Tuesday, February 12, 2019

El Chapo Trial: Government Press Release

Chivis Martinez for Borderland Beat

"As proven at trial, Guzman Loera was a principal leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, a Mexico-based international drug trafficking organization responsible for importing and distributing vast quantities of cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine and heroin in the United States. .."

Note: Chapo will stay in Manhattan until his sentencing on June 25th.  The sentence will be natural life, meaning he will leave in a pine box.  He will then be transferred to another prison.  Most likely ADX Florence Colorado, which is where most are predicting he will be sent. Below is press release from the Department of Justice--
Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of New York

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tuesday, February 12, 2019
Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, Sinaloa Cartel Leader, Convicted of Running a Continuing Criminal Enterprise and Other Drug-Related Charges

BROOKLYN, N.Y. – Joaquin Archivaldo Guzman Loera, known by various aliases, including “El Chapo” and “El Rapido,” was convicted today by a federal jury in Brooklyn of being a principal leader of a continuing criminal enterprise – the Mexican organized crime syndicate known as the Sinaloa Cartel – a charge that includes 26 drug-related violations and one murder conspiracy.  Guzman Loera was convicted of all 10 counts of the superseding indictment, including narcotics trafficking, using a firearm in furtherance of his drug crimes and participating in a money laundering conspiracy.  The verdict followed a 12-week trial before United States District Judge Brian M. Cogan. Guzman Loera faces a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment.

Matthew G. Whitaker, Acting Attorney General; Richard P. Donoghue, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York; Ariana Fajardo Orshan, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida; Brian A. Benczkowski, Assistant Attorney General of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division; Uttam Dhillon, Acting Administrator, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA); Christopher A. Wray, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); Kirstjen Nielsen, Secretary, United States Department of Homeland Security; Derek Benner, Executive Associate Director, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI); Bryan T. Mullee, Acting U.S. Marshal, Eastern District of New York; and James P. O’Neill, Commissioner, New York City Police Department, announced the verdict.

The Evidence at Trial

As proven at trial, Guzman Loera was a principal leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, a Mexico-based international drug trafficking organization responsible for importing and distributing vast quantities of cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine and heroin in the United States.  The evidence at trial, including testimony from 14 cooperating witnesses; narcotics seizures totaling over 130,000 kilograms of cocaine and heroin; weapons, including AK-47s and a rocket-propelled grenade launcher; ledgers; text messages; videos; photographs and intercepted recordings, detailed the drug trafficking activity of Guzman Loera and his co-conspirators over a 25-year period from January 1989 until December 2014.  Guzman Loera was repeatedly referred to by witnesses as one of the leaders of the Sinaloa Cartel.

Guzman Loera oversaw the smuggling of narcotics to wholesale distributors in New York, Miami, Atlanta, Chicago, Arizona, Los Angeles and elsewhere.  The billions of illicit dollars generated from drug sales in the United States were then clandestinely transported back to Mexico.  Guzman Loera used “sicarios,” or hit men, who carried out hundreds of acts of violence in Mexico to enforce Sinaloa’s control of territories and to eliminate those who posed a threat to the Sinaloa Cartel.

Drug Trafficking                    

In the course of the decades-long drug trafficking conspiracy, the Sinaloa Cartel transported tens of thousands of kilograms of narcotics from Central and South America for distribution in the United States.  Guzman Loera used various methods to transport the cartel’s narcotics into the United States, including submarines, carbon fiber airplanes, trains with secret compartments and transnational underground tunnels.  Multiple witnesses testified about seizures by law enforcement officers of massive amounts of cocaine, heroin and marijuana linked to the Sinaloa Cartel.  One of the largest seizures of drugs bound for the U.S. involved over seven tons of cocaine concealed in jalapeño cans.

The jury also heard recordings of Guzman Loera’s own damning words discussing his drug trafficking, corruption and violence.  calls included Guzman Loera discussing sending “ice,” meaning methamphetamine, to Ohio, Tucson, Minneapolis and Los Angeles.

Communications Network

Guzman Loera also utilized a sophisticated encrypted communications network to operate the global narcotics trafficking operation.  As an information technology engineer testified at trial, Guzman Loera paid him one million dollars to purchase and set up a network to enable the defendant to communicate via Internet with his drug-trafficking associates in Colombia, Ecuador, Canada and the United States without fear of being intercepted by law enforcement or his rivals.   The witness devised a secret and secure system, consisting of encrypted cell phones and encrypted apps.

Cartel Violence

The success of the Sinaloa Cartel relied upon the use of violence to maintain their power throughout the region and beyond.  Numerous co-conspirators testified that Guzman Loera directed his hitmen to kidnap, interrogate, torture and shoot members of rival drug organizations, at times carrying out acts of violence himself.  A former hitman testified that Guzman Loera beat two men with a tree branch until their bodies “were completely like rag dolls,” before shooting the men and ordering their bodies to be tossed into a bonfire.  The former hitman also testified that Guzman Loera interrogated a rival drug cartel member, shot him and ordered that he be buried alive.  In an intercepted call, the jury heard Guzman Loera order one of his sicarios to kidnap rival cartel members, but not to kill them without first checking with him.

Weapons

The Sinaloa Cartel had unfettered access to weapons.  A law enforcement witness showed the jury over 40 AK-47s that were seized in El Paso, Texas before they could be delivered to Guzman Loera in Mexico.  Additionally, witnesses identified photographs of various weapons, including grenades and a rocket-propelled grenade launcher utilized by the Sinaloa Cartel.  Guzman Loera’s personal arsenal included a gold plated AK-47 and three diamond-encrusted .38 caliber handguns, one emblazoned with his initials, “JGL.”

Corruption

The evidence presented at trial demonstrated that to further the interests of the Sinaloa Cartel, Guzman Loera and his organization took advantage of a vast network of corrupt government officials.  These officials ranged from local law enforcement officers, prison guards, state officials, high ranking members of the armed forces, as well as politicians.  These corrupt officials assisted Guzman Loera and his organization in exchange for millions of dollars’ worth of bribery payments.  For example, according to the testimony of several witnesses, in many instances, Guzman Loera and his workers were warned of pending law enforcement operations which allowed Guzman Loera to avoid capture on multiple occasions.  In other instances, Guzman Loera, through his employees, paid officials to turn a blind eye to trafficking activities in an effort to facilitate the shipment of drugs, weapons and bulk cash.

Money Laundering

Guzman Loera’s lucrative drug trafficking business generated billions of dollars in illicit proceeds.  Guzman Lorea used various methods to launder money including bulk cash smuggling from the United States to Mexico.  One of the largest seizures was of $1.26 million seized from hidden compartments in a truck driven by Guzman Loera’s brother in Arizona in 1989.  In addition to the bulk cash smuggling, Guzman Loera oversaw numerous shell companies, including a juice company and a fish flour company, to launder the cartel’s narcotics trafficking proceeds.

“I am pleased that the Department has brought Joaquin Guzman Loera (El Chapo) to justice by securing a conviction against this drug kingpin, who was a principal leader of the Sinaloa Cartel,” said Acting Attorney General Whitaker.  “As was clear to the jury, Guzman Loera’s massive, multi-billion dollar criminal enterprise was responsible for flooding the streets of the United States with hundreds of tons of cocaine, as well as enormous quantities of other dangerous drugs such as heroin and methamphetamine. The trial evidence also overwhelmingly showed that Guzman’s unceasing efforts to expand his cartel’s control and consolidate its power left a wake of corruption and violence in communities in both Mexico and the United States.  This case demonstrated the extraordinary reach of the U.S. government, our tenacity and commitment to pursuing kingpins like Guzman whom — if their power is unchecked — will, like Guzman, develop what for 25 years was an almost unstoppable capacity to move massive quantities of drugs into our country.  Guzman had the capital to absorb huge losses and run his enterprise with impunity; the enormous power to corrupt; and the capability to employ violence on a massive scale.  This case, and more importantly, this conviction serves as an irrefutable message to the kingpins that remain in Mexico, and those that aspire to be the next Chapo Guzman, that eventually you will be apprehended and prosecuted. Finally, this verdict demonstrates that the United States, working in close partnership with the Mexican government, will continue to bring all possible resources to bear in its fight against international drug traffickers and their violent organizations.”

“Guzman Loera’s bloody reign atop the Sinaloa Cartel has come to an end, and the myth that he could not be brought to justice has been laid to rest.  Today, Guzman Loera has been held accountable for the tons of illegal narcotics he trafficked for more than two decades, the murders he ordered and committed, and the billions of dollars he reaped while causing incalculable pain and suffering to those devastated by his drugs,” stated EDNY United States Attorney Donoghue.  “Today’s verdict is the culmination of the tireless work of countless brave members of law enforcement, here and abroad, and we congratulate them.  The Department of Justice is committed to eradicating criminal organizations that fuel America’s drug epidemic, and our mission will continue until it is completed.”

“The conviction of former Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquin Guzman Loera strips the power from a man who employed horrific acts of violence to infect communities, throughout the United States and abroad, with the venom of illicit drugs,” stated SDFL United States Attorney Fajardo Orshan.  “Today’s verdict is a reminder to all, that our international borders do not protect narco-traffickers and the cartels’ criminal enterprises from federal prosecution.  U.S. Attorney’s Offices across the nation stand united with our domestic and foreign law enforcement partners, as we continue our fight against transnational criminal organizations.”

“Today’s conviction of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman demonstrates the dedication and determination of the men and women of DEA to bring the world’s most dangerous and prolific drug trafficker to justice,” stated DEA Acting Administrator Dhillon. “Those who bring drugs and violence into the United States that destroy lives and communities will not be tolerated, nor evade our reach. The success of this case is a testament to the strength of our relationship with our Mexican counterparts. DEA will continue to pursue justice worldwide and protect Americans.”

“The reign of Joaquin Guzman Loera’s crime and violence has come to an end,” said FBI Director Christopher Wray.  “As leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, Guzman Loera carried out and directed acts of brazen violence as he oversaw the import and distribution of vast amounts of illegal drugs throughout the United States.  But today, through the steadfast determination and collective efforts of the FBI and our law enforcement partners both domestic and abroad, and due to our continuing partnership with the government of Mexico, justice has been served.”

“The guilty verdict against Joaquin Guzman Loera, one of the most violent and feared drug kingpins of our time, is a testament to the hard work and courage of America’s frontline law enforcement personnel, including ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations. They gathered substantial evidence over multiple investigations, which made his extradition to the United States and a successful prosecution possible,” stated United States Department of Homeland Security Secretary Nielsen.  “Today’s verdict sends an unmistakable message to transnational criminals: you cannot hide, you are not beyond our reach, and we will find you and bring you to face justice.  Like Guzman, you will suffer the consequences of your criminal behavior.  I applaud the brave men and women at DHS who helped make this conviction possible and thank our interagency and international partners for their exceptional work.”

“HSI is committed to using our unique border authority to target and dismantle transnational criminal organizations responsible for trafficking narcotics and bringing violence into the United States,” said HSI Executive Associate Director Benner.  “Through collaboration with local, federal and international law enforcement partners, HSI special agents were able to bring an end to Joaquin Guzman Loera’s criminal activities, and help ensure he was brought to justice.”

“The conviction of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman demonstrates what is possible when law enforcement works collectively and coordinates their efforts. The United States Marshals Service ensured the integrity of the judicial process in this case.  From providing safe and secure detention and transportation of the world’s most notorious drug kingpin to ensuring the anonymity of the jury, protecting the judge, attorneys, witnesses and the public, the Marshals Service proudly played its important role in the process,” said Acting U.S. Marshal Mullee of the Eastern District of New York.  “I would like to express my gratitude to all of our law enforcement partners who worked tirelessly in support of our mission.  They are the talented men and women of the New York City Police Department, Federal Protective Service, 24th Civil Support Team of the New York National Guard, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons. The U.S. Marshals take our responsibility of protecting the federal judicial process very seriously. We must anticipate and deter threats, while continuously developing and employing innovative protective tactics. We carry out these responsibilities with precision every day across the country. The successful prosecution of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman stands as a shining example of our mission.”

“Just over two years ago, we announced the arrival of this notorious drug kingpin on U.S. soil, where he would face American justice and finally answer for his many years of illegal behavior.  And today, I commend the members of the jury for their dedication to this important case, as well as the lawyers of the Eastern District and all of our domestic and foreign law-enforcement colleagues, who continue to be our great partners in so many efforts.  In close cooperation with members of the DEA, the FBI, the U.S. Marshals Service, Homeland Security Investigations, the New York State Police and more, NYPD detectives on the Drug Enforcement Task Force tirelessly investigated Mr. Guzman Loera’s criminal enterprise for years,” stated NYPD Commissioner O’Neill.  “Today’s guilty verdict shows that, collectively, we never shelve an unfinished case.  He operated a drug-trafficking network responsible for perpetuating a murderous, toxic scourge that forever altered lives, tore apart families and netted billions of dollars in illicit revenue.  I thank the investigators for their hard work, and I remind the people we serve that New York City and America will always stand with our colleagues around the world in the fight against any individual or criminal group that venerates illegal profit above all else.”

When sentenced by Judge Cogan, Guzman Loera faces a mandatory life sentence without the possibility of parole for leading a continuing criminal enterprise, and a sentence of up to life imprisonment on the seven remaining drug counts.  After the verdict, the government will seek a forfeiture money judgment for billions of dollars constituting the cartel’s illegal drug-trafficking proceeds.

The government’s case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Gina Parlovecchio, Andrea Goldbarg, Michael Robotti, Patricia Notopoulos and Hiral Mehta from the Eastern District of New York; Assistant U.S. Attorneys Adam Fels and Lynn Kirkpatrick from the Southern District of Florida; and Trial Attorneys Amanda Liskamm, Anthony Nardozzi, Michael Lang and Brett Reynolds of the U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section.

The case was investigated by the DEA, ICE and the FBI, in cooperation with Mexican, Ecuadorian, Netherlands, Dominican and Colombian law enforcement authorities.  Substantial assistance was provided by the U.S. Attorneys’ Offices in the Northern District of Illinois, the Western District of Texas, the Southern District of New York, the Southern District of California and the District of New Hampshire.  The Department of Justice Office of International Affairs also played an integral role in securing the extradition of Guzman Loera to the United States, in cooperation with authorities of the Mexican government, without which his extradition and prosecution would not have been possible.  The investigative efforts in this case were coordinated with the Department of Justice Special Operations Division, comprising agents, analysts and attorneys from the Criminal Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section, DEA New York, DEA Miami, FBI Washington Field Office, FBI New York Field Office, FBI Miami Field Office, ICE HSI New York, ICE HSI Nogales, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Marshals Service, Internal Revenue Service - Criminal Investigation, U.S. Bureau of Prisons, NYPD and New York State Police.

This case is the result of the ongoing efforts by the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF), a partnership that brings together the combined expertise and unique abilities of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies.  The principal mission of the OCDETF program is to identify, disrupt, dismantle and prosecute high level members of drug trafficking, weapons trafficking and money laundering organizations and enterprises.

78 comments:

  1. El Mayo nunca a pisado carcel, se la pasa ordenando el viejon. Aunque les arda alas jaliscas, Sinaloa sigue mandando. Ni alos tobillos nos llegan aunque pase 100 anos. Luego se nota, mencho anda recruitando cualquier muerto de hambre que se le atreviese.

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    1. Mayo se caga nadamas en escuchar el nombre "mencho" lol el patron de Sinaloa lol

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    2. El Chapo Isidro le parte en su madre al mencho.

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    3. Ay si el mayo le tiene miedo al violado.

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    4. No sé confundan cabrones, como que jaliscas? No confundan quien quién es quién porque ni Mencho ni sus tecatos son Jaliscienses, nomas porque usan el nombre pero ese es un pinche cartel Michoacano, todos quieren Jalisco, hasta los chinolas quieren regresar. Los michoacanos y chinolas se parten la madre entre ellos por nuestro estado no mamen

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    5. Bien dicho 9:34 la verdadera gente de jalisco se avergüenza de estas lacras que la mayoria ni son ni nunca van a ser jalicienses. Jalisco tiene cultura y estas basuras ni si quiera saben lo que es esa palabra.

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  2. Well there it is 🌾⛆🔥

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  3. Cartel De Sinaloa is still going strong ! EL Señor Ivan Archivaldo and Alfredo al mando! Gente Nueva Special Forces will always protect the CDS plazas and protect los menores.
    El Señor sold oranges with a 3rd grade education and became one of the most powerful men in the world!


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    1. You said he was gunna be set free yesterday...you are now irrelevant

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    2. So powerful that he will be all alone in ADX,how powerful huh?

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    3. 006 for president so he can give el señor a pardon
      #perdonalo

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  4. The "Fall guy" has fallen. Next...

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    1. That’s all he ever was...a puppet crash dummy.

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    2. Agreed hes a crash test dummy. Also i love how people still think mencho kidnapped his kids.

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  5. All the pink people are all happy thinking that there’s no more drugs coming in because they gave life to Chapo

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    1. Pink people????Whatever

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    2. Funny enough I haven’t heard anything from average white people. I tried tuning in to several English news networks and was unable to catch anything about Chapo aside from NBC. All I hear is Hispanics and a few blacks talking about Chapo.

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    3. It's on every news channel that matters in the US. The fake news still deny that cartels are a problem

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    4. I don't think its a matter of denying, it just a matter of not showing it down our throats. A summary at night would be just fine. Hispanic channels just go overboard with it--all day long.

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    5. Lol them pinks will flood tj once their supplyer is short a couple of grams

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  6. Convicted by jury of his own peers. 🤔 - Sol Prendido

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    1. Ya deja de escribir pendejadas compa.

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    2. 7:46 Todavía no nace el guey que me pueda parar. Hay me avisas cuando tengas los huevos muñeca. - Sol Prendido

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  7. He will be able to go in a line box.

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    1. I typed pine box, and somehow the word correct app, puts line box..lol.

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  8. finally...good riddance. fucking scumbag mass murdering dog

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    1. 1:39 relax tuff guy... come back say that when ur crazy fellow american sickos ex-marines stop shooting innocent people at schools,clubs churches etc...cant even get justice for ur own citizens but yet trying to set an example convicting foreigne drug lord....WHAT A JOKE THIS SYSTEM IS....

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    2. typical smh. Oh he did a crime but so and so did worse things blah blah blah. Many people who have committed mass murders have killed themselves in the act and those who haven’t are in jail. Isn’t that justice? None of them are roaming around free. If any is please let us know.
      Foreign or domestic, doesn’t matter

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    3. 5:03 if u really want justice then put usa n mexican politicians in handcuffs including presidents,governors,LEO,dea agents,dhs list goes on these are bigger criminals.Bring to trial the one in charge of the "fast n furious" operation that allowed 1000's of weapons into mexico that eventually were used to kill 10s of 1000s of people,after u do that then justice will b served...btw did u find out who killed biggie n tupac???....haha..

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    4. G.W.B. is roaming around after blowing up twin towers killing over 2k peeps no conviction no nothing but dummies like 5:03 believed all they said on tv n were pleased with the story of catching n killing osama vin laden BUT usa is so respectful of cultures n religions that they burned his body n threw it in the ocean as they do in his religion even after supposebly killing 1000s of americans.only dummies would beleive that

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    5. The saudis were 100% whos responsible for 9/11- and we just got to see how the usa reacted when saudi arabia killed that journalist- they did SHIT- All because theyre worried about losing an arms deal and they could lose a lot of $$$- the usa is PATHETIC- Almost all the politicians are dirty on some level- its a bunch of shit- and none of them ever spent a day in jail/prison

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    6. @6:35

      Osama bin laden was not killed and burned and thrown in the ocean. That MF was captured, tortured and is being held captive in a top secret location while his ass gets tortured everyday

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    7. @6:35

      Osama bin laden was not killed and burned and thrown in the ocean. That MF was captured, tortured and is being held captive in a top secret location while his ass gets tortured everyday

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  9. Today El Chapo reign is over lol ok but are the drugs still coming in there is and will be no drop off in drugs coming here and weapons going to Mexico this shit don't stop nor will it ever

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    1. Should we free all drug lords then?

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    2. no but we need a new strategy because the one we got ain't doing anything the war on drugs is a joke America had a chance in the early 2000s to legalize marijuana which at that was 70% of the cartels revenue but they didn't which in turn let the cartels get stronger and have the resources to make new drugs like Mexican meth now they don't care about legalization of marijuana because of meth and their new cash cow fentanyl

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    3. 4:12 I say any person who aids in money launder, prison guard, cop, or politician that aids in MX should get a mandatory life sentence (in solitary confinement if possible).

      In US same thing but if their aid resulted in the direct death of a third party they should get a mandatory death sentence

      MIGHT help!!!

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    4. Estos gringos/pochos son unos hipócritas. Lol nothing will change.

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  10. Nice rat collage and the rat hole they all crawled into...

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  11. The people that believe Chapo was Robin Hood miss the point. Chapo did more harm to the reputation of Mexico than any single person in Mexico's history. Robin Hood was a mythical friend of the poor at the expense of the rich. Guzman was a friend to himself who sold drugs to youth and killed innocents.
    He's Charles Manson or Ted Bundy on steroids, or should we say cocaine.

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    1. He sold drugs to anybody old young all walks of life killed innocents yes but a lot were drug cartel members. Why would the jury spend so much time going over the evidence and testimony to just convict him of all the chargers even the use of weapons when they were supplied by the USA fast and furious

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    2. Well said 2:03

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    3. 2:03 stfu u comparing a drug varon killing in the name of business like the u.s goverment does every day to a serial killer. Nice try now go take your meds or hit.

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    4. at 7:44....funny that you blame just the US gov. for that. Doesn't almost every gov. of every country do the same thing?? Ohh...that's right...Mexico's gov. looks the other way....i forgot. 2:03 is right...Chapo was not some robinhood figure. Farmers in Sinaloa benefited from his cartel using their land. People of Sinaloa got a free meal when he and his entourage walked into a restaurant...great! Other than that...what did this guy do? He looked for, created and found ways to get addictive substances across a border for money. And in the process...killed or ordered to kill anyone that got in the way of that money. Personally I do not blame these guys for making money off people that cant control themselves. But killing and torturing in the process isn't necessary and that sad thing is that these cartels don't get that...like you...they are morons.

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    5. 3:36 if only people like u stopped blaming anyone also for u not raising ur kids with good principals drug abuse would stop but ur too busy blaming a drug lord that u forget about ur family n as we speak theres tons of drugs crossing the border that will eventually end up being used by ur kids or family n it will never stop til good parents raise up

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    6. If only it was that simplistic 8:48---whereas I agree a strong family guidance is very important, many, many, many children turn to the dark side and drugs for reasons other than what you describe. Don't be so judgmental ad generalizing. It is complicated.

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    7. Agree with u chiva but we cant go day in n day out blaming traffickers for someone getting into drug addiction...not judging anybody but easiest thing for people to do is to throw someone also under the bus..n one thing we all agree in is that drugs will NEVER stop being supplied with chapo in or out...

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    8. i don't blame trafficker for someone making that choice.

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  12. Is there a loop hole throughout this where it can be appealed?

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    1. He can always appeal but with all the different counts in his indictment and convictions on those counts it is going to be really hard. His conviction will be affirmed after a review by a appellate court.

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  13. Oracle love our justice system at work, a fair and short trail.
    Mexico-Observer

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  14. Is there a possibility he can get anything less than life??

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  15. People think Mayo is going to be free forever but the same way they had chapo under there sights for soo many year that’s how thay have Mayo at the moment we’ll be seeing him with chapo soon

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    1. I don't believe El Mayo will be caught. El Mayo is more powerful than Chapo although some on here might disagree. Remember he had the DEA call his son while his son was in custody. Something so simple but it is not that simple. It is a move made by a powerful Narco who has sold drugs for over 50 years and has never been arrested and can be compared to heroin King Lo Hsing Han in that respect. El Mayo is CIA and has to keep the show going.

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    2. Chapo’s lawyer said he thinks the us and Mexico leave Mayo alone bc they need someone to keep the drug world under control . He did an interview I think yesterday or the day before.

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  16. Is it true that VZ will be sentenced this month? I say he’ll get 15 max. Probably get out at 12.

    Someone on Twitter was speculating he might get 10 1/2 years to get out later this year or next year if US govt doesn’t count the (almost a) year he was jailed in MX

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    1. He getting less then ten he’s been in jail over 10 years and they gave him a good deal to testify against el chapo

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    2. 5:08 lucky him. i hope he stays out of trouble this time

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    3. Yes it is true--i reported on this at first he was to be sentenced before his testimony but then the gov changed it until after the trial...he mentioned it in his testimony, that everything depended on how he did in testimony. BTW he was telling the truth about going to his father and wanting out of the family business. I heard it from two sources who would know. that means chapo knew. i don't think there was any animosity between the two men.

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    4. I am glad he wanted to get out before he was imprisoned. That means he might do well when he gets out. He still has time to start a whole new life with his wife and kids here in the US.

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    5. where do people get the idea that he is his fathers favorite

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  17. Con el chapo on sin el chapo la GUERRA à las drogas esta perdida !el c.d.s sigue mandando toneladas de cocaïna y otras drogas porque ESTADOs UNIDOS tiene milliones de ADICTOS nunca acabaran con las drogas i los carteles o si el dia que Sean TODAS las drogas legalizadas ! En el MUNDO nunca ubo tantas drogas différentes y siempre abra mas ADICTOS es sin fin !!!

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    1. Tienes razón que seguirá la lucha pero no va a parar si la legalizan, los carteles seguirán existiendo enfocándose en cosas prohibidas que dejen dinero, si no son las drogas será el robo de combustible o muchas otras cosas, Estados Unidos no es el único con muchos adictos, México se está convirtiendo de un país productor a un país consumidor, ahora los mismos carteles se pelean hasta por las esquinas, les venden a su propia gente y hasta les pagan con drogas. La legalización no acaba nada, el alcohol es legal y no sé a acabado el alcoholismo. Mexico y Estados Unidos se apuntan el dedo pero los dos están igual, es un ciclo, mientras haiga adictos en usa habrá gente en México que les venda droga, mientras en México se estén matando, habrá alguien en usa que les venda armas.

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    2. 953 knows what's up

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    3. 9:53....well said

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  18. Those zambadas guys did chapo dirty.

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  19. Poor Sapo I bet he feels betrayed by El Miado, EPN and soon by Emma

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  20. They had Emma all along . They had enough to send her to prison and she remained free . She was working with then to stay out of jail . Could have arrested her and put the twins in foster . Even after the evidence came out in court she kept coming back . That's tell tale there . Could have gotten to her when she came up to give birth . Maybe before . Odd she had no fear of being jailed in the US . Everybody else was cooperating . Why not her ?

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  21. I dont think his conviction will stop a single kilo coming from Mexico by the Sinaloa cartel. While he deserves this judgement, this is simply sticking a band aid on a bleeding arterial wound, all of the money, resources, and time spent on convicting him, could have been spent on coming up with an implementing a strategy to decrease the demand for these drugs by the USA populace, that in itself would do much more than imprisoning capos.

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    1. Otis welcome back, glad your car is working, I understand what you're saying...USA already sends millions per year to Mexico, to fight the war on drugs...and seems to only help a fraction, there is no simple cure, and you think the new president ALMO, is doing anything about it?
      Luna Apaghta

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    2. Otis!....good to see you comment. I agree...Chapo has been outta the game for 2+ yrs. Nothing has changed.

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    3. Hola Tia como has estado? bien ojala. Luna thanks for the welcome, AMLO is trying not to stir the pot too much at this point, his platitudes about forgiveness suggest a counter strategy to the people formally in his position. As far as his real intentions, I doubt very much behind the scenes he will want to do anything and stop that river of dirty money flowing into the politicians pockets from the cartels.

      It was interesting reading through Auntie Chivis posts during the trial about the alleged 100 million payment from Chapo to Pena Nieto, that did raise my eyebrow for a mili-second. But as you rightly state, USA is fighting the symptoms rather than the cause, and like a malignant cancer, not only are we seeing more deaths in Mexico during the PN regime than during the 2010 period, but fentanyl is causing more deaths on the streets of the USA.

      Drugs both legal and illegal are the biggest business on earth, and while the powerful lobbyists are urging the Govts to do nothing to interrupt their cash flow, the average man in the street is paying the real bill, death and dispair.

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  22. The US gov’t will speak in vague terms of “corrupted Mexican officials”, but as soon as allegations of specific acts of corruption by particular officials are made, the US likes to pull the “you’re on trial, not the Mexican gov’t” card. That sword should cut both ways.

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    Replies
    1. Truth is; American government officials know the corruption within Mexico's government. Despite the knowledge and evidence there is nothing US can do to officially arrest them.
      There laws forbids the removal or arrests of any government official.

      So as you can see pressure by US is all that can be given. In the end; its Mexican government who gets the last laugh.

      Truth

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