Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Justice, Treasury, and State Departments Coordinate efforts against CJNG

Chivis Martinez Borderland  Beat-from DOJ-DEA website

5M reward for "El 85" 10M reward for Mencho

El 85 and El Mencho

WASHINGTON – The United States of America, through its Departments of Justice, Treasury, and State announced today a series of measures to target and dismantle the Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generacion (CJNG) – one of the largest, most dangerous drug cartels currently operating in Mexico. These measures include the unsealing of 15 indictments, the State Department’s approval of large rewards, the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control designations, and the establishment of a citizen tip-line. 

CJNG is one of the most powerful cartels in Mexico and the Department of Justice considers it to be one of the five most dangerous transnational criminal organizations in the world, responsible for trafficking many tons of cocaine, methamphetamine and fentanyl-laced heroin into the United States, as well as for violence and significant loss of life in Mexico.
  
Background

CJNG has grown in size and strength rapidly since its inception. Today, the DEA estimates the CJNG exerts influence in 23 of 31 (75 percent) of Mexican states, including key drug production and transportation corridors. CJNG is a powerful drug cartel in Mexico as a result of the organization’s disciplined command and control, sophisticated money laundering techniques, efficient drug transportation routes, and extreme violence. The cartel has also expanded globally, with significant presence and illicit business not only throughout the United States and Mexico, but also Europe, Asia, and Australia.
“We will continue to hammer transnational criminal organizations like CJNG,” said Attorney General Sessions. “The DEA has said for three years in a row that Mexican drug cartels are the single gravest drug threat that this country faces. President Trump recognizes this, and the day I was sworn in as Attorney General, he ordered me to dismantle transnational criminal organizations, including the cartels. We have been faithful to that order. Today, I am announcing 15 indictments returned against the leaders of CJNG. These indictments are our next steps—but not our last. We will continue following President Trump’s order.”

“DEA has a strong partnership with the Government of Mexico that is demonstrated in the relentless pursuit of the violent leadership of the CJNG cartel,” said Acting Administrator Dhillon. “We will continue to work closely with our international partners to bring Nemesio Cervantes aka El Mencho to justice and dismantle drug cartels like CJNG.”



Unsealing of Indictments

Today, the Department of Justice Criminal Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section, U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Southern District of California, the Northern District of Illinois, the Southern District of Mississippi, and the Eastern District of Virginia are announcing 15 indictments, some recently unsealed, against the following CJNG leaders, financiers, transporters, and sources of drug supply:

Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes, aka “Mencho”: Oseguera Cervantes, 52, is the lead defendant in a three-count superseding indictment returned in the District of Columbia in 2017 alleging that he is the leader of a Continuing Criminal Enterprise, conspired to distribute significant quantities of narcotics for illegal importation into the United States, and has used a firearm during and in relation to these drug trafficking crimes. In addition to the indictment in the District of Columbia, Oseguera Cervantes has also been charged with drug trafficking offenses in the Southern District of Mississippi. He is currently a fugitive and was designated as a “Kingpin” under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act by the Department of the Treasury in April 2015.

Ruben Oseguera Gonzalez, aka, “Menchito”: Oseguera Gonzalez, 28, Oseguera Cervantes’ son, served as the CJNG’s second in command until the time of his arrest by Mexican authorities in June 2015. Oseguera Gonzalez is charged in a two-count indictment returned in the District of Columbia in 2017 alleging that between 2007 and February 2017, Oseguera Gonzalez engaged a conspiracy to distribute significant quantities of narcotics for illegal importation into the United States and that Oseguera Gonzalez engaged in the use of a firearm during and in relation to one or more drug trafficking crimes. Oseguera Gonzalez remains in Mexican custody and is currently pending extradition to the United States.

Abigael Gonzalez Valencia: Gonzalez Valencia, 45, the head of the “Cuinis” organization, is charged in a three-count indictment returned in the District of Columbia in 2014 alleging that he was a leader in a Continuing Criminal Enterprise, conspired to distribute significant quantities of narcotics for illegal importation into the United States, and used a firearm during and in relation to one or more drug trafficking crimes. The CJNG has flourished in significant part because of its close affiliation with the Cuinis organization, which is the primary financial support network of the CJNG drug trafficking efforts. The Cuinis organization is composed of multiple members of the Gonzalez Valencia family. The relationship between the Cuinis organization and the CJNG is cemented through both intertwined drug trafficking and money laundering dealings as well as familial relationships, including the marriage of one member of the Gonzalez Valencia family to CJNG leader Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes. Gonzalez Valencia was designated as a “Kingpin” under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act by the Department of the Treasury in April 2015. Gonzalez Valencia was arrested by Mexican authorities in February 2015 pursuant to his charges in the United States and is awaiting extradition.

Jesus Contreras Arceo, aka “Canasto”:  Contreras Arceo, 41, is charged in a two-count indictment returned in the Eastern District of Virginia in 2017 alleging that between 2011 until March 2017, Contreras Arceo engaged in a conspiracy to distribute significant quantities of narcotics for illegal importation into the United States and that Contreras Arceo engaged in a conspiracy to commit money laundering. Contreras Arceo was arrested by Mexican authorities in July 2018 pursuant to his charges in the United States and is awaiting extradition.

Erick Valencia Salazar, aka “El 85”: Valencia Salazar, 41, is charged in a one-count indictment returned in the District of Columbia in 2018 alleging that between 2003 until August 2018, Valencia Salazar engaged in a conspiracy to distribute significant quantities of narcotics for illegal importation into the United States. Valencia Salazar is currently a fugitive and is believed to be in Mexico.

Juan Perez-Vargas, aka, “Piolin”: Perez-Vargas, 37, is charged in a two-count indictment returned in the Southern District of California in 2017 alleging that Perez-Vargas engaged in a conspiracy to distribute significant quantities of narcotics for illegal importation into the United States. Perez-Vargas was arrested by Mexican authorities in September 2017 pursuant to his charges in the United States and is awaiting extradition.

Diego Pineda Sanchez, aka “Botas” and Carlos Parra-Pedroza: Pineda Sanchez, 33, and Parra-Pedroza, 35, are charged with 28 others in a 63-count indictment returned in the Northern District of Illinois in 2015, alleging that between 2011 and September 2014, Pineda Sanchez and Parra-Pedroza led a Mexico-based conspiracy to launder more than $100 million in narcotics proceeds belonging to Mexico-based drug traffickers, through the purchase and resale of gold. The evidence in the case established that Pineda Sanchez and Parra-Pedroza laundered most of these narcotics proceeds on behalf of CJNG and its leader, Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes aka “Mencho.” Pineda Sanchez and Parra-Pedroza have pleaded guilty to the money laundering conspiracy charges, and are facing a statutory maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. On Oct. 5, Pineda Sanchez was sentenced to serve 15 years in prison by the U.S. District Court in Chicago. The Court will set a sentencing date for Parra-Pedroza at a status hearing on Nov. 1. All other charged and arrested members of the conspiracy have pleaded guilty and have either been sentenced or are awaiting sentencing.

The following individuals linked to the CJNG have also been indicted as a result of the coordinated efforts against the cartel:

Oswaldo de Jesus Miramontes-Diaz, 44, was charged in the Central District of California in 2015. Miramontes-Diaz is currently serving a sentence pursuant to the charges in the United States;

Gerardo Gonzalez Valencia, aka, “Lalo,” 41, was charged in the District of Columbia in 2016. He was arrested by Uruguayan authorities in April 2016 on these charges, and is awaiting extradition;

Jose Gonzalez Valencia, aka, “Chepa,” 42, was charged in the District of Columbia in 2016. He was arrested by Brazilian authorities in December 2017 on these charges, and is awaiting extradition;

Ulises Yovany Mora-Tapia, aka, “Yiyo,” 33, was charged in the District of Columbia in 2016. Mora-Tapia is currently a fugitive and is believed to be in Mexico;

Jorge Manuel Cobian-Gonzalez, 43, was charged in the Eastern District of Virginia in 2017. Cobian-Gonzalez is currently awaiting trial;

Juan Manuel Abouzaid El Bayeh aka, “El Escorpion,” 45, was charged in the District of Columbia in 2017. Abouzaid El Bayeh is currently a fugitive and is believed to be in Mexico; 

and Alfredo Galindo-Salazar aka, “Tucan,” 47, was charged in the District of Columbia in 2018. Galindo-Salazar is currently a fugitive and is believed to be in Mexico.

Treasury OFAC Designations

Since April 2015, OFAC has announced nine designation actions totaling 63 separate individuals and entities in Mexico tied to the CJNG and the Cuinis organization.

In the initial 2015 designation action, both Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes and Abigael Gonzalez Valencia were designated by OFAC as Specially Designated Narcotics Traffickers under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. These Kingpin Act designation actions targeting the CJNG and the Cuinis organization are among the most aggressive and targeted in OFAC’s history against Mexican drug trafficking organizations. Based upon this series of OFAC designations, Mexican authorities were able to seize the Hotelito Desconocido, an exclusive boutique hotel on the Pacific coast of Mexico, which was controlled by members of Los Cuinis organization. OFAC designations have allowed U.S. and Mexican government officials to follow the money of the CJNG and the Cuinis organization in an effort to disrupt their money laundering activities.

“Treasury has strategically targeted leaders of CJNG and the Cuinis organizations, as well as complicit family members, criminal operatives, and businesses under their control,” said OFAC Director Gacki. “Our goal is to disrupt the cartels’ finances, which are overwhelmingly generated from drug sales that occur in the United States, and deny them access to the U.S. financial system. OFAC is committed to working with the Department of Justice and Mexican counterparts in order to apply economic pressure on CJNG and the Cuinis organizations until they are effectively dismantled.”

State Department Award and DEA Tip-Line

As part of continuing efforts to cripple the operations of the CJNG, the U.S. Department of State has previously issued a number of rewards through the Narcotics Rewards Program for information leading to the arrest of critical CJNG operatives. Previously, the Department of State issued rewards through the Narcotics Rewards Program for up to the amount of $5 million for information leading to the arrests of Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes, Abigael Gonzalez Valencia, and Jose Gonzalez Valencia.
Effective immediately, the Department of State is announcing an increase to the Narcotics Rewards Program reward for information leading to the arrest:

 Of the leader of the CJNG, Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes aka, “El Mencho.” Now $10 million, the reward is one of the largest ever approved for the Narcotics Rewards Program.
Additionally, the Department of State is announcing a Narcotics Rewards Program reward for information leading to the arrest of high ranking CJNG member Erick Valencia Salazar, aka, “El 85,” in the amount of $5 million. Individuals with information about this organization should contact law enforcement authorities by calling 1-213-237-9990, via email at MENCHOTIPS@usdoj.gov, or via Twitter by contacting the handle, @DEALosAngeles.

“The $10 million reward for information leading to the arrest of “El Mencho” is among the highest the Narcotics Rewards Program currently offers,” said Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Madison. “This reflects the U.S. government’s strong commitment to bringing Oseguera Cervantes to justice.”

Acknowledgments

These cases are the result of the ongoing efforts by the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces, and were significantly aided by coordination and support from the multi-agency Special Operations Division near Washington, D.C. OCDETF is a partnership that brings together the combined expertise and unique abilities of federal, state, and local enforcement agencies. The principal mission of the OCDETF program is to identify, disrupt, dismantle and prosecute high-level members of drug trafficking, weapons trafficking, and money laundering organizations and enterprises.

These cases are being prosecuted by the Criminal Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section in conjunction with DEA Los Angeles Field Division, DEA Mexico City, DEA Guadalajara, DEA Chicago, FBI New York, FBI’s Legal Attaché Office in Mexico City, Homeland Security Investigations Chicago and HSI Riverside; the Southern District of California in conjunction with DEA San Diego, DEA Guadalajara and HSI San Ysidro; the Northern District of Illinois in conjunction with the IRS-CI Chicago; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Chicago and HSI Chicago; the SDMS in conjunction with DEA Gulfport and the Eastern District of Virginia in conjunction with the DEA Bilateral Investigations Unit.          

The United States would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of the Government of Mexico in their bilateral efforts to target and dismantle the CJNG. The daily coordination between the Government of Mexico with the U.S. Department of Justice, Treasury and State to target this violent drug cartel has a direct impact on the lives and livelihood of millions of citizens in the United States and Mexico.

44 comments:

  1. damn this right here is proof these guys have been warring heavy against other cartels and the mexican military look how desperate the dea is since they probably never got their cut all these years these guys have been influencing the region by force, its time to take him out smh shows you how corrupt our govt is also. we havent forgot the cia flooded southern cali with coke during freeway ricky ross's days

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    Replies
    1. Your a clown. The desperation is Mexico’s government begging the USA to stop the murders and bloodshed that they cannot. Wake up pendejo.

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    2. Who ever runs the C.I.A runs the show.

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    3. Exactly. My theory is that Mencho is just the fall guy. He may already be dead for all we know. It’s a cat and mouse game. Much like Osama Bin Ladin.The CIA knows EXACTLY where Mencho is but doesn’t want to “find” him just yet. It’s so obvious that the CIA is what helped create CJNG and helped them spread worldwide. Chaos is good for business. Just look at the Middle East. No criminal organization gets that big without special intelligence agencies getting a huge cut of the $$$

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    4. Sounds good 187. I'm pretty sure the nation wide heroine epidemic has more to do with these indictments than anything else. You conspiracy theorists are silly. Must be exciting in ur little world...

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    5. What ya day Guzzi, ya homes, ya talking giberish.

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    6. Sometimes thinking you know more than you do is harmful. Case in point!

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    7. Just like all the other big cartels have done in the past...lol this is nothing new you must be new to BB tho thats for sure.

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    8. james jonesOctober 17, 2018 at 3:41 AM
      You sound like an up incoming lawyer. Chapo too is just "the fall guy".

      Delete
  2. Para todo la mangoes en el mundo,,estoy nunca cambio lugares con “el mencho”, igual todo el te de chino,,igual de no pats amore o plata,,igual todo de vodka en Russia,,igualito todo de dorado en ft.knox... my bookie is taking bets on how long mencho has left.. 1 mes 5-1,,6 meses 8-1,, 1 ano 10-1 etc...alguna adivinares Aca en bb,, mas cercita es una fecha con la hija de mencho

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  3. El 85 was just in jail not even a year ago now there is a 5 million bounty?????

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    Replies
    1. There wouldn't of been a reward if Mexican authorities did their job.

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  4. Adivinar de moo es,, mencho sin pagar Los personas de tienes poder behind the curtains.. o de violencia con la fuerzas armadas, y innocentes tambien.. mencho = icarus,, too high too fast,, unlike mayo who rose over time with minimal attention and violence.. esta Nuevo mundo ahora,, bastante rapido es rapido tumba

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  5. By far the most significant comment I’ve ever read by usdoj,,targeting this violent drug cartel that has a direct daily impact on millions of people’s lives on both sides of the wall.. in comparison the number of Fortune 500 companies that have started in the last 10 years similar to cjng,, draft kings worth 1.2 billion,,Oscar(health insurance) 1.7 billion,,honest company(Jessica Alba ) 1.7 billion,,instacart 2 billion,,lyft 2.5 billion,,wish3 billion,, Snapchat 16 billion... entonces what’s Cjng worth,, and how much do they make yearly in their sangre mojado plata

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  6. Cjng announced there entry into Durango and a new cell called cartel Durango Nueva Generación

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  7. Chivis thanks for posting. Would appreciate your thoughts, also from the other BB reporters Yaqui, Otis, Char, Profe, etc. - what does it all mean? What has changed from a month ago to now?

    Is this mostly PR media circus stuff or is there really a big shift in strategies, tactics, etc.?

    Who wins, loses, draws?

    Will AMLO support the US or go another way?

    If Mencho goes down in Mexico, will he be extradited?

    Etc.

    Thanks as always for all your contributions to BB.

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  8. Who is in the batter's box in the line-up for succession? The DEA would need to take down the next three levels in order to break the chain and neuter the cartel. These guys are like prairie dogs. One goes down, three pop up. What is needed is a mass ambush of a convoy of sicarios. 100 dead gunmen would make a much bigger impression on wanna-be assassins.

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  9. So the US charged HSBC a billion dollar fine for laundering money for the cartel, nobody goes to jail and now put a 10 Million dollar bounty on Mencho, the US is fucked up backwards...might as well let Mencho pay his "fine" and business continue. We all know what happens when leadership of cartels are captured, more violence, more death, more drug influx, and just another cycle of bullshit.

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    1. Exactly!
      Beautiful point of view to the reality of doing business here in the US.

      That's America for you.
      Eager to criticize and condemn other unsavory practices by others than ones one.

      Well said.
      US should practice what they preach!
      E42

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    2. Thats Mexico for you

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    3. 8:40
      How is that Mexico when it's the U.S doing the charges? Do you know which country is which?

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    4. Yup, that's the USA for you.

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  10. https://www.google.com/amp/s/m.abcnoticias.mx/amp/crece-recompensa-por-el-mencho-a-10-mdd/117534

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  11. El Mencho looks diff to other pic of him put on weight in face.

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  12. You blind to the bodies they been dropping then

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  13. So the US charged HSBC a billion dollar fine for laundering money for the cartel, nobody goes to jail and now put a 10 Million dollar bounty on Mencho, the US is fucked up backwards...might as well let Mencho pay his "fine" and business continue. We all know what happens when leadership of cartels are captured, more violence, more death, more drug influx, and just another cycle of bullshit.

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  14. Cross ma finguhs these cat gets caught befoh thanksgiving cuh. He done did too much damage. Naw meen. Oright oright.

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    Replies
    1. Eres chango o cholo?

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    2. 9:39 sounds like a "wanna-b cholo" trying to be a monkey haha

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    3. Pinches racistas y luego se quejan de que no los quieren los gringos dan risa

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    4. Dam cuh am pretty shurr Nan of ya wud dare say that to a black person. Am mexican but careless wut u dumb people think.. but yeah u folks rasist as hell doe.

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    5. Not racsist at all buddy. I dont care what u are. You still sound like a retard. But by all means do ur thang smh

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    6. I’m pretty sure I lost brain cells trying to read this.

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  15. I’m sure they’ll get info on his whereabouts real fast because that is a lot of money but catching him depends on the Mexican side.

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  16. damn Sinaloa really paying the GOV to finish this cartel ~@~

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  17. Orale USA has been developing Intel. on these lowlifes roaches. Time to pay the Piper.

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  18. So the DEA has a strong relationship with Mexico's government?
    Come on really?
    The US has yet to curb the drug trade due to corruption by Mexican government. Moreover, with reliable intelligence from Mexico.
    All smoke and mirrors my friend.
    If the statement given by US authorities were to be true? An award for outstanding performance and achievement should be presented to Mexico!
    Now this is truly FAKE NEWS.
    Correction: ALTERNATIVE FACTS.


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    Replies
    1. "These cases are the result of the ongoing efforts by the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces, and were significantly aided by coordination and support from the multi-agency Special Operations Division near Washington, D.C."

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    2. Enrique Camarena
      Jaime Zapata
      2012 CIA Cuernavaca ambush
      Andrew Hogan

      You do forget that the US intelligence community and other agencies such as the DEA have been legally operating in Mexico along Mexican troops and agents right? Andrew Hogan was there dressed I'm Mexican fatigues when Chapo was captured, and when it comes to Mexico cooperating, the UNOPES, Murciélagos Negros, an elite force of Mexican Marines are trained in the US by USMC Raiders and they're the ones responsible for high profile arrests. And not to mention any covert ops done by the US inside Mexico without Mexicos permission or even knowing, they can track down these guys with Mexico's help as well without their help.



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  19. Replies
    1. Who? Mayo! Mayo is in the hills hiding and pushing half of what Mencho is doing. And thats a good thing. Mencho letting him live in peace!

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  20. @hitmn187
    That name says it all. I am sure you will have even more "insight" next month... You know, when the next season of Narcos is released.

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  21. here we go again with those mencho the fallguy? the cia are backing sinaloa if u believe that your fucking retarded

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  22. Must suck when you have to run and hide all your life. Rest in peace Mencho. Being a narco isnt worth it anymore

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