Monday, July 29, 2019

Former Mexican Police Officer Charged w Trafficking Huge Amounts of Fentanyl

Yaqui for Borderland Beat from: DEA Press

Former Mexican Police Officer Charged with Trafficking Enough Fentanyl to Kill 10 Million People.

A federal grand jury in Amarillo, Texas has indicted a former Mexican municipal police officer for fentanyl trafficking, announced U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas Erin Nealy Cox.

In a superseding indictment filed Thursday evening, Assmir Contreras-Martinez, 30, of Tucson, Arizona, was charged with conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid 50 times more potent than heroin.

He was allegedly discovered with roughly 33 kilograms of the drug – likely enough to kill more than 10 million people, according to DEA experts.

“Fentanyl is devastating communities across the country,” said U.S. Attorney Nealy Cox. “We cannot tolerate the trafficking of this deadly drug through North Texas— especially by those who are charged with protecting our communities, foreign or domestic.”

“Fentanyl is the number one threat causing our opioid epidemic in the United States,” said Clyde E. Shelley, Jr., DEA Special Agent in Charge of the Dallas Division. “This seizure alone has potentially save millions of lives.”

According to a criminal complaint filed earlier this summer, Mr. Contreras-Martinez was pulled over by a Texas DPS trooper driving eastbound on Interstate 40 in Amarillo in May 2019.

A search of his vehicle, a 2007 Ford Explorer, allegedly revealed approximately 33 kilograms of a white powdery substance, which the trooper suspected to be drugs, likely cocaine. Subsequent testing revealed the substance was actually fentanyl.

After being advised of his rights, Mr. Contreras-Martinez allegedly admitted he was paid $6,000 to transport illegal contraband from California to Florida. This was his second such trip, he said.

During that interview, Mr. Contreras-Martinez allegedly stated that before his unlawful immigration to the United States seven months prior, he had been employed for eight years as a municipal police officer in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico.

An indictment is a formal accusation of criminal conduct, not evidence, and the defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

If convicted, Mr. Contreras-Martinez faces 30 years to life in federal prison, and may face deportation proceedings after serving his sentence.

Overdoses involving synthetic opioids like fentanyl killed almost 32,000 Americans last year, according to provisional data released by the CDC last week. Because of the drug’s deadly potency, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Texas has a zero-tolerance policy on fentanyl, taking federally any case that involves the substance or its unlawful analogues, no matter the quantity.

The Texas Department of Public Safety and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration conducted the above investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Anna Marie Bell is prosecuting the case.


31 comments:

  1. $6000 for this amount of drugs to be transported is not worth loosing ones freedom. And yet many participants fail to realize such reality only when it's too late.
    This is the reality of easy money.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You know anything about real poverty?
      You know anything about needing money to repay a debt in Mex?

      Delete
    2. 2:03 Mexican Police Officers make very good pay compared to many other professions, very little education needed to be a cuico.
      Problem is when they go shaking down people their bosses start eating up their pay in exchange for keeping them on the job. Dealing drugs involves risks of more than a half hour getting a ticket on the road, don't even think about it.

      Delete
  2. Majority of these criminals are either government officials or municipal officials. No surprise here.
    Question is? Will this individual get the punishment he deserves?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes he will darling, US does not play, he will get many years, it happened in US, not in Mexico.

      Delete
    2. 9:23 on the US nothing is a big deal,
      if you have proper Godfathers.
      In US prison you must become an ordained priest or something to start proving you are rehabilitated, and most of all, sing baby, like a canary. It will help.

      Delete
  3. Is somebody making up the potential killing power?
    In the labs we have seen in Mexico there is almost no safety equipment but the most primitive elements of a common clandestine US still like popcorn used to design from rusted out steel drums.
    The mortality is not in doubt here, but more needs to be said about who got those people addicted, like cigarettes we used to pick and leave at will, now you smoke a few and get hooked for life, because of the additives, opioid epidemic prosecutions and cover-up fans are still doing battle over how fast and how soon they do the cover-ups, and that is the bottom line, no prison or persecutions for honest dealers of death who paid their senators and congressmen to have laws made special to order for benefit of their political $$pon$$or$$.

    ReplyDelete
  4. People trafficking fentanyl need to be charged with possessing a weapon of mass destruction.

    Phelpso

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually it's fine, it will wipe out the users.

      Delete
    2. Hay si...

      What about the liquor stores, casinos and "state" lotteries?

      Delete
    3. Agreed. That stuff is the definition of evil greed. Might as well be trafficking anthrax.

      Delete
    4. 1132 I agree that those using it will overdose and die. That drug ruins families, jobs, they steal and Rob for the next needed fix

      Delete
    5. Actually if the drug addict uses it improperly and dies that's fine with me. They shouldn't be using drugs in the first place.They rob people, places to get thier next fix.

      Delete
    6. 10:00 Addicts are still people, they need help, because addicts can't help themselves, obviously.
      Moreover, the addict you help today could be your brother or sister or your gay lover, or one of many, or your son or daughter.
      You should not be wishing for others what you do not wish for yourself, after all, we are all in the same ship.
      Even the traffickers are just addicted to the money, but never make it worth it like Real Millionaires.

      Delete
  5. imagine transporting 33 keys of the most malicious drug on the planet for 6,000$ … lol

    ReplyDelete
  6. Los estadounidenses necesitan presentar planes para una expansión del 500 por ciento de la prisión en el estado de Colorado en Florencia. Dejando en claro que si la prisión necesita contener diez mil prisioneros, la expansión es fácilmente manejable. Luego, que México anuncie una exportación mucho más rápida de delincuentes de drogas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 12:45 ay, no mames, guey!
      Tan grandote, tan viejonote y tan pinchi mandilon.
      For real efficient prisons, export them to Mexico and keep everybody happy all over the world, for half the price, of course, prison guard Mafias would not like that one bit, but there is the promise that more US prison guards would get pregnant from inmates, but in Mexico, inmates can't sue for getting raped by the female staff.

      Delete
  7. Fentanyl is very dangerous but these stupid people need to use it with caution and there wouldn't be so many ODs..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The problem is people cut things like heroin with it. Or they get those fake roxy’s that have zero quality control. One might have nothing in it, the next might have enough to kill 5 people. That’s why it’s hard even for people that are very aware to be safe.

      Delete
  8. Former Mexican police officers find a better job as drug trafficking mules, beautiful, that a pinche Neta worth knowing, real criminals must have got sick of getting paid with pinche maruchan and a plastic milk gallon life saver they can fill with river water to cross the mercas.
    Hope the striking Mexican mules keep it up until they get minimum wages and life Insurance, at least.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Cant help but sorry for this dude. 30 years in prison for 6k $. And that shit is worth Millions. You better have some state of the art mechanical compartment if youre taking a risk that big. Fuck that. When I used to traffic I just stuck to weed. I can handle some time. Not decades. Pobre compa chingo a su madre. I bet these fuckers lied to him to get him to confess, never say shit unless your lawyer is present.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. you are right, prepare for the worst and hope for the best...he just hoped...stupid move.

      Delete
    2. "I swear offisa' I don't have no idia where's that drugs come from
      must have been a conspiracy of my vieja and el Sancho"
      That is the shit that flies all the time.

      Delete
  10. Great Yanqui good catch, you see in US, they don't censor his name, nor do they mask his eyes black. But no in Mexico, they do that, even when thier convicted of a crime, faces are still covered.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cover faces until proven guilt, but when doing time.

      Delete
  11. Fenta sells for 30 thousand plus a kilo the more east it goes. 6 thousand for 30 keys? What a dumbass he deserved it, people get paid $1,000 per in my area. If he would of came here he could of risked it for 30 thousand not 6 lmaooooo

    ReplyDelete
  12. He could be free in a year. Just like the dudes Omar Alejandro Cantu Garcia, and David Guillermo Cantu Garcia that got busted in Ohio with 22 pounds of Fentanyl and other dope. Those guys are already back in Monterrey, Mexico. One of them was in politics so it sounds like there is a story there... Can we get a follow up on that story?

    ReplyDelete
  13. Fenta is manufactured/produced in Mexico, how come there’s literally no overdoses on the Mexican side? Maybe the US should spend millions on educating drug users instead of building for profit prisons. Oh wait there’s no profit in educating druggies, they rather boost revenue through incarceration. US is a joke

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 10:12 pos a guebo! Prison guards have Union, leaders, 401 k, GOOD PAY, early retirement, connections, and they vote to keep the funding coming, cushy jobs after retirement... Addicts have nothing but dirt and lice, even some from the best US families.

      Delete
    2. Well said 1:39

      Delete

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