Thursday, January 25, 2018

Secretary of tourism proposes recreational marijuana for BCS and QRoo, states with increase in homicides

Translated by El Profe for Borderland Beat from Animal Politico
                         
                        turismo

The tourism official said that legalizing marijuana would help not to lose these centers for the fight against drug trafficking.

Legalizing marijuana in Baja California Sur and Quintana Roo in order to prevent violence driving away tourism, was the idea launched Thursday by the Secretary of Tourism, Enrique de la Madrid.

"It is absurd that as a country we do not already take that step. I would like to see that, what could be done in Baja California Sur and Quintana Roo, the two main tourist destinations in Mexico that do not have to be victims of violence," the official told reporters in Mexico City.

De la Madrid gives examples of what was done in California, where the recreational use of the substance is legal, although at the federal level, the United States maintains the prohibition.

"It would be a huge damage to lose those destinations due to drug trafficking issues. I believe that making legal not only the consumption but the production and sale of marijuana would contribute, along with other actions, to have more secure destinations," he said.

Mexico has already taken a first step, after the medical and scientific use of marijuana was approved in April of last year.

Uncontrollable Violence

In 2017 there were 25,339 murders in Mexico, and although it is not known how many of these are related to drug trafficking, the increase of this crime in these tourist centers is notable.

With a rate of 50.5 malicious homicides, the level of violence in the state already exceeds that of Sinaloa, Chihuahua and Baja California.

Between 2013 and 2017, intentional homicides in Baja California Sur increased 1,000%, going from 56 to 560. Each year the figure grew, being 56 in 2013, 70 in 2014, 151 in 2015, 192 in 2016 and 560 in 2017

In Quintana Roo there were 214 murders of this type in 2013, 172 in 2014, 228 in 2015, 165 in 2016 and 359 in 2017, according to the criminal statistics of the National Security Executive Secretariat.

According to the National Survey of Victimization and Perception of Public Safety (ENVIPE) 2017, in Baja California Sur 60.3% of the population aged 18 and over considers insecurity as the most important problem that afflicts the state today, followed by drug trafficking and corruption.

And the situation has not changed at the beginning of the year, since on the night of January 6, a clash between gunmen and federal and state armed forces left seven dead in San José del Cabo. While on December 20, six bodies were found hanging from three bridges, an unprecedented event in this state.

Businessmen have already demanded security

Meanwhile, last June businessmen and hoteliers in Cancun demanded that the state and federal governments reinforce the security program, through coordination, to avoid confrontations.

Eloy Peniche, president of the Business Coordinating Council of Cancun, explained that the area represents one of the largest tourist revenues for the country and 35 percent of the remittances that Mexico receives.

The businessmen requested that federal and state authorities work in coordination to prevent organized crime cells from taking over the area.

39 comments:

  1. Excellent, let the truth be known.

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  2. Its like he thinks ,as long as we can get high it don't matter if the bullets fly . Do ya think marijuana is that addictive ?

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  3. All the states in Mexico should have recreational marijuana use. Why only these two?
    Maybe then stupid people can much like when prohibition was over indulge themselves in another permitable drug and just maybe stop trying new more powerful ones like crack and cocaine. But this might be asking to much of the current as well as future generation of idiots. Hell even here in the states that might be asking to much???

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  4. 1. At least Mexico now recognizes the US is way out in front when it comes to legalization. 2) And now Mexico recognizes that a lot of violence in Mexico is related to local retail (narcomenudeo) drug sales, not related to trafficking to the US. 3. Don't delude yourself into thinking it's all foreign tourists buying these drugs locally, and don't delude yourself into thinking the market is limited to harmless ole weed. Thousands of local Mexicans in these tourist locales are using meth and coke. 4. Are they going to legalize the extortion and kidnapping that is a big part of the violence in these tourist zones?

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    1. Legalizaton for Taxation will fix nothing anywhere, the bitching over the "access" to the money collected by taxing will always set gangs of politicians sicarios after each otber, and when you involve "peniches" in banking, government contracts, mafioso drug traffickers, "law making" and shit, you are asking for some more ass kicking from the mulas in government...
      --Fack the Peniches.

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    2. I live here in one of the tourist areas...and we dont have kidnappings or extorsion...only the phone kind and you're an idiot if you go for that. As far as fighting over an area for consumption, I think that is the smaller aspect of it. Ours is a trampoline port so very important that the fight has been over the plaza due to that, not so much for the consumption, though there is that too. As far as blaming the consumption on tourists - the expensive drugs are for the tourists and the cheap - meth - is consumed by locals. So there's a market for both and blame for both. But the foreigners spend the big bucks. As soon as they get off the plane they start to ask for it. THAT is a problem...the local consumption by foreigners.

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  5. Sadly in many parts of Mexico Marijuana is still demonized at the level of heroin or meth.
    Specially in lockland cities like Monterrey. I told a person a year ago that I had legal Marijuana in the US. He looked at me shocked, like if i was some kind of lost drug addicted junkie was surprised how i wasn't "addicted" or had OD.
    Funny thing is that he's one of the typical hispanic alcoholic who drinks every day and gets into "domestic" violence and some other lovely perks of using alcohol.
    Of course alcohol is not a "drug" because of simple cultural engineering.

    Mexico could use more rastafari/hippies smoking, doing shrooms, ayahuasca, etc.
    I bet a lot of these egocentric violent drug lords would cone out really humble after an ayahuasca session and switching to weed over cocaine and Buchanans.

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    1. I agree with the 1st statement you put. When I ask my cousins (Coke Users) or my uncles/aunties in Mexico if they like weed, their reaction is the same like asking someone if they like meth.

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    2. I have friends like that too. Cannabis is a totally different drug to alcohol and other hard drugs. I have a few friends that all use coke and drink heavily and have all had a lot to say about my smoking it for pain relief. Its a relaxant, you chat and are sociable after a joint, my alcoholic ex friend is vile and aggressive after a binge drink, ready to fight anyone! I'm happy to leave them too it!

      Legalising cannabis worldwide would offer those that do use it, sell it, grow it a chance to live a legal life. The taxes raised could be used to focus on dealing and prosecuting the traffickers and street dealers of heavy drugs. Even the police here (UK) seem to feel that simple possession and small time dealing/growing is a waste of their time. If police raids find a small grow (3-4plants) they usually just remove the plants and give a caution, they leave the equipment most of the time as well. They don't take such a laid back approach to hard drugs though, which I thinks fair.

      If it frees up police resources and let's them focus on trafficking and the violence its got to be worth trying.

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    3. 2.00 dollars a day minimum wages sure is a factor on the illegal weed market, pinchi gente pendeja, and sure, we will go running to the authorized Mexican dispensaries to buy overpriced weed just because legalization has been gifted to mexicans, by a bunch of greedy bank robbing family scions.
      People don't have bus fare, but will gladly hitch a raid to Cancún to buy legal weed, Dios mio, mejor matame ya!

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    4. 8:15 - Over priced legal cannabis that is WAAAAY better then the usual Mexican dirt weed you'd get on the black market.

      Phelpso

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    5. Tho I prefer coca and Buchanan’s I do think weed is medical and should be legalized

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    6. What Psychedelics drugs do to you is slap you in the face and shows you the Truth right in your own eyes. Mexico needs to take one of those drugs called revolution

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    7. 10:39 i don't do grifa,
      i won't even to bed your ass,
      i think mariguana addicts are asquerosos or asquerosas

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  6. Chivis by any chance do you have a link to the picture of a party in the sierra where theres this dude riding a quad with a girl behind him, and on the background a bunch of dudes talking on walkies and carrying rifles. Im interestes on what went down in that photo. Arw they still alive and what group did they belong to?

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    1. No seas Mamon y ponte a chambiar

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    2. 2:00 Chivis I love it when you wear Freddy Krugger's knife gloves to scratch estos mamones on the cabooses.

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  7. I don't think it will change the violence in any way only this time more money will go into the treasury maybe to fight other crime??The plaza will still be sold to all 3 or 4 of all the bidders as there's also other things to sell besides pot.The criminals are not going to suddenly leave.That 's a joke.

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    1. 11:28 the mexican government will never use increased earnings from taxes or whatever in fighting crime, but beleeve me, they already know what banks will be taking their extra deposits.

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  8. Alcohol is a drug. And a bad one

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  9. puff puff give!!! i think thats a great idea. Cartels could swtich month to month and sell thier best.

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  10. We need to be Postive thst Mexico will change to the Good

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    1. 5:08 nobody needs to be positive after 200 years of solitude

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  11. For tourists to come back to mexico, is Safety. Safety First. And make Mexico great. Mexico has the greatest People in the world

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    1. The tourists will be back try not to loose hope. Holidays to mexico used to be incredibly expensive but the price is falling dramatically. With that will come tourists who are not as well off but still have money to spend. We went to Cuba, Cayo coco a few years back, out of season for less than we could go to Spain. We got a bargain which meant that we were still able take lots of goods for the locals and tip well while we were there.

      There's plenty of people who haven't got the means to afford expensive holidays that will jump at the chance to visit mexico once its a bit safer or that the main travel companies drop the price a bit.

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    2. Enjoy, I am not going, fack tourism and fack the Mexican government, they are the only ones that make coin off tourism

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    3. agree...i feel safer here than in the US. US citizens are attacked everywhere - even / especially at home. They should feel safe here....foreigners are not the targets when it come to the drug violence.

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    4. Well at 8:19 I make my living in tourism and I dont work for the government. If you dont like it here, we dont want you here. You're free to go anywhere you like - and good luck with that friendly attitude!! I always wonder when I travel to the states why there are so many angry people living there - they should stay in their homeland and live the dream there. As you should.

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    5. i am boycotting mexico for the last 40 years, i didn't leave because it was the best place in the world, and i am happy wherever i at, would be happy in mexico too, but not happenin' not this year anyway

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  12. If you're looking to enjoy legal weed on your holiday, California is waaaaaaaaay better

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  13. That would be great.

    Last time I went to San Lucas, I was offered "mota" 43 times in just 8 hours.

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    1. 1:43 you were lucky,
      if i offer once and you don't buy,
      you will be in very deep shit, honey.

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  14. Good article on weed smuggling

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/wjp97w/i-helped-smuggle-more-than-27-tons-of-pot-in-three-nights

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  15. I’m pro-legalization but he is delusional if he thinks that legalizing marijuana will decrease violence in those states. The violence is more driven by hard drugs (Heroin, coke, meth, etc.), as well as extortion, kidnappjngs, etc. Legalizing marijuana isn’t going to stop this. But it would bring revenue and jobs to those states. Unfortunately it also means those businesses would either be extorted by the cartels or outright owned by the cartels. Because extortion has become a fact of life in QRoo, etc.

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  16. there was a shootout in nuevo laredo next to mayor speech http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/estados/video-balacera-interrumpe-evento-de-alcalde-de-nuevo-laredo
    i hope u public this chivis

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    1. 5:51 fack el alcalde de nuevo laredo, y que me empinen a sus pinchis escoltas.

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  17. You can score on the beach down in cabo anywhere, just ask one of the beach vendors. The guys that sell sunglasses usually got the best stuff

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    1. You can get pot anywhere in Cabo...and elsewhere. well maybe not the middle east, I dont know about that.

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