Wednesday, September 26, 2018

How a Brooklyn Gang May Have Gotten Crazy Rich Dealing for El Chapo

Chivis Martinez Borderland Beat republished from Vice

Experts suspect the Sinaloa Cartel of supplying heroin to Bushwick Crew, a flashy street gang cops say lived hard, fast, and deadly.

On March 15, 2016, Maurice Brown, an alleged member of the Brooklyn-based Bushwick Crew, posted a photo of himself on his Instagram account holding stacks of cash inside a strip club. He added a hashtag that read, “CHAPODABOSS,” apparently referring to Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán Loera, the longtime leader of Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel whose high-profile trial is set to begin this November in the very same borough Brown's crew was said (by police) to be based.

Brown's post was among 40 pages of exhibits federal prosecutors included in a superseding racketeering indictment against him and four other alleged members of Bushwick Crew earlier this month. The feds described the group as a violent street gang that flooded New York City with heroin and fentanyl and even executed rivals in cold blood during a roughly seven-year period ending in 2017.
While prosecutors and law enforcement have declined so far to identify Bushwick Crew's drug source, organized crime experts told VICE the gang appeared to have ties to Guzman’s Sinaloa Cartel, which they said continued to operate a highly efficient drug network from Los Angeles to New York City despite their leader's incarceration. The case against the gang pointed to the power of internationally notorious drug cartels to ensnare relatively young people in brutality across the world even after key leaders were incarcerated.

“Based on US maps produced by the US Drug Enforcement Administration showing where Mexican cartels operate and the timeframe the Bushwick Crew was distributing heroin, it is most likely Sinaloa that supplied them,” Nathan Jones, a security studies and criminal justice professor at Sam Houston State University in Texas, told me. “If you look at the maps, these guys were based in New York and moved heroin from Los Angeles and Chicago. That is primetime Sinaloa Cartel territory.”

Earlier this month, the five alleged Bushwick Crew members were arrested and held without bond. They "engaged in a large-scale heroin distribution conspiracy with international Mexican cartel connections that trafficked hundreds of kilograms of heroin into New York City,” according to a detention memo by US Attorney Richard Donoghue. They joined several other alleged gang members who were arrested and federally charged last summer as part of a two-year investigation.

The memo claimed the five recently-indicted alleged Bushwick Crew members—Brown, Jaquan Cooper, Lance Goodwin, Tyquan Griem and Norman Marrero—effectively served as enforcers who escorted drug traffickers, forcibly collected drug debts, and committed acts of violence against anyone who interfered with their operations or offended them. Among their gruesome alleged crimes: The 2013 torture and murder of Gary Lopez and Rudy Superville, two men cops said tried to rob one of the Bushwick Crew’s main heroin distributors. (Griem was not implicated in those murders, but was accused of murdering another man named Kelvin Johnson.)

According to court documents, Brown, Cooper, and Griem pleaded not guilty. Goodwin and Marrero were arrested in North Carolina and Pennsylvania, respectively, and ordered to be extradited back to Brooklyn. As of publication, they had not been arraigned nor entered formal pleas. Meanwhile, Steven Brounstein and Gary Cutler, attorneys for Brown and Cooper, declined comment. Griem's lawyer Samuel Gregory did not return a phone message and two emails seeking comment. Goodwin and Marrero were still waiting to have public defenders appointed to represent them in Brooklyn federal court.

Robert J. Bunker, an instructor with the University of Southern California’s Safe Communities Institute, specializes in transnational criminal organizations and global terrorist groups. He echoed Jones in his assessment of the Cartel most likely involved here. "The Los Angeles and Chicago distribution points are indeed linked to Sinaloa," he said in response to written questions. “Second, the crew distributed multi-kilo loads of heroin (and fentanyl) from January 2010—July 2017, which requires continuity of operations. Competing cartels to Sinaloa—such as the Beltran Leyva Organization and the Jalisco New Generation Cartel—have risen and fallen during that time span.”

Bunker argued Brown’s social media postings also offered anecdotal proof of the Bushwick-Sinaloa link. “Doing 'shout outs' to Chapo while working as a distributor for a competing cartel would both be ludicrous and a sign of disrespect that can easily get you killed in the drug-trafficking business,” he told me.
Sinaloa remained one of the most dominant drug-trafficking groups in the Western hemisphere in spite of infighting between factions and the arrest of other major leaders aside from El Chapo, according to a February Mexican cartel report by the global consulting firm Stratfor. “At the beginning of 2017, things did not look good for the Sinaloa cartel,” the report stated. “El Chapo's arrest and extradition left a vacuum in the Sinaloa cartel, which close associate Damaso Lopez Nunez (aka El Licenciado) tried to exploit to take control of the organization.”

However, the report went on to note that Lopez Nunez’s “insurrection (and organization) has been crushed and that it no longer poses a threat to the factions of the Sinaloa cartel headed by Ismael Zambada Garcia (aka El Mayo) and Guzman's sons, Alfredo Guzman Salazar and Ivan Archivaldo Salazar.”

Jones said the Bushwick Crew reminded him of the US drug distribution network run by Pedro and Margarito Flores, who became star witnesses against El Chapo and other Sinaloa Cartel leaders in a major drug-trafficking case out of Chicago. Their cooperation helped lead to the arrest of more than 50 people, of whom approximately 40 had been convicted by March 2015, according to the Chicago Tribune.

32 comments:

  1. Everybody Snitches, You almost have to know day's, because if you Don't the other Guy will. Then you will be left with the Banana in your ass instead of on the Table.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Emma don't have to worry none about money. Fron NY to LA, the people will supply her with whatever she wants-even Barbie birthday parties.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Stupid hoodrats making social media posts holding drug money without concealing their identity. These fools deserve to be brought down and back to reality.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tell that to 3:45pm,that clown talking about barbie doll parties😁😂

      Delete
    2. Agree! And they have already been replaced so the supply of drugs did not get interrupted.

      This cycle has been and will be repeated many times and never ever has or will the supply of drugs be interrupted.

      What kind of politics are behind you may ask, right'

      Delete
  4. It’s sad that people that don’t have shit and then they have a lot they start showing off like it will last for ever.

    Social media is the drug dealer’s worst enemy. When will they learn? Might as well email those pictures to the DEA instead

    M”

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dead on. They gotta "flex on the gram". Social media is just repulsive most of the time.

      Delete
  5. Fuckin dummies - did the feds work for them- bet they felt like gangstas posing on ig/fbook- real g's move in silence- #headassgang

    ReplyDelete
  6. Flashing stacks of cash like that online. That’s like asking to get yo dumbass robbed. Hey look at me. Look at all this $ I have. Who wants to come try me. This is one of the biggest reasons so many kdnappings go down. - Sol Prendido

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sol you see it's several stacks of dollar bills right?anybody can throw that around in the 🇺🇸

      Delete
    2. It all 1s.hes at a strip club.prolly 250bux at most

      Delete
  7. El Chapo out here ending racism and shit

    - El Jabali

    ReplyDelete
  8. And they went down just like the tha anthrax, all because of the love of attention

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A different group of ántrax still around

      Delete
    2. Yup traka still alive and active along with el camaron

      Delete
  9. Sinaloa is the real deal those pimps don't play i know a lot of other states from mexico love trow dirt at them but has we all know words are just words and them dudes sinaloas are action thats why they keep being on top respect and admiration to you guys from a black man

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't lie your from Sinaloa lol these groupies crack me up hahaha

      Delete
    2. 'All I wanna be is El Chapo, at least every street n$%&@ I know' Gucci Mane... could be these guys just giving up to chapo lol not directly involved with culichi tho?

      Delete
    3. Respect and admiration to all of the people that quietly work their asses off to take care of their families through an honest, hard working living.

      Delete
  10. Strip clubs are one of the first places you could get caught. Detectives go there and check who's throwing all the money at the stripers and busted!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Sinaloa and equal opportunity employer

    ReplyDelete
  12. He's holding up Dollar Bills! That's not gangsta money!

    ReplyDelete
  13. These guys make a lil chump change compared to guys like chapo and are too stupid to realize how low on the food chain in the dope game they are and are nothing more than cannon fodder for the mexican drug cartels!

    ReplyDelete
  14. New York is were the money is but selling heroin and crack is small time for this street gang, the real money is selling that powder

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are a few folks in NY that have gotten rich off H.

      Delete
  15. Chapothaboss , tf then every paisa in L.A wearing a 701 hat works for el chapo to?

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com