Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Death Penalty? SI!! How-- Lethal injection? Gas Chamber? Electric Chair? or PULIC HANGINGS?

Posted by DD for Borderland Beat

This is an article I wrote on May 23, 2012 and posted on BB Forum.  My intention was to discuss and maybe provide some answers to 2 questions that were frequently asked on the Forum and are still being asked in the comments today here on the Main Page of BB. 

(1) What type of human being can do these things to a fellow human being?

(2) What is the solution to stopping the violence in Mexico?


Those questions and a discussion of them are still relevant today. 

The solution that I proposed for stopping the violence in Mexico was definitely “thinking out of the box” and probably unthinkable in 2012.   Six years later, in 2018, it is still “thinking out of the box” but I am not so sure that it is “unthinkable”. 

Something like 87% of Mexicans expressed frustration with the corruption and violence in their country.  They are angry. 



Mexico is facing an election in barely over 2 months (July 1) that will be historic.  Going into those elections the candidates will face a public that less than 5% of the electorate believe democracy is working well in their country (Pew Research Center).  Less than 10% trust their government “to do the right thing” for their country.  (Pew Research Center). 

Recognizing the anger and frustrations of the vast majority of the people, some candidates have proposed some new ideas that are considered “thinking out of the box” and would have been considered unthinkable in the past;

**Granting a conditional amnesty to cartels that agree to certain conditions (as yet undefined).
**To reduce theft cut off the hand of a thief as punishment (not clear if applies to public officials that steal from the treasury or just street thieves)
**Conduct a vote of confidence every 2 years on policies of the President.
**Eliminate or drastically reduce pensions for President and Congress (currently equal to their annual salary while in office). 
** Eliminate immunity for prosecution of crimes while public officials are in office. 

Maybe my proposed solution from “thinking out of the box” for reducing murders that are drug related was just a few years  early.  What are your thoughts?  
*******************************************************

May 23, 2012

A note before you go further.  I was just about to post this when I looked at the most recent post which was by Athena, entitled " Expatriates in drug violence-riddled Mexico: Stay or go?"  I thought, "hey I might better read this before I post something about hanging narco killers.  I read it and acting like the fool that I have been called many times here goes the "post message" button.

I have been reviewing comments posted on BB over the last year and many if not most relate to two questions;

(1)What type of human being can do these things to a fellow human being? 


(2)What is the solution to stopping the violence in Mexico?


I am including the discussion of question #1 in what is intended to be primarily a post on capital punishment because I feel the two questions are closely tied together, especially in Mexico.  I say "especially in Mexico" because the Mexican constitution is heavily slanted toward rehabilitation of the criminal rather than punishment.

 Article 22 provides:
"The death penalty remains prohibited for political crimes, and also for most others. It may only be imposed for treason to the Nation in a foreign war, for parricide, for homicide with treachery, premeditation or profit; for arson, kidnapping, highway robbery, piracy, or serious criminal offenses against military order.  

To me, the definition of when the death penalty is allowed is broad enough to fit most of the murders committed by cartels, but the commentators and the debate during adoption of the 1917 Constitution argue otherwise.  So in all likelihood, the constitution would have to be amended.

There are many provisions of the Constitution which are really a joke.  Some examples of the jokes;

The same Article 22 also provides that; "- Penalties of mutilation, dishonor, branding, whipping, blows with a stick, torture of any type, excessive fines, confiscation of possessions, or any other penalties in excess of what is necessary to punish the offense remain prohibited."

Article 18 provides "There shall be detention only for crimes that merit punishment of the individual. The sites of detention shall be distinct from prisons for the serving of sentences, and they shall be completely separated from each other." (40% of the people in MX prisons have never been to trial, they are only being "detained" with the convicted criminals.They are not separated as const. mandates)

Article 19 provides; "All mistreatment in apprehension or in prison, all discomforts that are inflicted without legal motive, and all fees or contributions (BRIBES) in jails are abuses that will be prohibited by law and curbed by the authorities. (Parenthesis and emphasis added by DD)

Article 21 Mx Constitution The performance of police institutions will be governed by the principles of legality, efficiency, professionalism, and honor.

Ok, enough jokes, lets get to the psycho's and the public hangings.

Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of disregard for the rights of others and the rules of society. Psychopaths have a lack of empathy and remorse, and have very shallow emotions. They are generally regarded as callous, selfish, dishonest, arrogant, aggressive, impulsive, irresponsible, and hedonistic.  


 To me those characteristics define a sicario.

No psychiatric or psychological organization has sanctioned a diagnosis of "psychopathy" itself. Despite the similarity of the names, psychopaths are rarely psychotic.

Although psychopathy is associated with and in some cases defined by conduct problems, criminality or violence, most psychopaths are not violent.  According to one expert, there may be as much as 1% to 2% of the general population that could by defined as a psychopathic.  


It could be the used car salesman lying through his teeth when selling you that dream car, and then laughing with his friends how lucky you were to get it off the lot in one piece.  No remorse.
 

Some experts have described psychopaths as "intraspecies predators".

Can a Kid Be a Psychopath?  


 We have all seen the videos here on BB of teenagers, in some cases very young teenagers beating someone with a bat until they are dead, or using a chainsaw to decapitate someone, laughing all the time.



The groundbreaking HBO documentary "Child of Rage" years ago showed how horrific abuse and neglect could leave a child unable to bond with other people, turning them into children "without conscience, who can hurt or even kill without remorse." In other words: the child becomes a psychopath.

But what about the kids who aren't abused? What about the ones who, for no discernible reason, do horrible things to other people?

The New York Times article mentions the case of 9-year-old Jeffrey Bailey Jr., who in 1986 pushed a 3-year-old into the deep end of a Florida swimming pool and then pulled up a chair to watch the child drown; after the toddler died, Bailey got up and went home.

    In 1993, Jon Venables and Robert Thompson, both 10 years old, took 2-year-old James Bulger by the hand and led the trusting toddler out of a shopping mall in Liverpool, England. Once away from the mall, they spent hours torturing him before beating him to death, reports said.
  
  In 1998, Joshua Phillips' mother was cleaning his room when she discovered the dead body of their 8-year-old neighbor, Maddie Clifton, under his bed. The 14-year-old Phillips says he accidentally hit the girl in the eye with a baseball bat and then panicked when she screamed, so he took her to his room and beat and then stabbed her until she stopped.
   
 Alyssa Bustamente was 15 when she confessed to luring her 9-year-old neighbor Elizabeth Olten into a nearby forest and killing her in 2009. "I strangled them and slit their throat and stabbed them now they're dead," Bustamante wrote in her diary at the time. "It was ahmazing. As soon as you get over the 'ohmygawd I can't do this' feeling, it's pretty enjoyable. I'm kinda nervous and shaky though right now. Kay, I gotta go to church now...lol." In February, she was sentenced to life in prison.
 

   Eric Harris -- who, with his friend Dylan Klebold, killed 13 people and injured 24 others when they opened fire at Columbine High School in Colorado in 1999 -- had several of the hallmarks of being a psychopath. As ABC News points out, he was described as "controlling, manipulative, and sadistic, but very much in touch with reality."

"Psychopaths don't feel guilty because they are blind to guilt," Frank Ochberg, a former FBI psychiatrist who led the counseling team after Columbine, told ABC News. And, unlike with psychosis (when people are delusional or out-of-touch with reality), psychopaths know exactly what they're doing -- they just don't care how it affects others.

It's not as if these kids simply lack a moral compass. In "Child of Rage," 6-year-old Beth opens her blue eyes wide and calmly tells her psychiatrist how she'd like to hurt, and even kill, her adoptive parents -- a Methodist preacher and his wife -- and her biological brother. She's calm and conversational as she describes how she has deliberately harmed and killed animals, how she drives pins into her brother and sexually molests him, how she repeatedly slammed his head into a cement floor and only stopped because someone caught her.

It is not my purpose here to debate cure or treatment for psychopathy, but rather to decide what to do with them after they are caught.  According to some experts, there is little evidence of a cure or effective treatment for psychopathy; no medications can instill empathy, and psychopaths who undergo traditional talk therapy might become more adept at manipulating others and more likely to commit crime.   



STOPPING THE VIOLENCE


Havana (one of our great reporters and contributors from the past) succintly tied my two questions together; (1) psychopaths and (2)punishment.
 
Havana--"studies do indicate the death penalty is a viable deterrent of violent crime but it is not in cases of sociopathic and psychopathic personalities. Sicarios probably fall into those categories."

Here are a few of the typical comments posted on BB Forum regarding stopping the violence;

The Magician.  "There has to be a solution, but who has it?"

Dratter."what can be done ANYTHING, WHEN,HOW,WHO, this mess makes me
 sick."

Kylesam"I do support the death penalty in theory."
I

Chivis. "death penalty...I am beginning to think you are a very smart young man, especially when you agree with me!"

dario.  "We badly need the death penalty like Texas."

Chivo -- "If Mexico treated the scum bags like Malaysia there wouldnt be any narcos in Mexico!"
I believe it is way, way past the point of no return... So then what is the solution to stop the cancer from spreading"
YES, the ONLY real solution is death for ALL SCUM NARCOS!

Frontera.  "Death squads in the 1960's in Mexico worked to get rid of and stop Communism,

OhTheCalIsOnYou.  "Would death squads work to solve a lot (not all) of the narco stuff going on ? I'm wondering if this wouldn't stop a lot of the crap in Mexico from happening."

Pinchegringo. "it wouldn't surprise me if Mexico found a few US soldiers in their country without their permission."

cHIVO. "I hope that the U.S military gets a shot at the scum bag criminal cartels... ALL of them need to be exterminated like rats from the face of the earth..." 

 
Those comments from some of the most respected and knowledgeable commentators on BB boil down to 4 proposed solutions to solving the violence problem in Mx:

1. Chivo's "kill the scumbags", "shoot them on sight" doesn't seem to me to be a practical solution. (@Chivo. I didn't include that quote about shooting on sight, but I think I have read it in some of your posts before).  

2. Death squads have been mentioned as a solution many times.  IMO opinion that is not a practical solution.  In addition to it being a gross violation of the rule of law which Mexico desperately needs to adopt, it is not public enough.  For death squads to work, their work has to kept secret and only spread through rumors and whispers.

3. Bringing in the US military, invited or uninvited, to combat the cartels and destroy them. IMO that proposal has so many holes in it and is so unrealistic I am not going to give it a lot of discussion, but merely point out the flaws in the proposal.  First, a recent poll showed 82% of Mexicans are opposed to US troops coming to their aid.  Their reluctance to allow US troops on Mx. soil probably has something to do with the other 13 times the US has invaded it's "little brother" south of the border.  Second, the record of success  of the US in it's last 2 wars Iraq and Afghanistan is not very encouraging.  I am working on an article about US intervention in other countries since WW2 that I hope to post soon. That post will further my argument that US Military intervention is not a good idea. The record is not very good.  Although the "death squads" of US special forces in Mexico's "dirty war" in the 60's and 70's had some success in taking out some Communist insurgent leaders, those insurgents were never really a threat to MX and not nearly on the scale of the cartels.

(Speaking of the US invasions of Mexico, probably the worst sore spot for the Mexican people was the Mexican-American war which ended on Sept.26, 1847 when Mexico City fell to the US Army.  In the treaty that was negotiated Mexico ceded to the United States Upper California and New Mexico. This was known as the Mexican Cession and included present-day Arizona and New Mexico and parts of Utah, Nevada, and Colorado (see Article V of the treaty). Mexico relinquished all claims to Texas and recognized the Rio Grande as the southern boundary with the United States.  Negotiations drug on for several months.  Gold was discovered at Sutters Mill in California on Jan. 26, 1848.  The treaty was then rushed through and signed on Feb.2, 1848, seven days after the gold discovery. I have always been a little skeptical of the timing of finalizing that treaty giving California to the US.)

4. Change the Mexican Constitution and implement the death penalty.  
Death Penalty?  A deterrent?  I have been in agreement with those calling for a death penalty in Mexico.  I also have been in agreement with those who believe the death penalty would not deter the sicarios and other canon fodder of the cartels from pursuing their chosen way of life.

But, maybe it is time to think outside the box.  The current ideas and policies to deter violence and drug trafficking are not working.  

In Nuevo Leon state there were more than 685 drug-related killings by mid-May, according to media tallies. This put it ahead of even Chihuahua state, with 560 gangland slayings

San Fernando Migrant Massacre 72 Tortured And Slaughtered
San Fernando Bus Massacres 193 Tortured And Slaughtered
Taxo 56 Tortured And Slaughtered
Monterrey 51 Tortured And Slaughtered
Monterrey Casino Royale Fire 61 Burned Alive
Mexican Marina Torture Killing Videos
Torreon News Paper Fire Attack
Nuevo Laredo News Paper Attack
Apodaca Prison 44 Tortured And Murdered 30 Zetas Escape
Peten, Guatamala Massacre 27 Tortured And Beheaded
Nuevo Laredo's Colosio Bridge Torture And Hanging 9
Jalisco 18 Innocent Tortured And Slaughtered
Cadereyta 49 Innocent Tortured And Slaughtered

First, while the death penalty  would  not be a deterrent to those who face possible death every day, it would be an appropriate punishment for the most horrific crimes.  The Mexican constitution emphasizes rehabilitation as the goal of the criminal justice system.  That needs to be changed for certain crimes.

Secondly, I know this proposal is really thinking outside the box.  But, maybe it is time to think outside the box.  

I PROPOSE A PUBLIC HANGING AS PUNISHMENT FOR CARTEL MURDERS. Not a Sadam Hussein private style hanging.  but wait until you have a big group of convicted narco killers, a 100, 50, whatever, and hang them publicly at the same time on the Zocola (the main plaza in Mexco city). 

 

The cartels commit many if not most of their horrific attrocities to shock and instill fear among the populace, and to show their power and control.  If the government inflicted this horrific punishment on convicted Cartel killers, it's purpose would be to shock and instill fear among the cartels, and inspire respect for the rule of law in the populace and show it's power and control 

After a few of those, I think capos might think about taking their money and retiring or running.  Some sicarios might take up other lines of work.  A bunch of halcones and young hoods might look for legitimate jobs.  The public in general would come to respect the rule of law.

If the govt. wanted to mock the cartels a little bit, a sign much like a narcomanta might be posted at the gallows.  
 
FALSE ADVERTISING; "The Zeta operations group wants you, soldier or ex-soldier," one said. "We offer a good salary, food and attention for your family. Don't suffer hunger and abuse anymore."
 

 "The govt. and people of Mx are truly sorry if you were seduced by this False Advertising and joined that criminal organization.  This is what could happen to you if you did.

I know the human rights groups would scream their heads off, but if the trials were open to the public and the press, fair and open, with a fair appeals process, then Mexico would be following the rule of law.  As to its effect on young people, it might instill a respect for the law and what is right and wrong at an early age.  That can't be a bad thing.

I know it sounds crazy.  That is what I thought too when I first started thinking about it.  But the more I thought about, I began to think "Why not". It would an appropriate punishment to fit the atrocities these scum have committed.  It would be bold and strong move and might move Mexico along a path to law and order much faster than the decades that most people predict. 


Maybe no other country in the world could, but with conditions as they are in Mexico today, I think Mexico could pull it off.  Don't confuse what I am proposing with punishments in Singapore and Malaysia which has gotten a lot of attention on the Forum lately. Those stories were about death for dealing drugs. 

 I am talking about hanging for convictions of "cartel related homicides"  Ultimately maybe a lady like Chivis could walk across the plaza at 10PM and feel safe as she did in Singapore.

The proposal might even win a Presidential election if it were presented in the proper manner.  If you were trailing in the polls by 20 points 5 weeks before the election, what would you have to lose?

Remember the quote attributed to El Lazca on recent narcomanta; 


"The government must make a pact with us because if not we will have to overthrow it and take power by force."

Think about it and tell me what you think or a better solution.
DD  

113 comments:

  1. That Obrador wanting to run for President of Mexico, said if elected he will request Amesty, for the criminals in prison. That's dumb he is not in favor of the death penalty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. His numbers may soon dwindle due to his poor performance at the debate. Added with the controversial issue of amnesty.
      Anaya is close enough to make a surprisingly defeat if he plays his cards right.

      E42

      Delete
    2. 8:55 decriminalizing drug trafficking and addiction does not mean impunity for criminals, also letting go of minor delinquents that owe 1 000 pesos fines or bonds would release law enforcement and prison space for the worst criminals, don't believe communist propaganda and read more about AMLO's platform, because it looks like somebody fed you the wrong koool-aid

      Delete
  2. Most people are just worrying about the drug/narco culture, but what really needs to change is the actual Mexican government/politicians. México has enough resources to be one of the best countries in the world. Money, money wouldn’t be a problem, if only, and only if all the government/politicians wouldn’t steal the Mexican citizens money. And yet, everybody is worrying about cartels, as a distraction, and if not that, a soccer game, lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting comment @9:48
      I recall many many years back when a celebrity believe to be Veronica Castro or something of similar to last name. She spoke on behalf of its citizens. Objectively and criticizing the Mexican government for the lack of not doing enough on a tv show.
      Which resulted with a ban on her appearance for some time by government.
      Government censorship has eased up since then but still exists if pushed to do so.

      E42

      Delete
    2. Its called televisa.

      Delete
  3. “thinking out of the box”

    -Limit children that couples can have to 3 in order to curb the manpower of cartels(this could mean subsidized birth control or punishment)

    -introduce philosophy, logic/morals/ethics, finance, education on nutrition, a code of honor system into all levels of education

    -maybe introduce nationalism into the public conscious so citizens can ultimately care for one another and hopefully this will inject a sense of self-awareness into Mexicans

    -Mexico need to look deeply into Successful countries(low crime/high IQ/high standards of living) and take inspiration from them

    -schools should offer sports after school time to keep children fit and help those parents that have to work.

    -possibly, fully legalize drugs(this could easily be a slippery slope but hopefully my recommendation of altering the educational system limits the damage

    -jail and specifically prison should be seen as rehabilitation and not punishment. This will hopefully result in education for criminals but still limiting their freedoms.

    -execute criminals that keep going to jail(this only applies to people above the age of 24) which means 5 entries into jail/prison. people under that age will have an allowance of 5 offenses, if they reach that limit then they will be held in prison until the age of 24.

    This will deter crime and will hopefully jolt people into caring how their loved ones act

    -kill kingpins, sicarios, and drug dealers that are caught and currently in prison. Offenders can only be killed if the courts have 100% proof of the offenses. This will hopefully give a bleak and grim connotation to those that are thinking of joining a gang.

    When it comes to executing someone I've always been for a bullet to the head and cremating the body. This is cost affective, humane, and saves on space.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @10:05AM Mexican birth rate is 2.1 (just about the same as US) But even the idea would take more than decade to make any difference. Those 3 babies have to grow up to at least early teens to be of any use to cartels.

      Many of your recommendations regarding education show a lack of familiarity with Mexico. Drive by any school after classes let out and you will see the "futball (soccer team practicing Baseball and basketball are also popular.

      Many of the subjects you propose to add to the curriculum are a pipe dream because they are beyond the comprehension of younger students. A large percentage do not finish secondary school (or just don't go on to high school. I think the number is only 20 or 25 percent graduate from high school.

      But your concept of drastically improving the educational system is spot on.

      The Mexican Constitution already specifically says that incarceration shall be for rehabilitation and not for punishment. (hasn't worked to well has it).

      Your proposal for Capos, sicarios is not that different than mine except you prefer a bullet rather than a noose and yours is done behind prison walls. Mine achieves humiliating them by hanging them in public and also in doing it in mass to get the other criminals attention make them realize that could happen to them.

      Delete
    2. Rehabilitation has not worked in the US for some time.
      Most programs for educational purposes and trade programs have been eliminated. So rehabilitation for those have no way to succeed in society upon release.
      Moreover, the discrimination practices which continue by employers towards those individuals with a criminal record for a second opportunity to become productive members in society. IMO a repetitive cycle which has led to more ex- criminals to be recycled back into the judiciary system.
      Mexico has always lacked funding and resources to indicate prison systems actually rehabilitate. Overcrowding and poor housing conditions have allocated funds to other areas of dire needs.

      E42


      Delete
    3. Batallion 3-16 Honduras, had the solution to the problems of drug addicts, drug traffickers, communists, guerrillas and the need to show work to get free days and furloughs from work, killing innocent citizens helped until people denounced the situation.
      Widely practised kidnappings, torture, extra-judiciary executions, are still denied all over LatinAmerica, specially now in mexico, but the US government has declassified "documents" full of reports from US government agents and Human Rights organizations that were suppressed for years, president Bill Clinton released a lot of them.
      Google: Latin American governments Death Squads.
      But there is hope, as soon as the involvement of the government destination squads is exposed, peace envoys propose the creation of commissions of trutb for peace and justice that forgives the worst criminals involved, military intelligence/ counter-intelligence, police and military sponsored and blessed by their government.
      Colombia excelled specially with alvaro uribe velez' autodefensas, guerrillas, FSRC, FMLN, paracos, milicos and a polesia nacional that rented police academy cadets by the
      hour or by the night, day, week, whatever you needed, from a catalog of fotos. Even South Africa still has its truth commissions trying to save some face for the biggest SA criminals, so, the sooner they are exposed the sooner they start proposing the reconciliation through tokens of Decency.
      Meanwhile we can keep blaming the big bad evil narcos until Jesus comes back.

      Delete
  4. I like that idea of guillotine..in a pubic square. To cartel members and corrupt -cops public officials soldiers- it would send a strong message and put a slow down to all this mayhem!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A little barbaric and inhumane don’t you think?
      Humanity should not revert to the days of a civilization whose lack for human rights are displayed.

      E42

      Delete
    2. @5:36 War is barbaric and inhumane but sometimes it is necessary. When Mexico became the 2nd or 3rd most dangerous country in the world, I think it is time for it take drastic and bold action to stop the spiraling violence now, not in 1 or 2 more decades. Yes the human rights organizations will scream and condemn Mexico. But the people of Mexico will stand up and cheer "Viva Mexico". They will regain respect and trust in their govt. for doing something to stop the killings. not just talking and making promises. From there they can move on to solving some of Mexico's problems.

      Delete
    3. I see your point dd. Totally agree with your opinion of war being barbaric and inhumane.
      Moreover, actions that are necessary.

      However, war is not barbaric nor inhumane where the sounds of drums and trumpets are emanating. This reference pertains to wars of Nations.A justification for the atrocities that will be committed under law. ....,., Voltaire

      E42

      Delete
    4. Mexico is not the dangerous barbaric part,
      --the Mexican government and its military and police and politicians that get to spend the 2 or 3 billion dollars the US feed them "to help fight crime" with their brand of terrorism of state, public corruption and narco-terrorism.
      Mexico is not about that like the American people are not guilty of its government crimes around the world.
      --DD, Why are you sponsoring more killings rather than due process? Have you got your contract on mexico?

      Delete
    5. Everything you describe of barbarism already is perpetrated by the gob and in more inhumane matters than has been described above. What are missing are just and open trials.

      Delete
    6. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    7. It's silly to talk about this sort of thing, because you can't impose any type of penalty, even a slap on the wrist, unless the criminal is arrested and tried. And do you REALLY trust Mexico's criminal justice system to make decisions about peoples' lives?

      Delete
  5. NOOOO death penalty for Mexico. In a country where the Napoleonic Law "guilty until proven innocent", applies this is the stupidest idea of all!
    You want people to stop the killings? Then fight to stop consumption and or better wages across the country and hold politicians accountable for their promises also. Not easy to do but not entirely impossible either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 10:21 you’re right. May I add schools for kids and parents too,

      Delete
    2. 2:31 no money for public schools for kids or parents, it all gets stolen and put in US Banks and real estate properties like La Chuky's but now the US is fighting for the education budget with their education reform to privatize all the money right away instead of wasting it on ignorant mexican oligarchs

      Delete
    3. 10:21 - Completely agree.

      Phelpso

      Delete
    4. Stop the apologies. Mexico has been Mexico for hundreds of years. Blame the Spanish. Blame Moors. Blame Aztecs. Blame on.......stand up first. Accept responsibility. Look at the border. Catholic nuns are the liberal heroes. They should go to Mexico. Evangelize from the inside. I support Catholism but. ...Catholic priest trying to save the 1 sheep. Loosing 99.

      Delete
    5. @4:07 no fuckin apologies here. Just stop consumption and stop with the barbaric thoughts of executions for the sake of "saving" drug addicts lives. One life is not worth more than another!

      Delete
    6. Barbaric? What the hell are you talking about? The cartels need to die, this is not barbaric at all. Even if drugs were legalized they would continue to oppress the population with other crimes such as kidnapping, extortions, human trafficking ecc. their greed knows no boundaries. Put them all to death. Period.

      Delete
  6. Death Penalty should be a form of punishment in Mexico, do as they do in Texas, an eye for and eye. I'm troubled by the comments made by AMLO, he seems likely to win the presidential election. Give amnesty to those cowards that commit horrendous crimes? Ridiculous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But is punishment a deterrent???

      Delete
    2. @10:13AM Punishment is not a deterrent unless the criminal is afraid of it. typically they are not afraid of incarceration, nor even the death penalty because they think it can't happen to them. BUT if you hang 100 if them at a time in a very public place , some of the others (not all) will have second thoughts about that "could happen to me". Add to that they will see many of them hanging from a gallows pee in their pants and defecate while they twitch at the end of that rope. They may fear that humilation more than anything. It might also make some kids decide they don't really want "the life" if they could end up like that. Those kind of hangings, say once a week would definitely make recruiting by the cartels a lot harder.

      Delete
    3. Hang police and military commanders for incompetence,
      THAT WOULD LIGHT up A BIG piece of coal up their ass , hanging their Commander in Chief and secretary of defense would be priceless, maybe we could use some "real smart narcos" to do their work for them from inside their prison cells.

      Delete
    4. 10:13 Every time you get rid of one of these cold blooded bastards , you saved lives . Deterrent ? Probably not for most but he will be gone and will cause no more problems .
      Better paying jobs ? Might help keep the petty criminal straight . Not going to change the evil people from acting evil .Its what they are

      Delete
  7. Sounds good to me, and is pretty much what I have been suggesting as well. You can't rehabilitate someone that has no empathy, rehabilitation requires a sense of guilt and having done wrong. Instead of mass incarceration, and the monetary drain it creates, the government would simply be visiting punishment less heinous than the act that brought the individual to court in the first place. It is hard to argue "cruel and unusual punishment" with regards to hanging for an individual that has tortured and dismembered someone.

    KB

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi KB, not sure your comment about monetary drain is correct. If you add up all of the legal fees that are involved in pretty much every death sentence's appeals, of which there are many, it costs more to kill someone than it does to incarcerate them for life.
      Most experts I have read agree that the death sentence itself is not a deterrent to murder, statistics prove such to be correct.
      So if its not a deterrent, and is more expensive in the long run, why do countries do it?
      It certainly is an emotive subject.

      Delete
    2. Its just More expensive because The trials Are delayed. Staying 15 years on DR is nit decreasing costs.
      Everyone who got life without parol should get killed instead of wasting tax Money.

      Delete
    3. Frankly, the appeals process is borked when it allows criminals to live long past when they should have been put to death. I understand not wanting to kill an innocent person, but 2-3 appeals should not take 30+ years and if you can't prove you are innocent with 2-3 tries, after having been proven guilty, you are unlikely to do so with further chances. It takes more time and money because we entertain their bullshit; we do not take decades to put down a rabid animal after we have determined they are rabid, yet we are willing to do so for humans that can be far more cruel than any wild animal.

      Most federal trials take 4 days to 2 weeks after they start (death penalty ones do tend to be longer though). State trials tend to be about the same length, but also involve more appeals. Time after submission to be heard by the US Supreme Court tends to be 12-24 months. Overall it can take 20+ years to go through the entire process for most criminals, and a lot of that time is spent waiting to find a lawyer willing to work for little, or no, pay compared to what they usually make. That's where most of the cost is, the incarceration time waiting on appeals, having to pay lawyers to review the cases (usually takes years there too), etc.

      I have to question the experts on the death penalty not being a deterrent though. It may not be so for those who lack empathy, but death sure as hell scares most people. There is a reason many criminals flip to get reduced sentences, and it's not just the threat of a long jail sentence. The reason it isn't much of a deterrent in Western nations is more likely because it takes so long to carry out the sentence.

      Most of the "experts" I have read are big on presenting evidence that the death penalty doesn't deter crime, but they rarely go into why, and they carefully leave out countries where the execution is swift after punishment in their assessments. We also care too damn much about how much pain someone is in when put to death. The drugs used are expensive as heck; hangings, guillotine, and firing squads are much cheaper. The concept of "cruel and unusual" should take into account the method(s) used by the guilty individual to commit their crime(s) and anything less cruel or unusual should not be considered so when searching for the method of death used on them.

      KB

      Delete
    4. The countries that are using the death penalty don't bother with all the appeals. They just kill them and get it over with.

      Delete
    5. well we are talking about the death sentence in Mexico, not other countries, since the new Mexican law system is based on the current US system, one would think that the appeals process for death sentences would be similar.
      Given that, of all the articles I have read on the death sentence, as this is not the first time this subject has been raised in reader comments here, I can see nobody that actually releases any data to say that the death sentence is a deterrent.
      Does someone taking a life, justify taking their life in return? Im referring here to the judicial system here, and not someone defending their life against an attacker.
      As a Christian country, the religious position is to turn the other cheek, not to go old testament and an eye for an eye.
      If a criminal knows that the crime he committed carries the death sentence, is he more likely to shoot it out with law enforcement, and does this lead to the death of more officers on duty? There are many knock on effects of the death sentence, that make it hard to justify.
      As regards the method, if you are to do it, I would say hanging, as done in the far east, and in the UK up to the 1960's is a humane enough method, if the hangman knows his job, weight vs length of drop. Its certainly a lot cheaper than lethal injection.
      The finality of the death sentence is also a problem when we find that 4.1 percent of all people executed were then found to be innocent. That is twice the number of people who were exonerated.

      Delete
    6. https://deathpenaltyinfo.org/documents/FactSheet.pdf

      Delete
  8. I have lived in Mexico as an ex patriot for nearly twenty years. I also have worked in several of the prisons here as a Christian missionary. I've been a participant here on BB for about ten years as well. I am personally acquainted with many Mexican men who have served time in the prisons. In other words, I have some personal knowledge of the situation here. In my opinion, the problem in Mexico isn't so much with the laws that are in place, but it's in the enforcement of them. The truth is that most crimes are never prosecuted here. Murderers kill people knowing that they'll never be prosecuted. The justice system is fully corrupt. The municipal police departments are owned by whatever cartel owns the plaza in which they work. State and Federal police aren't much better. The Army is corrupt. The Navy, not so much. Changing laws will produce nothing. The people of Mexico need to take back their country. That, in my opinion, is the only answer. How is the question.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Would likely require a revolution or outside intervention. The first solution is rather difficult in a country where gun ownership is effectively illegal though; that should be a lesson to people in other countries looking to take firearms from the law-abiding by the way...

      KB

      Delete
    2. @7:42AM Those countries thinking of banning guns might also look at countries like the UK and Australia that have effectively banned gun ownership and in doing so drastically reduced the homicide rate.

      Delete
    3. @9:41

      They have reduced the gun death rate, not the overall homicide rate. And with a gun you can have chances if you are attacked, if you are disarmed even wo thugs with knives would kill yo effortlessly.

      Delete
    4. Well in the UK they have only banned pistols, and semi automatic rifles above .22 hornet in caliber. You can still buy semi autos in .22 LR and .22 mag.

      Delete
  9. The truth is it's the women in Mexico that have the balls. The attitude of most of the men is, "no pase nada."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hanging from their chins.

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Yeah vote for AMLO.the man who wants a pardon for all criminals...let him win so we can have civil war.

      Delete
  11. What's else can you do??? The hug a thug technique is not working for Mexicans living in this hell..

    ReplyDelete
  12. Public hanging.
    -Sol Prendido

    ReplyDelete
  13. Drastic times call for drastic measures

    ReplyDelete
  14. Interesting post dd.
    One thing is clearly visible today in many parts of the world; that implementations of laws and amendments are often applied due to circumstances facing the security of ones nation. This proposal for the death penalty for those individuals whom you speak of should be applied. As long it’s applied fairly and unbiased. Furthermore,, through a judiciary system that allows individuals with rights to defend oneself in court accordingly. Killing one without due process will be no different from those who commit such atrocities. Besides there may be a curtailment for those who may want to participate in such behavior.
    There are many legal battles brewing here in the US; Gun control, privacy issues pertaining cyber information / security ect.
    Despite such implementations erected there will be many who oppose. Unfortunately, we cannot make everyone happy. A given truth of life.

    Well you are aware of my stance pertaining Amnesty for those narcos. Admittance of such atrocities can’t be overshadowed by form of forgiveness.

    E42

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @E42

      Gun control?????

      Ahahahahahaha it has worked well in Mexico https://mises.org/wire/borderland-homicides-show-mexicos-gun-control-has-failed

      For the narcos, i mean.... Tell the narcos to try and do that shit in the USA with 300 millions of guns around where many citizens are just as well armed as the narcos gunmen (but they are much more in numbers) and see what happens.

      The Narcos in Mexico are very happy about the gun control in the country. They can bully the population without having to fear anything, because the government is in cahoots with them and most normal people don’t have the means to fight back.

      Let me quote from the article


      “The pre-packaged retort to this phenomena often repeated in the media is that the US causes the high homicide rates in Mexico by exporting guns to Mexico. We're told that criminals go into the US, buy guns legally in Texas (for example) and then sell the guns illegally to cartels in Mexico.
      Dave Kopel has shown that this claim isn't true. But, even if it were true, it wouldn't explain much by itself since we're left asking ourselves why criminals don' just do the same thing to the same homicidal effect in the United States. If it's so fruitful for violent criminals to buy guns in the US and sell them to organized crime rings, why aren't those criminals doing the same thing in the US?
      Well, the answer is the criminals probably are are well armed in the US, and have a lot of guns just like criminals in Mexico do. The difference in actual crimes carried out, however, likely lies in the fact that law abiding Mexicans have been disarmed, while law abiding Americans have not.
      Gun laws are very restrictive in Mexico, as The Atlantic notes:
      Mexico can hardly be described as a heavily armed society. With around 2.5 million registered gun owners and at least 13 million more illegal arms in circulation, the country has a ratio of just 15 guns for every 100 people, well below the global average. Unlike in the U.S., civilian possession in Mexico is considered a privilege, not a right and is tightly regulated under federal law since the 1970s. Extensive background checks are required of all purchasers, and there are heavy penalties and even imprisonment for non-compliance. Astonishingly, there is just one legal gun shop in the country, compared to more than 54,000 federally licensed firearm dealers and thousands of pawnshops and gun shows scattered across the U.S.
      In other words, in Mexico, there is an immense asymmetry in gun ownership between violent criminals and law-abiding citizens. Criminals have abundant access to the means of violent coercion, and the will to use it. Ordinary citizens, on the other hand, have, practically speaking, no access. Meanwhile, local officials can be bought by the criminals, which means that private citizens will then find themselves facing two heavily armed groups who are free to behave maliciously toward the general population with little fear of reprisals.
      The Atlantic author notes that in Mexico, there are about 15 guns per 100 persons, which is likely referencing the data released by the Small Arms Survey. The same survey estimates that, by contrast, there are from 88 to 100 guns per 100 persons in the United States. The US far outpaces even gun-friendly Switzerland which has about 45 guns per 100 persons”.

      Delete
    2. Interesting comment.
      Note: I am a strong supporter of the second amendment. Family members carry FOID cards and in process of obtaining carry and conceal permits.
      As long as gun ownership display safety requirements and abide to the laws. I have no objections.
      Reference of past comments are regarding legal issues which are brewing nothing more.

      E42

      Delete
  15. DD: Great discussion issues! I will post my reactions later on, after I give your important questions the deeper thinking they deserve.
    I hope to see many responses.

    Mexico-Watcher

    ReplyDelete
  16. Chivis we both know this would not be the answer maybe if we had law abiding police judge's you get the point. With what we have in our criminal sytem as the authority are just about as crooked as the rest. Innocent people would die left and right.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And that’s why honest people should raise their fists and fight back. We can’t rely on the government.

      Delete
    2. I agree. No death penalty for Mexico it would be lethal to law abiding citizens who are "in the way" and social activists for starters. there would be no living autodefensas...for sure

      Delete
    3. @Chivis

      What about El Marino Loco? That man was an idol, what is he doing now? Don’t tell me he is dead.

      Delete
    4. The current practice of death penalty as applied by the Mexican melitary and polesias and their myriad private security corporation like the 6 private security corporations run by former SSO veracruz state Arturo Bermudez zurita. now he still runs them from prison where yunes linares keeps him as his private singing parrot.

      Delete
  17. Sorry but mexico already has DP. Last year, close to 30.000 death sentenced enforced in mexico.
    Mexican judges, prosecutors, police etc. are bribed, so how could DP help with this?

    Stalin once said, ...kill a few to scare thousends.
    Going after a bunch of narcos will only help if you also go after the worst politicians, judges...!

    Prison system requires improvements, increase min.wages and salary for the police. Mexico needs a much broader approach to fight all these things.
    But it is still not time for change, things aren't bad enough.

    elranarene

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. However, Stalin did not take into account that killing doesn't scare anyone when it comes to money and addiction. Different times.

      Delete
    2. Bank robber, terrorist, murderer, ladiesman Joseph Stalin escaped Siberia like 5 times, he was also a colleague of mine, a process operations technician specialized in shoveling boatloads of dirty mud on russia's oil fields probably with the Koch Brothers daddy developer of gasoline refineries for El Padrecito...

      Delete
  18. There will always be violence no matter what because of corruption but Mexico needs advice from Colombia to control the situation but then again I think the u.s is feeding of Mexico’s violence. I just don’t get it, if the u.s is so Nosy with other countries going into their territories but they won’t do it to Mexico?
    Maybe the u.s is already controlling Mexico in one way or another. Funny how the U.S has the right to own firearms but not there next door neighbor (Mexico) $$$

    Note: I’m not anti-government or none of that, I’m just going with the Obvious maybe I’m wrong

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mexico doesn’t want help from the US and in the US it would not be seen as politically correct to be nosy in the affairs of a country that borders the USA... if Mexico did use help from the USA then maybe there wouldn’t be the build the wall campaign?? Mexico has be dropping off their illegal immigrates from Central America at the US border for years.. remember La Bestia?? An estimated half million per year ride La Bestia or el tren de la muerte as Mexico turns a blind eye... reminds one of Cuba dumping its criminals onto south Florida’s beaches... so if those countries are gonna play that game maybe the US should play hardball as well...but it would be easier if Mexico would just ask or cooperate...

      Allow Mexican citizens to arm themselves adequately just as the criminals do... taking a knife to a gunfight doesn’t work and in Mexico the pen is not mightier than the gun as evidenced by the murders of multiple journalists... the death penalty is used to instill fear into innocent people in Mexico so use it as well to do the same to the criminals... criminals run their businesses from Mexican jails but can they do it from a Mexican grave???

      GC

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    3. 9:51 hiding the truth will not help fix things,
      what, can't we handle the truth anymore?

      Delete
  19. I believe Mexico is too currupt right now pick up the death penalty. It's gonna be abused and witch ever cartel has backing from government will abuse the power. Everybody dies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Law and order starts with our leaders. Without honest Leadership u Can't expect people to be honest and follow the the Rule Of law. God Bless Mexico Hope I can go back in peace someday

      Delete
  20. Burned alive like int the middle east

    ReplyDelete
  21. I am all for killing the scumbags as Chivo said, BUT, we live in Mexico, where any polititian can blame someone as a sicario and get rid of him, and with someone as AMLO up in the polls, this is a NO-NO.

    I get the idea, but the fact Marinas have been killing golfos,
    zetas, and treviños all over tamps(And I´m all for this BTW) and still they keep recruiting young idiots, so I´m not sure this is a good idea AS OF NOW.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. “I am all for killing the scumbags as Chivo said, BUT, we live in Mexico, where any polititian can blame someone as a sicario and get rid of him,”

      That’s why there is the need of a civil war, of an armed popular revolution.

      Delete
    2. Luis Donald Colossio got the DP applied to him, but Carlos Salinas de Gortari had been murdering friend and foe since he was a young minister in de la madrid's bed

      Delete
  22. BTW, DD, what do you think of the proposed amnisty by AMLO? Do you think guys like those that killed the 3 students in Jalisco deserve some kind of amnisty?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Popular revolution is what needs to happen in Mexico. The autodefensas groups are kicking the cartels asses, but there should be more of them http://time.com/5755/mexico-vigilantes-knights-templar-cartel-michoacan/

    Mexican citizens are much more than the cartels, if they fight back, the cartels will go down, and what the cartels are doing in Mexico wouldn’t even be remotely possible in the USA, because you are not going to subdue an armed population (not to mention that neither the American government nor any european government would allow the cartels to have such power).

    To prove this point, Don Ajelo took down several cartels cumridden scumfucks http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2010/11/mexican-marines-reconstruct-death-of.html , now imagine what would happen if the entire population raised their firsts against the cartels shitbags.

    Here is the thing: the cartels need to die, but this is not going to happen as long as most Mexicans aren’t willing to fight back. because we know that the cartels in Mexico have state-like power, and most of the government is in cahoots with them (otherwise they wouldn’t have even a 1000th of the power they have), so a popular revolution is the only way, to get rid of the cartels and this criminal political class.

    They need to create a country where the rule of the law prevails and where the citizens can actually trust their government, a country where no criminal syndicates is more powerful than the state itself. And to achieve this goal, a massive bloodbath is required, there is no other solution.
    The cartels scumfucks would continue to ravage the country even if all drugs were legalized, they would just resort to human trafficking and the like, and they would increase their kidnapping activities.

    How do you think that rotten jizzbags who butchered people and skinned them alive will fit into society? They just have to be exterminated.


    In your article you talked about the rule of the law, but the rule of the law isn’t going to work where there is so much corruption.

    To establish the rule of the law, you need to get rid of the monsters who are ravaging the country first.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Revolutions always make things worse.

      Delete
  24. Impossible too much greed. Here's my OpinioN on your comment 1st stop consumption, how do u get rid of a commodity. 2nd better wages means bigger extortions, piso, fines,etc again greed humans are not satisfied with contempt majority hungers for more
    And that just my thought. 3rd Hold politicians accountable how and who's going to do it? Government? Politicians? Public ? Vatican? Cartels?U.S.? Here's the thing remember like in any history fixing the problem has no profit and doing too much good you will
    get wacked shot called by the elites .Listen boys girls ladies and gentlemen
    Mexico is another chess piece of the elites and there the true Narcos. It's controlled from top and if wanted bottom included. My Mexican folks you have power by strength in the numbers physical mental all around key is don't be a slave no more that goes from every level of your society Rise and open your eyes and keep them open use the gifts our heavenly father gave each and all make a change think globally act locally.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice input.
      However, I have to admit that the lower house of Congress passed a bill overwhelmingly that abolishes the impunity of any government official from prosecution ( including the president ). Hopefully passed by the upper house soon.
      Better wages is direly needed to combat the criminal behavioral practices which are factors why many partake.
      Do admit the masses of its citizens do outweigh those criminal / political powers which have inflicted the issues facing Mexico today. Nevertheless, I must incline against foreign governments to resolve owns issues due to profiting for certain incentives and not in the interests of its citizens.Greed has always been the culprit for many of these issues. Politcal and business investments have taken advantage of many to undermine its constituents with nothing.
      A practice called capitalism.

      E42

      Delete
  25. Popular revolution is what needs to happen in Mexico. The autodefensas groups are kicking the cartels asses, but there should be more of them http://time.com/5755/mexico-vigilantes-knights-templar-cartel-michoacan/

    Mexican citizens are much more than the cartels, if they fight back, the cartels will go down, and what the cartels are doing in Mexico wouldn’t even be remotely possible in the USA, because you are not going to subdue an armed population (not to mention that neither the American government nor any european government would allow the cartels to have such power).

    To prove this point, Don Ajelo took down several cartels cumridden scumfucks http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2010/11/mexican-marines-reconstruct-death-of.html , now imagine what would happen if the entire population raised their firsts against the cartels shitbags.

    Here is the thing: the cartels need to die, but this is not going to happen as long as most Mexicans aren’t willing to fight back. because we know that the cartels in Mexico have state-like power, and most of the government is in cahoots with them (otherwise they wouldn’t have even a 1000th of the power they have), so a popular revolution is the only way, to get rid of the cartels and this criminal political class.

    They need to create a country where the rule of the law prevails and where the citizens can actually trust their government, a country where no criminal syndicates is more powerful than the state itself. And to achieve this goal, a massive bloodbath is required, there is no other solution.
    The cartels scumfucks would continue to ravage the country even if all drugs were legalized, they would just resort to human trafficking and the like, and they would increase their kidnapping activities.

    How do you think that rotten jizzbags who butchered people and skinned them alive will fit into society? They just have to be exterminated.

    In your article you talked about the rule of the law, but it’s not possible to enforce the rule of the law when most of the government is ruled by the cartels. To establish the rule of the law you need to destroy the monsters who are ravaging the country first.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @8:06

      Yep. That’s the only thing that can work. But if you think that allowing the monsters who are running the country to continue without resistance will solve things, be my guest.

      Delete
    2. Revolution will open the gates of hell.

      Delete
    3. It can hardly become more hellish than now, where the country is run by psychopaths. To change things, to build a corruption free state, either a revolution or a fascist coup d’etat is needed.

      Period.

      Delete
  26. The fat black spider is the government, it is full of greed, and will sqeeze all the money,it can while in power. It also needs the criminal Cartels, which helps it, in strength. Anything you do yo the spider, won't kill it.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Holy crap. Anonymous. Couldve wrote his own article

    ReplyDelete
  28. Cartels are responsible for more than 50% of the Mexican economy. If you get rid of them the entire country will collapse.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not sure your numbers stack up, Mexico's legal exports are worth 290 billion dollars worth of goods annually, Pemex put 66 billion into the economy annually, drug trafficking is 30 billion dollars. Legal exports put 10 times more into the economy, and not all the drug traffickers money is laundered and paid tax on.

      Delete
    2. 4:48 popular revolutions get creamed a balazos or by economic blockades when nobody can get their hands on foods or toilet paper, ask Cuba or Venezuela and Chile how their popular revolutions are going...

      Delete
    3. Otis B Fly-Wheel, this is according to official figures. Real income is 4-6 times more.
      The Sinaloa cartel laundered 378 billion dollars in the bank of Wachovia from 2004 to 2007 year.
      The bank HSBC processed at least $881m in cash for Mexico's Sinaloa cartel. Western Union suspected of laundering $ 250 billion mexican cartels!
      who knows how much they earn...

      Delete
    4. Otis B Fly-Wheel, In addition the helping the banks, these gangs help certain industries and local businesses. The gangs have helped businesses selling luxury goods, such as cars, thrive because they use their money to buy such goods. As another example, a strip of very fancy boutiques in Zaponan has been thriving because of the drug cartels. Gang members have and continue to help many individuals and groups with their businesses in Mexico. Global Envision reported that “the loss of the drug business would shrink Mexico’s economy by 63 percent.” Others say that as much as 20% of Mexico’s GDP is a result of the drug cartels (in 2010-2011 years).

      Delete
    5. US Customs and Border Protection Americans spent $109 billion on illegal drugs according to a new study prepared by the RAND. Mexican cartels earn $ 30 billion out of $ 109 billion.
      This estimate could be low. According to a report in the International Business Times:
      An analysis of recent surveys and research studies places the size of the illegal U.S. drug market at $200 billion to $750 billion per year, with most estimates coming in between $400 billion and $500 billion (in 2013 year).
      The analysis was done by ConvergE Group, a global brokerage based in New York

      90% of the wholesale drug market in the US is controlled by Mexican cartels. 25-30% of the total income of drugs belongs to Mexican cartels

      Do the math and stop believing in this shit.

      Delete
    6. @3:28PM What is the point of your comment? What "shit" is that we are to quit believing? What does any of that have to do with this article? I made clear that the proposed solution was for cartel related homicides and had nothing to do with trafficking or using drugs.

      Delete
    7. @2:27PM Maybe Mexico needs to direct their economic growth plans to attract legal economic growth. I don't think a higher GDP and helping the banks and luxury car dealers is worth the price of the 200,000 murdered in the drug war.

      Delete
    8. 3:28
      That is NO WHERE near 50% of Mexico's economy.

      Delete
    9. @7:57 AM

      If you think that forcing the good guys to not do anything and endure what the cartels are king without retaliations is a good idea, i have to disagree. As long as those who are running the country aren’t replaced (and they won’t be replaced without violence), it will continue to be a shithole, where a solution to the problem of the drug cartel is impossibile because the government is in cahoots with them.

      A government run by the marina would be much better, they aren’t as corrupt as the rest. But they need help to do that, if the population starts a revolution then maybe the marina can make a coupe d’etat.

      Democracy is not going to solve shit in the current situation of Mexico. On the other hand, a revolution of the good guys can solve things. Look at what the autodefensas have done in many places, where they have built many “cartel free” zones.

      Delete
    10. 3:28 pm quote from you...US Costoms and Border Protection spent $109 billion on illegal drugs. Looks like your smoking a prohibited pipe.

      Delete
    11. There is never "good guys" in revolutions - that would cause more harm.

      Delete
    12. @ DD word
      @2:27 I would agree that 20% figure

      Delete
    13. @2:17 over what time period, we are talking about billions per year for GDP

      Delete
    14. 3:28 In spite of all that trillion dollars Mexican drug traffickers made, No gigantic Mexican bank has ever been fined for any money laundering, not at the top ten. Believe me...
      --RAND Corp is only inflating their usual BS to earn themselves one more Contract of another poor broke ass country from their country's government behind the backs of the American people they lord it over...

      Delete
    15. “ There is never "good guys" in revolutions - that would cause more harm.”

      Leaving things as they are is better, i suppose. And yes, there are the good guys, the autodefensas are good guys for example. A revolution would just be them having more power and men to rely on.

      Delete
    16. No one said leave things as they are. Autodefensas don't know jack about governing or politcs. They would soon get intoxicated with power.

      Delete
    17. How can the criminals who are running the country (both in the cartels and in the government) be overthrown if not with force? I say that a popular revolution is needed, and then the marines should take control of the government. They are the most trusted in the country and the less subjected to corruption. But as soon as the current psychopaths and criminals who are running the country aren’t overthrown, things won’t change.

      Delete
  29. People that join cartels as sicarios have no fucking respect for themselves their life or family neither their boss give fuck about them he has already other 10 poor young souls that are going to die for him only for 100$ a week
    No one from the drug lords respect their sicarios it doesn't matter if it's viceroy or chapo, t

    ReplyDelete
  30. People that join cartels as gunmen have zero respect toward their life or family even their boss sees them as cannon fodders and gives zero fuck about him as he still has +200 young poor people taking their lives for 80$ week. It doesn't matter how strong drug lord is, all the drug lords see their sicarios as cannon fodders take an example of OG Zeta Raul Alberto trejo benavide aka El Alvin he got injured during capturing of El Chacho dinosio (old nuevo laredo plaza owner) when Los Zetas stormed his residence in Monterrey 2002 May Osiel Cardenas Guillen didn't cared about him and left him dead in downtown hotel in matamoros abandoned by his men he died due to lack of medicine attention

    ReplyDelete
  31. Due to unstabity In Mexico, the end of this year, it may surpass, the 29,000 homicides of 2017. Running for president Obrador, wants Amesty for cartel members, that are in prison. Meaning he wants to set them free.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Meaning more deaths added to the current count. Advertising / welcoming its country’s destruction inevitably.
      As if there’s profit to be claimed from some sort of insurance claim among its citizens.

      Huge mistake!
      E42

      Delete
  32. Guliani drastically cut crime at the street level by targeting the common criminals there. I believe the strategy of targeting just the top guys is a failure and has actually made things worse by splintering the criminal groups and causing the sicarios to be supervised less. I would target the sicarios and shoot on site any who are armed, arrest the rest, hang the murderers and put the rest in prison camps at hard labor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 8:25
      Guliani did not do shit. It was the cheif of police, William Bratton, who put in the work yet Guliani is falsely given credit.

      Delete
  33. The answer is simple and staring you in the face when you cross the imaginary line between Mexico and Texas called a border. The common people are armed on one side, and not on the other. One side has peace and justice, the other, not.
    A well armed citizenry will slowly over time eliminate the criminal element and bring about spontaneous order. Those that live by the gun will die by the gun. The people like peace, law, and order, and that will become the new norm when every man is armed. Simply repeal the gun laws in Mexico and watch the place improve.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Public hanging showed on tv but with out the bags over the head. So all the dumbass kids can see what will happen to them if they become criminals. Or you could do it cartel style and cut the heads off with a small knife so it is really messy and brutal. Burn them alive like on the witch hunt days. Could do a lowering in to an acid bath feet first. Any other way is to mercyful

    ReplyDelete
  35. So you propose to let a government trusted by less than 10% of the population ‘to do the right thing’, exercise power of life and death over its people. Genius. I’m sure it will all be 100% guilty Narcos who are hung at these fabulous open carnivals of death.
    Instead of plunging a country further into barbarism and unjust murder how about legalizing drugs, regulating, and so removing the huge incentive for these cartels to exist.
    More murder will not solve Mexico’s problems.

    ReplyDelete
  36. If the Cartels and criminals have guns, then by golly let the innocent citizens carry weapons, for self defense.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com