalez Rodriguez.

The victims were lberto Villalobos Chavez; Juan Carlos Loya Molina; Daniel Alejandro Parra Mendoza; Alfredo Caro Mendoza; Luis Javier Montañez Carrasco; Fernando Adan Cordova Galdean; Kritian Loya Ortiz; Edgar Alfredo Loya Ochoa; Alfredo Horacio Aguirre Orpinel; Luis Daniel Armendáriz Galdean; Oscar Felipe Lozano Lozano, Edgar Arnoldo Loya Encinas and Rene Lozano.

"We will keep the memory alive, even though the systems bet on oblivion," said Avila, the priest. "I'll retake the case as a councilor because we won't accept this tragedy – the first massacre in the country – gets filed away."

Two years later came the massacre of Salvacar in Ciudad Juarez, in which 15 high school students were killed at a party. Then San Fernando, in which 72 Central and South American migrants were executed. By 2011, the Reforma news outlet had reported 70 massacres in Mexico.

Many such crimes go unpunished  while those seeking justice are criminalized and persecuted by cartels and corrupt authorities alike. Daniel Parra Urias, father of one of the boys killed in Creel and one of the most high-profile activists in the case, was murdered in 2009.

Two months after the Creel massacre, authorities arrested Luis Raul Perez. Prosecutors claim Perez handed over a truck to Sandro Romero, one of the accused, and was present at a meeting with hitmen prior to the murders. He is also accused of being in charge of notifying the killers by radio if any police approached.

Romero was also arrested but later released in 2014 due to lack of evidence. Jorge Salvador Villa was also released early, in 2012, after collaborating in the case. Ivan Montes Gonzalez, nephew of former Prosecutor Patricia Gonzalez, was also accused of participating, but was killed in 2013.

Prosecutors have issued arrest warrants for Oscar Alberto Mancinas and Antonio Casavantes Calderon, both of whom remain at large.

"The current cases and the past ones are united by impunity; the cry for justice, the cry to not bury any of the cases," said Avila.

Relatives of the victims participated in the search for truth and protested impunity after the tragedy. They blocked the only tourist train in Mexico, the Chepe, which stops in Creel, and the main highway that enters the mountain chain.

The motives for the massacre are still unknown.

37 comments:

  1. Can we see some pics of those creeps? = Oscar Alberto Mancinas and Antonio Casavantes Calderon,

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    1. Creel is a juarez chiquito en la sierra. Nice.

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  2. For the CDS Chapo cheerleaders who were still in elementary school, aquí tienen a su padre para que lo juzguen bueyes.

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  3. Who killed the baby in 2008? CDS!

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    1. That was Juarez Cartel/Linea.

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    2. They are the original baby killer cartel, and snitches

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    3. It was ppl under Chapo s command and orders

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    4. 1:02 im from Chihuahua. It was CDS.

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  4. Anyone that cheerleads for one cartel over the other is sick. One cartel is as bad as the other. They are all robbers of the dignity of Mexico. No one respects Mexico, especially it's own citizens. No pasa nada.

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    1. You guys should be mad at USA for allowing this to go on

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    2. True. USA also has blame too

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    3. Some of the stories on this site are horrible and sad to read. But what is worse, is to see the comments below from people cheering on one group of criminals over another. Is this really what Mexico has come to?? Do people really believe that cheering for one over another is going to make things better? It's pathetic and sickening. They are basically cheering for one terrorist organization over another. Let's be honest...that's what these criminals are...terrorists. They don't have to be from the middle east to be called that. They spread fear among the public and promote their propaganda, among all the other atrocities, yet people of Mexico cheer for them. Sad & Pathetic.

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    4. @12:30 prohibition is enforced globally by the US. Only few nations dare to take exception.

      Drug prohibition is a vital part of the politics of internal social control in the US.

      Prohibition (=drugs with which you fuck up yourself are illegal) coupled with the right to carry guns (=guns with which you fuck up other people are legal) ensures that
      - prisons are full
      - budgets for police and security services are bloated
      - laws are passed which infringes on privacy and civili liberties
      - the environment in which poor people live is thrashed preventing them from organizing themselves

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    5. I agree and seeing ppl talk about it like theyre talking about their favorite baseball team. So and so switched to this cartel they had back room meetings and this one allowed the other to do this like they wete there its ridiculous

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    6. 1:14 mass shooters are also terrorists yet being that most are Caucasian, so called experts and even the President who is NO expert wants to downplay their actions and call them "mentally insane"???

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    7. At 4:48...agreed! Mass shooters should be charged with terrorism and not labeled mentally insane. That moniker is such a cop-out.

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    8. Oh yes....this is completely the fault of the United States. Mexican cartels shipping drugs around the world, but it’s the USAs fault??? When will Mexico take responsibility for their own corruption??? Start there first. Mexico needs to look in the mirror before pointing the finger.

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    9. 2:31- what's your point? Drug legalization? Gun control? Less govt agencies? I'm confused.
      4:48- cable news on both sides use experts and statistics push whatever narrative they are going for. I would suggest doing some research online that is apolitical. I'm no fan of the president but is anybody who kills another person outside of self defense or war considered at least temporarily insane? Not trying to criticize, these are hard topics of conversation with no easy answers! Especially when one asks these kinds questions about Mexico!

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    10. Cali- what more can the US do? The US gov has given millions and millions to Mexico over the years for training, police salary, and equipment, and the money is pocketed by politicians...and how much more can us put its agents and Troops in another country, would they really be welcomed? Now, much can be said about the stupid us citizens they buy the drugs but after so many years will the continuance of the war on drugs make a difference?

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    11. 7:01 the only reason the U.S. gives any money to Mexico is so that Mexico can fight the deug addiction the U.S. has. In other words the U.S. cannot stop its citizens from consuming drugs so it asks Mexico to stop cartels from getting them into the country. The U.S. does not give CASH to Mexico however. Most of the money is given in training forms, education and equipment also.

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  5. Any news on the 50 people kidnapped tortured and killed?
    Greatly appreciated thanks.

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  6. First massacre my @$$

    What about what Ramon AF did to the Limon and Torres family??

    The Zetas and La Familia massacres of 2006-07?

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    1. Ensenada massacre 1997.

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    2. @1:17 of the drug war foo!

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    3. This is the first massacre of the mexican drug war as accepted by historians. Perhaps the distinction is the mass murder of innocents. and the drug war is known as when calderon took office and declared the war on drugs

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  7. Is this the same massacre around the time El Cumbias and his convoy were recorded in creel?

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    1. Is el cumbias in us custody?

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    2. Yes el cumbias y GN, CDS proxies.

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    3. No, I think it's a different one but could be wrong

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    4. El cumbias was 2010 chapo was almost caught at cumbias daughters 15 btw

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  8. Anyone know who running Creel at the moment?

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  9. If the US government would get a grip on the rampant drug use and make treatment for addicts more accessible to addicts and the demand of drugs would go down there would be a lot less death in Mexico. The government will never get ahold on this in the US or Mexico.

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    1. Even if the US "got a grip" on the rampant drug use...Mexico would still have the same problems. Mexico has rampant drug use as well. 7:17...you forget that the cartels are already extorting working citizens of Mexico, so that would continue. You also forget that the cartels export drugs to other countries...so that would continue as well. If the US got a grip on the drug use, the only country to benefit would be the US, NOT Mexico!

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    2. Los dólares le dan mucho poder a los criminales. Sin esas ganancias con que compran armas, sicarios y políticos?

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  10. Wow, this is truly sad. Anyone who cheers for a cartel need they ass whooped. Mexico as a whole has failed. The government and military have failed it's people and yes America is to blame also. America has the biggest appetite for drugs and none of this would be going on in Mexico if it wasn't for Americans and they drug use

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  11. Thing will get better. Amlo says?

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  12. "Ten years ago in 2018" oh dam i must been hella drunk i'm 10 years behind im still in 2019

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