Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Mexico, about to break all records of murders in 2017

Posted by DD material from el Pais and Mexico News Daily



Nearly 50 killed in weekend of violence

Mexico News Daily reported a spate of armed attacks across several states left close to 50 people dead over the weekend, further adding to an already alarmingly high 2017 death toll that is likely to make this year Mexico’s most violent of the past two decades.


Guerrero saw the worst of it: 17 homicides occurred in the state where where six of the victims were found in a clandestine grave in Acapulco. The other 11 fatalities were caused by shootings in both the port city and other municipalities including Técpan de Galeana and Alcholoa.

Sixteen people were killed in Baja California Sur on Friday and Saturday including a one-year-old infant who was caught in the crossfire in an attack at a restaurant in the state capital La Paz. It brought the number of people killed in the state last week to 35.


 A further seven murders were recorded in the northern border state of Chihuahua.

Counted among the dead were three bullet-riddled bodies found in the back of an abandoned pick-up truck with New Mexico license plates in the municipality of Riva Palacio.  Based on their clothing the victims were believed to be members of the Mennonite community.



 Another two people were shot dead at a party in Ciudad Juárez.

 In San Luis Potosí, the owner of a cantina in the state capital found two people dead when he arrived to clean the venue at approximately 11:30am yesterday, police reported.

 Violence also hit the border city of Tijuana in Baja California.

Attacks on a bar in the downtown area and a seafood restaurant in the southeast of the city left four dead and 10 wounded, according to the municipal Secretariat of Public Security. The perpetrator of the bar attack was arrested and taken into custody.

A 22-year-old man was also fatally wounded by gunfire in Tlalnepantla, México state.

The wave of violence over the weekend added to a record high death toll that is set to exceed Mexico’s previous annual record, registered in 2011 when former President Felipe Calderón was waging a war against drug cartels.

El Pais reported in the first nine months of this year, 18,505 homicides were recorded, according to statistics from the Interior Secretariat. The figure equates to more than 68 murders per day, six higher than the 62 per day recorded in 2011.

Several months and quarters of 2017 have been among Mexico’s most violent in the last 20 years including record high numbers for intentional homicides in May that was promptly relegated to second place after even higher numbers were recorded in June.

Rising crime has also affected popular tourist destinations including Los Cabos, Baja California Sur and Cancún, Quintana Roo, leading the United States Department of State to issue an updated travel warning in August.

With just over two months until the end of 2017, this year is set to become not only the bloodiest in President Enrique Peña Nieto’s six-year term but also the most violent since records were made publicly available in 1997.


 Not even in the cruelest years of the war against drug trafficking were recorded such high homicide figures as those that have endured this 2017 . In the first nine months of the year, according to figures released by the Mexican Ministry of the Interior, up to 18,505 felony homicides - more than 68 a day - were counted. So far, Mexico's deadliest year had been 2011, in full open battle against drug lords, a time when corpses filled the front pages of national newspapers. These nine months have, however, exceeded that dark stage and, according to the figures, everything points to become one of the most violent years in its history.

The first public data on the Executive Secretariat's page on homicides is from 1997. From January to September of that year, there were 12,504 victims. That number has risen mercilessly to the 62 killed a day in 2011 . Many then believed that violence in the country had hit the ceiling.

The following year, 2012, the figure relaxed a bit: almost 1,000 fewer victims. And in 2013, almost 3,000 less. It was from 2015 when numbers began to rise. In 2016, the violence was about to go back to the one that lived the deadly 2011. And began to jump the alarms.

In May this year, the national press warned that it was the deadliest month in two decades . And, the following month, a new consecutive record was broken with 43 more victims. The increase was also reflected in the number of kidnappings. In September they have risen to 866 in just nine months, 70 more than the same period last year.

A year ago, it was with concern that 2016 had become the most violent year since four years when President Enrique Peña Nieto took office in the government. But given the figures of the first nine months of this, the horizon is even darker. Mexico is 90 days from crossing the goal of the most violent year since records were made available.  

40 comments:

  1. Great news, you made my day........sigh

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why get serious just get happy. They seem to like it

      Delete
    2. Just WHAT is that supposed to mean ?
      Who LIKES this ?

      Delete
    3. @9:44
      Rather a dilemma!
      What’s worse?
      The fear of living or the fear of not living!

      E42

      Delete
    4. 5:58 who likes this shit?
      @9:44 sure does, never misses a chance to express his joy, mexican murders makes his ass sooo happpy!

      Delete
    5. The media likes it. It sells. The politicians in Mexico like it. It keeps the attention focused in the direction they want and keeps the funds from around the world pouring in. If you are a career politician, activist, social-justice-warrior, etc, then you NEED sensational stuff, and nothing says sensational like sex and/or lots of dead people. That's why people compare them to the other bottom-feeders, lawyers. The overwhelming majority of people are not morbidly happy to see innocent people in Mexico die... just these truly evil bad guys. We're tired of seeing the courageous lives of innocent people snuffed out. Yes... when bad guys die, we are happy. Period. We're tired of the endless supply of empathy for these heartless butchers. No more dollars to fund "rehabilitation" for career criminals. No more life in prison on our dime. More death penalty, less crime.

      Delete
    6. That is at least a real comment, thank you.

      Delete
    7. 12:25 you are sponsoring indiscriminate murdering of more mexicans without laws or trials to support that BS.
      All that does is murder more innocents to expedite the inflated scalp count, there is about half a million deaths in mexico while drug trafficking only intensified, court martial with extreme prejudice the leaders of the wars on drugs for their failures, not the unarmed exploited and abused catpive slave laborers in mexico.

      Delete
    8. Used to go to Mexico, an all too familiar phrase I hear from people.

      Delete
  2. I call Mexico, the wild west, you can kill anyone anytime and get away with it. Stats state they only investigate 10 percent of the crimes.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Mexico is so strange. On one hand the people are so laid back and keep to themselves but on the other hand like scobby said, it's the wild west. The country has a lot of potential for business on the global stage, I don't see why they don't pour resources into solidifying law enforcement to be real for once and for all, but I'll answer that question. I think Mexicans even the good Mexicans are corrupt and/or easily corrupted.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Humans are extremely corrupted. Expand your horizons and youll learn that what goes on in Mex is tame or similar to other countries and I cant stress enough this point.

      Delete
    2. 9:10; The places in Mexico where there is international investment, people with money, and powerful people and good EDUCATED government Mexico is as functional as any American city. There are geographically small portions of Mexico that are "the wild west" as you call it and where they do not have educated or well trained law enforcement. But lets keep it real...this is a small part of Mexico in certain areas where there are strategic hubs for drug trafficking and along the border.
      Lets just keep it real!
      Dwight

      Delete
  4. Mexico and Chicago deserve a real congratulations. That's something to be proud of. Congrats to the Mayor of Chicago and President of Mexico

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 9:42 mexico and chicago, were imposed the extreme version of the 2nd ammendment by the weapons merchants of the world, ladden with impunity for their illegal weapons sales to no less than the worst gangbangers and drug dealers in the world, of course, shit is needed to move merchandise all over mexico and it needs defense from tumbadores, both sides helped by corrupt police and military in charge of selectively enforcing "DA' LAW".
      --Chicago's mayor Retchie Daley even imposed the law of his güebos, to ban weapons, their illegal sales and tried to sue the dealers for the crimes.committed with their illegally sold weapons only to be overturned by the federal government bought and paid for by the NRA and their masters.
      --Mexico was fed operations Wide Receiver and Fast and Furious Mayan Jaguar, and even the 50 year old "Operacion Condor" from which all the Latin American banana republics' crimes against humanity emanate, the US even installed their own murdering School of the Americas in guatermala to pay their mastiffs in pesos and quetzales junk currency, because in dollars it gets real expensive...

      Delete
    2. BS... blame the US. Here we go again. Face it.. Mexico is a war zone.

      Delete
  5. Sad Mexico has become a war zone with no end insight

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mexico hasn't become a war zone and in fact most of Mexico is safe and functioning well. There are unstable areas that make up a very small part of Mexico.
      Lets just keep it real.
      Dwight

      Delete
  6. Eight people were murdered in one night in Ensenada last weekend. The bodies of six men and two women were nude and dumped in different parts of the city. All were abducted from a "picadero."

    ReplyDelete
  7. HOW MUCH SALARY 500$?

    ReplyDelete
  8. So what precipitated such a sharp increase in deaths? Chapo?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 10:18 evidently, if Chapo is not there,
      It follows that the lack of Chapo is the reason of the violence,
      I am sure alfredo beltran leyva, la barbie and la chapa would have peace in mexico it would be good for mexicans and the US, but "businessmen" would be losing billions of dollars in cash and opportunities.

      Delete
  9. Time to just overthrow the government

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 11:48 Uncle Sam would not be happy about it,
      better watch your step and don't step on the crap.

      Delete
  10. Anyone who has ever lived in Mexico knows that information and statistics published by the government are not reliable. Add 15-20% to those totals for unreported or unrecorded incidents.

    Meanwhile, in the US:

    http://www.insightcrime.org/news-analysis/greatest-drug-threat-united-states-homegrown-dea-report

    ReplyDelete
  11. The figures are 20x this I bet. One of my friends since childhood was kindapped along with some other guy down in a small town in Michoacan. They found them dead last week. There was not even anything on the news or online about it. From what I hear its almost a weekly thing that happens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very sorry to hear that. Journalists trying to report are in the crosshairs too.

      Delete
  12. Colonialism is alive and well in Mexico. It actually never ended. The conquistadores simply bred with the natives ( whom, some, already historically had a penchant for killing and sacrifice). The killing has never stopped. Compound those bloodlines with the instant gratification of the last 20 years and throw in some mind numbing drugs and you have one hell of a volatile situation! Such a beautiful country with some really sincere beautiful people, literally some of the most kind people in the world, but the other half not so much. I truthfully see nothing but ruin for the country. Remaining silent is as harmful as pulling the trigger. The sicarios should also not be allowed to join the local,municipal, state and federal police forces. How sad does that sound, but so true.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not to be snide, but do you know the definition of colonialism? Mexico is a lot of things, but where is a shred of evidence that it's colonial.

      Secondly, carnal, do some research before making sweeping statements.
      Yes, Mexico is pretty violent and getting more so.
      But there are 24 nations with a higher homicide rate.
      This is according to the U.N.
      Honduras, El Salvador, Venezuela, Lesotho (in Africa) top the list. Homicides a expressed as per 100,000.
      When you talk about the world, you neglected to mention that the Muslim nations are at whole new level of violence, what with full scale wars, acts of terrorism, bombings and sectarian hatred.
      And let's not forget the US of A.
      We have a full scale opioid crisis and random acts of mass homicide.
      Keep Mexico in perspective and you'll be more intellectually honest.

      Delete
    2. well said Ricardo

      Delete
  13. Intellectually honest? I'll tell you what, you keep quoting UN statistics and I'll guarantee that Mexico will not be any better for it? I spent 6 years there witnessing the carnage first hand. I have also been visiting the country for over 40 years. I do have a valid perspective, it may not be found in your scholarly statistics of intellectual honesty but it is nonetheless honest. To suggest that Spain's intrusion into Mexico has not caused unfair equity in modern day Mexico is not worth justifying a conversation. Your defensiveness of your heritage is understandable but again it will do nothing to solve any of Mexico's current problems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you okay?
      You just went off on a crazy rant, cited anecdotal information and personal impressions. What do they mean? Pretty much nothing.
      Just yesterday, eight people were slaughtered by a crazy Muslim in NYC.
      Now, does that mean that violence is out of control in the U.S.? This sort of thing does not happen in Mexico.
      Again, do your homework and it will keep you intellectually honest.

      Delete
    2. One has to resort to intellectual rigor if you are going to discuss complex situations coherently. Basing an argument on personal experience and impressions is by any standard of little value. The U.N. may not suit you, but their stats have not been disputed.
      Now take a deep breath and relax

      Delete
    3. When your disillusionment occurs you will be better for it. The last time I checked dealing drugs was not that complicated, really? Furthermore cite one example of the UN helping any complex drug situation in Mexico? I sense you are the type who likes to take the scholarly higher ground route? Hopefully it works for you because it surely doesn't seem to be for your mother land.

      Delete
  14. which restaurant in tj? or did i miss the name?

    ReplyDelete
  15. I just spent ~10 days riding a motorcycle in Nuevo Leon and further south. Zero issues... only kind, generous, welcoming people. Those that think cartel members are hiding behind every curve ready to get you - would be pleasantly surprised.

    ReplyDelete
  16. For clarity I'm an American with limited Spanish skills... zero encounters that were a concern. I'm ready to head back to a lovely country.

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com