Monday, September 10, 2018

Narcos Control Chihuahua's Sierra

Translated by Yaqui for Borderland Beat from: El Heraldo

                                                   Sierra Tarahumara, Chihuahua
By: Ricardo Holguín

The wood that illegal groups steal or cut clandestinely from the mountains of the State of Chihuahua, identified as the Juarez Cartel through "La Línea" and the Sinaloa Cartel through "Gente Nueva", is marketed in different small and large businesses in the furniture industry, mainly in municipalities such as Parral, Delicias, Chihuahua, Madera and Guerrero.

According to some of the owners of sawmills in the most dangerous areas for timber trade in the state, such as Uruachi, Bocoyna and surroundings, organized crime criminals sell stolen or felled wood at affordable costs to different businesses, which for this reason they are forced to acquire it.

For security reasons, having sawmills in operation in the Sierra Tarahumara, the merchant decided to remain anonymous and explained that there is a quota for some workers who want to enter the business, which has triggered the dispute over the control of wood in the mill, as has happened in recent days.



A family is in charge of the control of drug trafficking and all its sub-activities, identified as "Manjarrez Alonso", known as "Los H's", who have the domain of wood theft, fuel, narcotics and different activities,  are practically the owners of most of the mountain businesses in Chihuahua.

At the service of the Sinaloa Cartel, the head of the plaza is César Daniel, known for his love of horses and outdoor activities and is nicknamed "El H2", leader of the group and its main operators are his brothers Homero Manjarrez Alonso, "El H7" and José Alfredo, "El Harry".

This criminal group is credited with the theft of wood on the roads that lead to Bocoyna, Uruachi, Guerrero and other parts of the sierra, where its extensive criminal structure seizes the examples of the sierra to carry out its business, which seems to leave more income than the sale of drugs in the mountainous area.


The owner of the sawmill explains that the population has fully identified "El H-2" as the person responsible for the violence in the place, because nobody can do anything against him, since there is not even a department to file a complaint and in the only ones offices that exist tell them that they should go to the state capital.

With the lack of opportunities to present a formal complaint and with the delay that could be a process of investigation against a criminal leader in charge of the wood business, those affected and citizens who know the subjects, decide to remain silent and prefer to continue with your daily life.


He mentions that the security in the place is scarce, because in addition to being very extensive, the necessary elements do not exist to cover or take care of the most conflictive municipalities that currently go through the theft and felling of trees in the mountain area in order to generate more income illegally.

For its part, the Federal Office of Environmental Protection (Profepa), has not made any research folder against elements of organized crime for issues related to illegal logging or wood theft in the mountain municipalities of the state, but instead has insured mainly wood charcoal

Similarly, the State Security Commission (CES) is responsible for highlighting agents in the area, but only people without logging permits and trucks that move wood have been arrested without determining their legitimate origin, which is not related to the structures of the organized crime groups.

The state security commissioner, Óscar Aparicio Avendaño, said that 14 individuals related to illegal clandestine logging in the western zone have been arrested, but none of them belongs to or is said to belong to an organized crime group, who allegedly lead this market from the felling until the sale.

Illegal logging is a crime against natural resources that leaves a significant number of profits, which is currently exploited by organized crime in Chihuahua and in what is known as the "Golden Triangle", where the main drug cartels operate in the north of the country.

Many mining interests are also held hostage by DTO's operating in the area. Stay tuned.

30 comments:

  1. Enforce the death penalty and let the people right to keep and bear arms.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More guns are the last thing Mexico needs, except in organized autodefensas, and even then half the time they turn into a cartel of their own.

      Delete
    2. 931 keep dreaming, they (government of Mexico) don't want a fix whatsoever, as long as curruption and crime continues
      The crimes will continue.

      Delete
  2. Thats interesting that there is no soilder deployment there. Life must be hell for us regular folks whose life is affected by groups of criminals.

    ReplyDelete
  3. H2 used to live in Cuauhtémoc. Went by the name El Hummer. Owned a few boot stores.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. An exgirlfriend of mine worked for Banorte in Cuauhtemoc and she would tell me that 100% of all boot stores in downtown cuautemoch were owned by narcos.. she said just sit around and watch how many ppl buy boots on a daily basis and hey they operate every single day and make HUGE cash deposits that soon get transferred to foreign accounts a lot of them not surprisingly were HSBC stock market accounts

      Delete
  4. CDS is for the people they say. They only dedicate themselves to drug trafficking, nothing else.
    B.S.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Times are different. Everyone was afraid of El Senor, now that hes in USA its a free for all.

      Delete
    2. Cds has been displacing and killing thousands of innocent people every place they go. Specially chihuahuas Sierra, those indigenous people need to be like the ones 8n michoacan and kick out the cartels out their towns, but unfortunately it's the other way around.

      Delete
    3. The ones in Michoacan where funded by cjng

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    4. Not the indigenous group, there was one small town that was working with CT but the original autodefenza didn't allow those people into their town either. The autodefenza from el papa smurf and el Americano were funded by cjng but not that one. They don't even let the government in either

      Delete
  5. And yes, there will be a significant number of individuals that actually deeply love to wager on the game.
    * Deposit Bonus: These online sportsbook provides you
    with a first deposit bonus approximately twenty percent if you do some initial
    deposit. But the cotton industry seemed Detroit from nineteenth century, and after that their uneconomical conditions ordered these phones diving
    sponges.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It’s beautiful up there & the government is just letting these money hungry leaches destroy the environment.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The author of the article appears to insinuate that the 5th picture is an area that has been robbed of its wood when it is actually the scene of a forest fire. Was just wondering if anyone else noticed.
    ~Ste D~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YES, I know that. However, I looked at MANY fotos, I believe this was logged and burned , not necessarily in that order.
      Happens all the time.

      Delete
    2. Also mentioned charcoal at end of article? Maybe photo reference idk?

      Delete
  8. Idk if they got it mixed up, but those guys are said to be Loyal to the Carrillos not CDS. H2 is the one whos group ambushed the police.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Chivis, I know you're always looking for new books on narco violence in Mexico.

    "Admitting the book was inspired by his own experience of working as a journalist in Mexico, MacGabhann said he was compelled to write his story when, just two blocks from his house, five people were brutally murdered."

    https://www.thebookseller.com/news/gritty-crime-debut-set-mexico-wn-858301

    ReplyDelete
    Replies

    1. have you read it? I am tempted to buy it. Me and MacGabhann have something in common. balacera's and dead people. of my two close ones, one was IN my office garden and parking lot. I had a fence built with iron gates but that did not stop zetas vs marina. 3 blocks away, the security chief body left with an icepick in his heart and a narco message. he was 35. the other was a shootout that went passed my office leaving bullet casings and by the school, 2 moms waiting for kids were shot, one died.

      I always tell people chances of being hurt even in violent places are almost non existent, but "SEEING" something may happen. I saw my first dead body close to my favorite restaurant. I could never eat there again because i would think of what it looked like.

      how about you?

      Delete
    2. That's where your old office was
      We know where you are now
      How's the wildfires in Cali
      006

      Delete
    3. I think the book is not out yet. Kinda embarrassed to say that in 14 years living in Morelia, Michoacán, I've never seen or heard a balacera or a dead body. What a wimp, right? I was in bed about a half mile away from the grenade attack ten years ago.

      Delete
    4. I prob will buy it. as for no dead bodies... probably of you were in "Tepeque" or others you would have. When I set up shop in coahuila it was CDG running the state and z's were there of course as their enforcer group. so violence went crazy later in 09 or 10 after the split. THEN the place went nuts. so in certain cites narco violence was everyday. you would not see it everyday, but one didn't have to look far. in my main city when the chief was killed, Z' went on a rampage settling scores, warehouses, businesses and homes were up in flames and the fire bomberos were warned not to extinguish the fires. there was a huge candy company/warehouse where i always bought bags of candy for events, that was burned to the ground and the chief's body dumped in the parking lot. the candy owners daughter was kidnapped. then coming back from MTY on the 57 i was approaching the worse event ever...Allende. chaos everywhere, we turned around. and went the VERY long way up and across texas south border an back into mexico. those fires lasted days yet it stopped no one from travelling around like into PN. crazy stuff and with the citizens it was business as usual. they laughed at my trepidation.

      but it all settled own eventually. back to knowing stuff was happening but saw little to nothing.

      Delete
    5. 5:47 yep just as i said. We found it an unnecessary waste of money to keep expensive offices, most of the crew work out of home offices. I think there is another fire up in norcal but it is a regular thing now sadly year round.

      Delete
  10. Isn't "Los H's" from Ncdj and not cds

    ReplyDelete
  11. Manjarrez Alonso, "El H2" is from the Juarez Cartel!

    ReplyDelete
  12. So the narcos control oil and gas, timber and wood products, mining. What's next? A chain of narco run convenience stores? Narco game shows on TV? Narco run daycare?

    They better start treating this thing like a conventional war and elicit the help of the US government and go all out, else they will just take over everything.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes...that and more. How do you think they launder money? Diversification into legitimate businesses as fronts to funnel money into and then back out of to be made to look legitimately earned. Pull the the drug money out of some markets, industries, or regions and both even the good folks suffer

      Delete
  13. deforestation hits you right in the feels. in higher elevations like the sierra madre, it takes a tree a lot longer to grow due to the low levels of oxygen. some of these trees are right on the tree line so they're even more sensitive, any logging can set the forest back several decades.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Visited Yecora last winter. I am a gringo. About 11pm on a Saturday night truck drives by with music blaring a narcorido. "Listen to me sing now, because tomorrow I am dead". In the back country saw single armed individual near the village school CuernosDeChivo. Locals said everything quiet as only one groupo malo,...

    ReplyDelete
  15. WHo contolls the cells in la sierra de Durango near Tepehuanes

    ReplyDelete

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