Saturday, August 26, 2017

New US Travel Warning Includes 15 Municipalities in Sinaloa

Translated by Yaqui for Borderland Beat from Riodoce


Additional Material: Whnt
Aug 24, 2017

The United States Department of State has recommended not to travel to 15 of Sinaloa's 18 municipalities, because of the risk of "activities of criminal organizations in those areas. The shootings between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place in streets and public spaces in broad daylight," the statement said. The only unconstrained Sinaloa towns are Mazatlán, Los Mochis and Topolobampo.



Come to Mazatlan, Everything is Cool here.


Sinaloa (includes Mazatlan): One of Mexico’s most powerful criminal organizations is based in the state of Sinaloa, and violent crime rates remain high in many parts of the state. Defer non-essential travel to the state of Sinaloa, except the cities of Mazatlan, Los Mochis, and the Port of Topolobampo. Travel in Mazatlan should be limited to Zona Dorada, the historic town center, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport. Travel in Los Mochis and Topolobampo is restricted to the city and the port, as well as direct routes to/from these locations and the airport.

Note the Proximity of Culiacan, Los Mochis, Mazatlan and Topo to BCS
The Travel Alert, which replaces the one issued on December 8, also includes the municipalities of Coahuila (except Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal and Parras de la Fuente); Numerous locations in the State of Mexico; The Jalisco areas bordering Michoacan and Zacatecas; Michoacán (except Morelia and Lázaro Cárdenas); Some areas of Morelos; And the entire state of Tamaulipas.


In these areas, it is specified that US officials and their families are prohibited from traveling, and US citizens are asked to "avoid any non-essential travel."

In the Travel Alert, which replaces the one issued on December 8, 2016, it establishes restrictions regarding travel and safety conditions for Baja California, Baja California Sur, Chiapas, Colima, Guerrero, Quintana Roo and Veracruz.

Although the restrictions are for its personnel in our country, it is called that "emphatically the citizens of the United States to read the Travel Alert in its entirety."

The note also specifies that US officials are prohibited from "frequenting adult clubs and gambling establishments" in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, Jalisco, Colima, and Nayarit.

The U.S. State Department has issued a warning for Americans planning to travel to Mexico. Americans have been victims of violent crimes, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking and robbery in various Mexican states.



U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which the Department recommends “defer non-essential travel” in this Travel Warning. Employees are also not allowed to go to adult clubs or gambling establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, Jalisco, Colima, and Nayarit.

The State Department also warns that citizens have been murdered in carjackings and highway robberies. Those happen most often at night and on isolated roads. The carjackers are using roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles and running vehicles off the road.

Kidnappings in Mexico take the following forms:

Traditional:  victim is physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.

Express:  victim is abducted for a short time and commonly forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.

Virtual:  an extortion-by-deception scheme where a victim is contacted by phone and coerced by threats of violence to provide phone numbers of family and friends, and then isolated until the ransom is paid.  Recently, hotel guests have been targets of such “virtual” kidnapping schemes.

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups. U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel. 

In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them. You should cooperate at all checkpoints.

State-by-State Assessment: Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico. Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, U.S. citizens should exercise caution throughout Mexico as crime and violence can still occur. For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.

Aguascalientes: Intercity travel at night is prohibited for U.S. government personnel.

Baja California (includes Tijuana, Rosarito, Ensenada, Tecate, and Mexicali): Exercise caution in the northern state of Baja California, particularly at night. Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state of Baja California experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. 

While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring innocent bystanders have occurred during daylight hours. Due to poor cellular service and general road conditions, U.S. government personnel are only allowed to travel on “La Rumarosa” between Mexicali-Tijuana on the toll road during daylight hours.

New La Paz Malecon Icon
Baja California Sur (includes Los Cabos and La Paz): Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. Exercise caution as Baja California Sur continues to experience a high rate of homicides.

According to Secretaría de Seguridad Pública del Estado de Baja California and Secretaría de Gobernación statistics, the state of Baja California Sur experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016.

Puerto Cabo San Lucas
While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured, have occurred during daylight hours.

Campeche: No advisory is in effect.

Chiapas (includes Palenque and San Cristobal de las Casas): U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation.

Chihuahua (includes Ciudad Juarez, the city of Chihuahua, Ojinaga, Palomas, Nuevo Casas Grandes and Copper Canyon): Criminal activity and violence remains an issue throughout the state of Chihuahua and its major cities. If you plan to drive in the state of Chihuahua, you should limit travel to daylight hours on major highways and follow the recommendations below.

Ciudad Juarez: Exercise caution in all areas. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling after dark west of Eje Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. Defer non-essential travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region.

Within the city of Chihuahua: Defer non-essential travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts, where the travel of U.S. government personnel is restricted.

Ojinaga: Travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas port-of-entry.

Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: Use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico port-of- entry. Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling outside of city limits after dark.

Copper Canyon and other areas of the state of Chihuahua: U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel.

Coahuila: U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to Coahuila, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente, because of the high incidence of violent crime, particularly along the highways between Piedras Negras and Nuevo Laredo. State and municipal law enforcement capacity is limited in some parts of Coahuila, particularly in the north. U.S. government personnel are allowed to travel during daylight hours to Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente, using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

Colima (includes Manzanillo): U.S. government personnel are prohibited from intercity travel at night, from traveling within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoacán border, and from traveling on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border. U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to this border region, including the city of Tecoman.

Durango: Violence and criminal activity along the highways are a continuing security concern. U.S. government personnel may travel outside of the city of Durango only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of Durango.

The State de Mexico (includes Toluca and Teotihuacan): U.S. citizens should defer all non-essential travel to the municipalities of Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco, Solidaridad, Chalco, Ixtapaluca, and Tlatlaya due to high rates of crime and insecurity, unless traveling directly through the areas on major thoroughfares. Avoid traveling on any roads between Huitzilac, Morelos, and Santa Martha, the State de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Guanajuato (includes San Miguel de Allende and Leon): No advisory is in effect.

Guerrero (includes Acapulco, Ixtapa, Taxco, and Zihuatanejo): Personal travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco, is prohibited for U.S. government personnel. Self-defense groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Armed members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and, although not considered hostile to foreigners or tourists, are suspicious of outsiders and should be considered volatile and unpredictable.

Hidalgo: No advisory is in effect.

Jalisco (includes Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, and Lake Chapala): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to areas that border the states of Michoacán and Zacatecas because of continued instability. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from personal travel to areas of Jalisco that border Zacatecas, intercity travel after hours, and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta. U.S. government personnel are authorized to use Federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City; however, they may not stop in the town of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

Mexico City (formerly known as the Federal District): No advisory is in effect.

Michoacan (includes Morelia): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to the state of Michoacan, except the cities of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas, and the area north of federal toll road 15D. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling by land in Michoacan except on federal toll road 15D during daylight hours. Flying into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas is permitted for U.S. government personnel.

Morelos (includes Cuernavaca): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel on any roads between Huitzilac in the northwest corner of the state and Santa Martha, the State of Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Nayarit (includes the Riviera Nayarit coast, including the cities of Tepic, Xalisco, and San Blas): U.S. government personnel may travel to Riviera Nayarit, San Blas, Santa María del Oro, Tepic, and Xalisco using major highways. Intercity travel at night is prohibited for U.S. government personnel. Defer non-essential travel to other areas of the state.

Nuevo Leon (includes Monterrey): U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of Monterrey only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the municipal boundaries of San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river). Travel to and from Monterrey airport is permitted at any time.

Oaxaca (includes Oaxaca, Huatulco, and Puerto Escondido): U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation in Oaxaca City. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco, and they are not permitted to travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla: No advisory is in effect.

Queretaro: No advisory is in effect.

Another Day at Playa del Carmen 
Quintana Roo (includes Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya, and Tulum): U.S. citizens should be aware that according to Government of Mexico statistics, the state of Quintana Roo experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured or killed, have occurred.

San Luis Potosi: U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of San Luis Potosi only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of San Luis Potosi.



Sinaloa (includes Mazatlan): One of Mexico’s most powerful criminal organizations is based in the state of Sinaloa, and violent crime rates remain high in many parts of the state. Defer non-essential travel to the state of Sinaloa, except the cities of Mazatlan, Los Mochis, and the Port of Topolobampo. Travel in Mazatlan should be limited to Zona Dorada, the historic town center, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport. Travel in Los Mochis and Topolobampo is restricted to the city and the port, as well as direct routes to/from these locations and the airport.

Sonora (includes Nogales, Puerto Peñasco, Hermosillo, and San Carlos):Sonora is a key region in the international drug and human trafficking trades. U.S. citizens traveling throughout Sonora are encouraged to limit travel to main roads during daylight hours and exercise caution on the Highway 15 corridor from Nogales to Empalme. Puerto Peñasco should be visited using the Lukeville, Arizona/Sonoyta, Sonora border crossing, and limit driving to daylight hours.


Zona Dorada Mazatlan, Sinaloa
Due to illegal activity, U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to:

The triangular region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and north of Caborca (including the towns of Saric, Tubutama, and Altar). The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).

South of Hermosillo, with the exception of the cities of Alamos, Guaymas, and Empalme.  Defer non-essential travel east of Highway 15, within the city of Ciudad Obregon, and south of the city of Navojoa.

Tabasco (includes Villahermosa): No advisory is in effect.

Tamaulipas (includes Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, and Tampico): U.S. citizens should defer all non-essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas due to violent crime, including homicide, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault. The number of reported kidnappings in Tamaulipas is among the highest in Mexico. State and municipal law enforcement capacity is limited to nonexistent in many parts of Tamaulipas. Violent criminal activity occurs more frequently along the northern border and organized criminal groups may target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas. These groups sometimes take all passengers hostage and demand ransom payments.  U.S. government personnel are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m. Matamoros, Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo, and Ciudad Victoria have experienced numerous gun battles and attacks with explosive devices in the past year.

Tlaxcala: No advisory is in effect.

Veracruz: U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation. Road travel should be limited to daylight hours only.

Yucatan (includes Merida and Chichen Itza): No advisory is in effect.

Zacatecas: U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of Zacatecas only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of Zacatecas.

56 comments:

  1. Fuck the list keeps growing of dangerous places in Mexico

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  2. Bad business for the Mexican economy.Doubt that the Mexican government can eradicate such unwanted violence and bring tourists back.

    E42

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  3. Just got back from Mazatlan and most of Durango. Everything Relaxxx.. Especially DGO. Same every summer cerveza, banda, mariscos & FUN💯

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    1. Yea, I went to la feria de Santiago, la feria de Dgo and spent a few days in Mazatlan and everything was relax. Even my cousins said it has calmed down a lot in Dgo.

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    2. Yup I as well for several ferias in DGO. It has been really calm for the last 3-5yrs in DGO. Killings still happened but its between them and not that often. No one is being killed off just b/c they r getting the okay from up above(green light) The city of Durango real chill. I've left really late in the AM from there to othere towns away only one on highway no issues several times (partying/wasted) Relax

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    3. Did you go say hello to Armando corral. thank him for bringing the zetas to Durango.

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    4. 8:03, 9:41, 6:51. Yes life is safe from Durango DGO, El Salto DGO, Mazatlan SIN, y norte in Culiacan. Life is tranquil for people who mind business of their own. Most people of Mexico are good and most cities of Mexico are safe.

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  4. Department recommends “defer non-essential travel” in this Travel Warning. Employees are also not allowed to go to adult clubs or gambling establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, Jalisco, Colima, and Nayarit. My or My what will some white people do when they visit MEXICO Sex,Drugs,Gambling,ETC! is their life.

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    Replies
    1. The expression is "my oh my" not my or my

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    2. Of course! There's Lotteria! All those same activities and ambiance under one roof; El Boracho, La Botella and El Sol but in a safe setting. Enjoy......

      E42

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  5. But But sinaloa cartel does not kill innocent people

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    Replies
    1. They are killing each other.
      Wtf are you talking about m

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  6. Yet I, thought nuthuggers keep saying CDS controlled areas are all peaceful and safe??? Just another article that proces this is BS!!! Everyone of those nuthuggers that lives in the U.S. should travel to Sinaloa and Southern Chihuas at night and let us know how it goes!
    I, travel Juarez at night except for the Valley of it where CDS thrives and I'm still here!

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    1. im in culiacan for vacation at the moment everything is fine i mean i ate tacos around 3 in the morning last night and i didnt get shot lol not everyone in sinaloa is dedicated to selling drugs or illicit stuff the people here are really humble.

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    2. Sinaloa is pretty safe as long as your not involved in the business. I always go out there with my family every year. As a matter of fact I just recently came back and we drove out there in a new Nisan 2016 n let me tell u nothing happened. It's like any other state or city you have violence. Echelen ganas compas, puro mazatlan compas.
      -💯

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    3. So CDS wasn't killing all of Damasos men in Sinaloa? No duh the numbers will go up. You people just love to bitch

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    4. ive lived in cln since 2012 everything is calm here. no 1 dies without a reason everythin is controlled

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  7. Surprised that such ALERT ADVISORIES were applied for tourists. For many years Mexico has become a safety issue for anyone traveling abroad. Kidnappings and violence has plagued society from criminal gangs and organized criminals. A disregard for laws and respect towards anyone in that country.
    Can only imagine the economic impact of loss to those small business that rely on tourism.
    Moreover, the poverty rate which will only increase. Resorting to illicit means of income for some to sustain themselves.
    What an inept government!

    E42

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  8. When Reuters war correspondents are staying in the same place your vacationing in, time to check out.

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  9. I'm from a town called jalostotitlan in jalisco. It is very dangerous there now with many people disappeared. This all started happening after the CJNG arrived there in 2015. My wife works as a DARE official and she tells me that all the cops are working for the cartel and even committing kidnappings and murder for them. Be careful in jalisco los altos.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for your local insight.
      Please send in anything of interest.

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    2. 12:26. Exactly that's why Menchos days are numbered just as los Zetas, LFM, CT, and all the other short sites criminal gangs that prey on civilians. Pinche CJNG is dying a slow painful death. Jajajaja! Jajajajjajs!!jajajajajaja!!! Jajaja!!!
      _^^_

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  10. Just say don't go to Mexico.

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  11. This is bs for the state of michoacan I've been here almost 2 months for vacation visiting Morelia, Cheran, Uruapan etc. lol nothing but good times! Just don't come out here trying to be tough and starting bar fights or mean mugging and you're good!

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  12. Stop the demand of drugs and selling guns to the wronge people. Thats how mexico is gonna be less insecurity. No walls or sending us troops is gonna make it peace.

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    Replies
    1. There u are dd!!

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    2. Funny @ 10:21 am

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    3. Drug demands will never stop. Get that utopic idea out of your head.

      Delete
  13. hey heres my advisory- stay the hell out of Mexico. for your safety :)

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  14. Like I said, YUCATÁN is all about peace and good food...

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  15. my family is from rosario, but they moved to mazatlan. anyone know how are things in rosario? thank in advance

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    Replies
    1. Its bad. Father has a home there. Trying for years to convince to go elsewhere.
      Too many drug addicted people running amok.

      E42

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  16. Too much tweekers in Sinaloa.

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  17. Como diria cualquier pinchi narco, con dinero bailan hasta las marranas mas blancas, y tatuadas ni se diga, hdtsrpm...

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    Replies
    1. 10:41 no te metas con nuestras reporteras o comentaristas guey.

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    2. WTF?? O_o

      -eLxBarrett

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  18. the baddest of the bad cartels is the mexican federal government, and famously, the ambassadors of good will from the US, but this is no news, according to "The Confessions of an Economic Hitman" Named John Perkins, published in 2004...
    Some of us have been reccomending a BOYCOTT, because most of the mexican people do not benefit from all the tourism anyway, but the naysayers had to wait until the government of the US got ashamed of its cowardice and is making this bad propaganda up because of EPN's wall denial.

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    Replies
    1. Unless you want complete anarchy the federal government will always exist for any country. What is the point of crying and complaining?

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    2. 11:41 the mexican federal government is the worst murderer and drug trafficker in mexico, and the us government finances, supports and provides arms to those criminals, even after they have been unmasked a few too many times by many reporters.
      the mexican people can take care of business, as soon as the US government grows a pair and gets out of the way

      Delete
  19. PS with these kind of gueras around the Playa del Carmen it will be very hard to keep touristas away, perhaps, maybe if you show some 5 ft tall mexican latin lovers

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  20. Pretty much everywhere

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  21. The U.S. should just banned all Americans from visiting Mexico, that would scare mexico to the point that I bet the Mexicans politicians would finally stand up to the cartels, and shut down most of their control.

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    1. Mexicou shall make like Cuba and become the favorite refuge of billionaire AMERICAN, RUSSIAN, OR EUROPEAN SWINDLERS, as american financier Robert Vesco who escqaped the US and became a cuban money launderer when the cubans most needed him to launder billions of dollars from their own cocaine drug trafficking to the US, acontract they earned from sending Che Guevara to angola to rob some mining for new rich mining kids on the block and then to his untimely death in bolivia where he got killed like a trapped rat by drug trafficking US "soldier of fortune hero of a thousand secret battles'cuban exhile felix ismael rodriguez mendigutia, who also got pablo escobar and kiki camareena muedered, according to DEA heros Hector Berrellez, Phil Jordan and other witnesses.

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    2. You need to do your research pertaining the economics of tourism. The remittance of the money back into Mexico from family and loved ones and illegal gains outweigh that of tourism. This is the money generator!

      E42

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  22. I've never seen such a detailed travel advisory. This may be because we have a new regime in the usa that has a chip on it's shoulder about Mexico?

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    1. 11:00 more than a chip, the US has a facking 'Wall' on its future if the "so-called US government" bluff over the budget works

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    2. 11:00
      You haven't seen one ever, it's your first time and you act as if you always check the State Department's website. They're always detailed.

      Delete
  23. Come on Yaqui!! Get em posted!! Can't wait to read these comments!! U should let DD handle the replies!! Lol!!

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    Replies
    1. OK by me.
      Stay tuned.
      Administrators post comments not all the reporters.

      Delete
    2. hey let the administrators take their time, it is not eazy when you are all drunk, pissed, shat, full of puke, hung over and passed out all at the same time, it is the weekend damit, we had that eclipse and the world could have ended you know?

      Delete
  24. I don't believe it, sinaloa is calm. A sinaloa

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  25. Those plazas are in dispute, that's why so much violence

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  26. It is safe.. I am a wealthy Gringo Traveler who stayed in a protected Cancun resort last week and nothing happened to me.
    I even wandered a half a block away from the resort property to another protected resort property and bought a taco.
    I just do not see what people are worried about. !

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  27. BTW, the "Zona Dorada" picture of Mazatlan is Olas Atlas, not the Zona Dorada, which is much further north.

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  28. i went to the seventh circle of hell this summer.I got to say everything is safe just mind your own business puro relax.

    ReplyDelete

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