Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Cartels Next Door (a 6 part series) : Cartels' Roots Run Deep in N.M.

Posted by DD Republished from Albuquerque Journal 
Thanks to BB reader Judeg99 for the heads-up on this story.
By Mike Gallagher / Journal Investigative Reporter
 Mexico’s drug cartels earn billions of dollars in profits as they funnel heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine and marijuana into drug-hungry countries, including the United States. Crime, death and ruined lives flow right along with those drugs to places as varied as New York City, West Virginia coal country, Albuquerque, Española and western Europe. Despite the efforts of law enforcement, the cartels rival international corporations in size and reach. The drugs they peddle are cheaper and more plentiful than ever before, claiming thousands of victims every year. The Albuquerque Journal today begins a six-part investigative report on a criminal enterprise wreaking havoc across the country.

FIRST IN A SERIES
A Ciudad Juárez drug runner who goes by the name of Saxon. (Roberto E. Rosales/Journal
You don’t have to look south across the border to see the Mexican drug cartels in operation. They are operating right next door.

Heroin rings and methamphetamine dealers with direct connections to international drug traffickers based in Mexico have operated out of stash houses in Albuquerque’s Northeast Heights, horse ranches in Valencia County, communities on the Navajo Nation and small towns a stone’s throw from the Mexican border.

And while we in New Mexico focus on drug-fueled property crimes such as auto theft and horrific violence such as the murders of 10-year-old Victoria Martens and Rio Rancho police officer Gregg “Nigel” Benner, our state is much more than a local market. It is a primary corridor for the cartels to ship drugs nationwide.

Federal law enforcement estimates the Sinaloa Cartel alone controls somewhere between 40 and 60 percent of illegal drugs used in the United States. It supplies dealers in cities and states including New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Phoenix, New England, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Mexico.

The Juárez Cartel supplies heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and marijuana dealers in North Carolina, Alabama, Oklahoma, Minnesota, New Mexico and parts of Texas.
A Homeland Security officer inspects the interior of a tractor-trailer rig that had been carrying produce into the United States through the port of entry at Santa Teresa. (Roberto E. Rosales/Journal)

There is plenty of proof of Mexican cartel operations in New Mexico, as evidenced by some of the operations taken down by law enforcement. For example:


• In May 2012, Luis Rangel and his brother, Miguel, set up shop in Shiprock, on the Navajo reservation. Their business: selling methamphetamine obtained from the Sinaloa Cartel in Phoenix to their Navajo neighbors and in the nearby community of Kirtland, just off the reservation.

• Since the 1990s, members of Ivan Romero’s family have run a tight-knit distribution network that cornered the heroin market in Taos County, serving addicts in the villages and towns of northern New Mexico with heroin imported through Albuquerque from Mexico.

• In Albuquerque, Jesus Munoz Lechuga ran an auto body shop in the far South Valley, receiving cocaine, marijuana and heroin from La Linea faction of the Juárez Cartel and then shipping it to Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Illinois and Alabama.

• Homero Varela ran a racehorse business in Valencia County when federal law enforcement broke up the Sinaloa Cartel associate’s $15 million cocaine, methamphetamine and marijuana business.

• At the time of his arrest in July 2015 in Roswell, Joseph Mendiola and his associates were caught by federal and local agents holding 16 pounds of methamphetamine, most of it coming from the Phoenix area and delivered by Francisco Aguilar-Larios. The methamphetamine was destined for sale across the southeastern part of the state.

• From his home in Socorro, Carlos Tafoya Jr. turned out to be one of three suppliers of highly pure methamphetamine to dealers for $800 to $1,200 an ounce who then sold it in smaller amounts on the Mescalero Apache Reservation.

• In the past year, federal agents have broken up two methamphetamine and heroin rings operating in and around Sunland Park, often following the drugs as couriers crossed the bridges in El Paso and made their deliveries in the small New Mexico city.

Big business

Estimates on how much money the cartels make each year vary widely. A RAND Corp. study estimated that $6.6 billion in drug profits make it back to Mexico from the United States. Other studies place the figure much higher, in the $40 billion range.

Those figures are meaningless to drug addicts paying $20 for two-tenths of a gram of heroin in Questa.

And the reality is that only a portion of that $20 is going back to Mexico. How big a portion depends on whether the seller was a dealer with a specific cartel or working for a local drug trafficking group that would keep a larger portion of the $20.

Law enforcement has the same problem when estimating the size of the cartels. One study says there are 150,000 members of the Sinaloa Cartel. Another says most of those people are independent contractors and there are only 150 real “members” of the cartel. Whichever is correct, the enterprise is massive.

And the cartels are hard to crack along with being big and profitable.
 

Cartel operations are so compartmentalized that most people working for the organization couldn’t tell you the names of more than 10 co-workers. And virtually all of them would prefer some time in a U.S. prison to giving up significant information. In fact, a sentence of less than 10 years in a U.S. prison is a badge of honor and good resume building.

Under any estimate, the drug profits taken in by the cartels are immense, rivaling those of any international corporation.

All these operations, small and large, track the drugs they sell back to two of Mexico’s six major transnational criminal organizations – the Juárez and Sinaloa cartels.

Will Glaspy, Drug Enforcement Administration special agent in charge of the El Paso division, is responsible for an area that extends from the Big Bend area in Texas to the New Mexico-Arizona line.

“If you look at that entire area, we’re still seeing marijuana, we’re seeing cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine,” Glaspy said. “If you look at the last four, five years of seizure data, cocaine is the only seizure stat that I have that is going down. Marijuana, meth and heroin are all going up.

“Seizures may be going down in some corridors, but not in our corridor.”

Death toll

The death toll keeps rising, right along with the flow of illegal drugs and prescription opioids – which in some respects is a different but related problem.
A Customs and Border Protection officer inspects the interior of an engine with a small camera at the Santa Teresa port of entry. (Roberto E. Rosales/Journal)
Heroin and opioid addiction have grabbed New Mexico’s headlines over the past few years as the state either led the nation or was near the top in the percentage of people dying of drug overdoses. Last year, the state improved to eighth nationally – partly as a result of efforts to stem the problem and treat addicts and partly because death tolls jumped in other states.

In rural and urban New Mexico, health officials, police and federal law enforcement use the word “epidemic” so often the word loses its impact.

Nationwide, more than 47,000 people died of drug overdoses in 2014 – more than were killed by firearms or in car accidents.

More than half of those died of overdoses of prescription drugs, either legally or illegally purchased.

But there were more than 10,000 heroin overdose deaths last year, and the number of methamphetamine overdose deaths appears to be rising.

The exact number of heroin addicts in the United States has always been a moving target as addicts die, enter treatment, go to jail or prison and new initiates start using. But from 2007 to 2014, the number of new heroin users doubled from 106,000 a year to 212,000 a year, according to federal health officials.

Some of the most tragic are young people who start on prescription drugs and switch to cheaper and readily available heroin.

The national estimate for methamphetamine users in 2014 was 1.3 million – up from almost 1.2 million in 2013.

Meanwhile, the price of methamphetamine – the drug the people charged in the sexual assault and murder of 10-year-old Victoria Martens in Albuquerque allegedly were high on – has dropped from a high of more than $250 a gram in 2007 to below $50 in 2015.

And the purity of the drug on the street exceeds 90 percent, making it cheaper and stronger than cocaine or crack cocaine.

That follows the same pattern established by Mexican heroin, prices of which have fallen to less than $40 a gram to dealers who in turn sell to addicts.

Drug crime

It is accepted law enforcement wisdom that illegal drugs drive crime in communities.

“Most violent and property crime ties back to drugs,” said Deputy APD Chief Eric Garcia. “Both heroin and methamphetamine are extremely addictive,” he said. “We’re finding more polydrug users. Meth users take heroin to come down from their high. As a result, we’re seeing more polydrug dealers on the street.”

Last year, agents from the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and APD ran an undercover operation in Albuquerque expecting to make gun and drug deals with up to 50 career criminals.

They made 104 cases in four months, almost overwhelming the ability of the U.S. Attorney’s Office to handle.

While heroin overdose deaths caught the attention of health officials, law enforcement usually ranks methamphetamine abuse as a greater threat to public safety than heroin addiction.

“The crimes with meth tend to be more heinous, more shocking,” Garcia said.

And New Mexico is no stranger to the horrific crimes linked to both drugs.

Among them:

• There was methamphetamine running through Andrew Romero’s bloodstream when he shot and killed Rio Rancho Police Officer Gregg “Nigel” Benner in May 2015 while planning a robbery to pay for more drugs during a 25-day drug and robbery binge.

• Davon Lymon was slinging heroin and arranging a heroin buy for a 17-year-old girl when he allegedly shot and killed Albuquerque police officer Daniel Webster during a traffic stop on East Central in October 2015.

• Fabian Gonzales was a regular meth user for years, before he was charged in the grisly murder of his girlfriend’s 10-year-old daughter, Victoria Martens, last summer. Victoria’s mother, Michelle Martens, and Jessica Kelly are also charged with first-degree murder and intentional abuse of a child, among many other offenses.
 

• A 13-year-old girl on the Mescalero Apache Reservation was brutally assaulted by two other teens, both of whom were high on methamphetamine.
 

The only thing the crimes have in common is drugs, and the drugs all come from Mexico – cheaper and stronger than ever.

 As a bonus to our readers, Journal investigative reporter Mike Gallagher provides additional background and insights about the Juárez and Sinaloa cartels in video interviews.




NEXT IN THE 6 PART SERIES;

The Cartels Next Door: Far from dead, Juárez Cartel flexes its muscles


















80 comments:

  1. Saxon looks like a Mortal Combat fighter hahaha

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  2. What's the name of that family that came out on that tv show about mobs hosted by sum Italian

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    Replies
    1. La familia peluche

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    2. Hahaha! Good one

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    3. *4:21
      Te pasaste, made me spit my coffee.LOLZ

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  3. Thanks dad for sharing this powerful story. It truly shows the depth and cost of drug addiction in the US. Given the fact that the war on drugs has been a complete failure,my heart breaks for the innocent victims who's life's are destroyed. As a "ex" member of a Texas gang mentioned to me recently, for every gang members who is killed or goes to prison,there are 20 ready to take their place. I will be sharing this article on facebook. Keep up the great work. I look forward to the second article. God bless.

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  4. Where does Heisenberg fall into all of this?

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  5. How much of the billions going back to Mexico are destined for paying bribe??

    My personal guess is: about 90%! Whatever the number is the BIG winner from the drug business are not the cartels - sure the top shots may make quite a bit - but the politicians, police commanders, military officers, judges, attornies and everybody else sitting behind a desk with money stashed in the drawers!

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  6. All of this after 30 years of WoD!

    Just fucking legalize it, ALL OF IT! And make sure there is no way to profit from selling drugs that way nobody will be trying to get new users hooked!

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    1. 9:17am if they "just legalize" it as you say,then all of the ppl 9:13am mentioned wouldnt be able to support their familys.Therefore drugs will never be legalized in the usa..

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    2. Legal or illegal . How would that effect these violent meth driven sex crimes ? I day we change the rules and step up the WAR ON DRUGS . Execute more frequently and put in a express lane to the death chamber . Kill these drug dealing rats out

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  7. Yeah was wondering about La Linea for long time,they were hugely powerful at one time and crazy brutal videos came from them,El Diego was a little monster.Lot of members were ex police and serving,nothing happened without them finding out,Juarez Femicides happened on their watch?
    What is that dude wearing?He looks like a refugee from duran duran

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  8. CNDJ is a very smart cartel. CNDJ will last longer then the mega cartels like CDS. The reason is Juarez keeps itself small and mostly regional. It doesn't try to displace other cartels from their turf. CNDJ keeps its hierarchy in place and no one capo is above the cartel unlike CDS. CDS is fractured and it will continue to fracture until there are too many splinter group similar to CDG and Zetas. This article will get a lot of hate but hey CNDJ did push CDS out of the majority of Chihuas after being left for dead. You gotta respect that.

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    1. I agree with you @9:58

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    2. Arriva sinaloa wei me agarro a tu morra d nuevo

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    3. @2:53 Arriva Sinaloa, pero de mis huevos!

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  9. Yeaaaahhhh DD is my hero. Big ups and big props to DD.

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  10. Gente Nueva X Antrax X Talibanes X

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  11. Thanks BB for all your hard work. Great stories. I do believe that Arizona is really the biggest drug trafficking area in the USA. Of course, human trafficking, kidnapping, prostitucion, money laundering as well. There are some large businesses in Arizona, with connections in and to Mexico, which appear to be legitimate but are not. Many corrupt US Govt employees as well. Some hidden some published. Not just border patrol either.

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    1. They don't call Phoenix "little Sinaloa" for nothing. Phoenix is CDS. Money Laundry like crazy. Drug Trafficking, Human Smuggling, The while 9 yards. If I'm correct Phoenix is the drug trafficking capital of the United States. Everyone from up east and north come here for business. Avenidas De La Phoeniquera Ain't no Joke.

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    2. Looks you lnow too well to the point you can share the names so, go for it @10:31

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    3. Phx is CDS home ain't no secret.. but plentyyyy of BLO & juarez 2... city is like warehouse no joke
      -CDS nutthugger

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    4. The only reason Phoenix gets the most Drug Traffic and is because it's the route fully controlled by CDS. From there they leave to California or other States. CDS still controls routes in San Diego. But Arizona is fully controlled.
      all you gotta do is reach the highway leave your bags and your gone.

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    5. Phoenix is the shithole of the Southwest just like Chicago is the shithole of the Midwest. Phoenix is the kidnapping capital of the US even though majority of the kidnapping don't get reported. El Paso is 10 times better when it comes to safety. The difference is Phoenix is a CDS city and El Paso is a CNDJ city. La Linea has their streets and turf on lock. Enough said.

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    6. 2:06 I can say the same. CDS has there shit on lock here in phx. When do you hear of large expensive shipments getting caught in sonoyta or Douglas/AP. All the kid napping that occurs is either from debts being settled of people trying to invade CDS turf. One bad thing I have noticed though being that Phoenix is the drug trafficking capital of the US is that there's a lot of bajadores here. You don't know if they are blacks, whites, Chinese, or Mexican. But one this is certain as big as the operation out here may seem. Everyone knows each other one way or another which makes things a little easier when weeding out the bajadores.

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    7. @10:11 In Phoenix people don't get kidnapped for encroaching in CDS turf. Little street gangs might try tactics like that but not CDS. CDS is a fuckin punk when it comes tp flexing it's muscle in the U.S. They do however kidnap people for personal debts to them there. Stop with the lies. There are Juarez cartel and Beltranes in Phoenix for that reason.

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    8. I was locked up in Phoenix and there was a few bajadores but most of the kidnapping charges were from Sinaloa coyotes that got caught on watch in a safe house and got a kidnapping charge for every illegal in the house. That's the reason it's the kidnapping capital of U S. Cause of the coyotes. There were other coyotes from other states of mex. but were cool to the illegals and never snitched on them. The other coyotes would get high on meth and point guns at them for the hell of it so it bit them on the ass later. I was in county for almost 2 years so I know what I'm talking about..

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  12. @5:51 the padillas
    I think jeff is out of prison now if i remember right

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  13. Thank you for this post DD. I live in NM. Seems like our border with Mexico is routinely left out, like only California, Arizona and Texas are on the border. Mexicab cartels are thriving here. The crimes get more brutal every day. NM ranks as the lowest of all American states in nearly every measurement of education, employment, income, standard of living, and child welfare. We have grossly understaffed and corrupt law enforcement agencies throughout the state. NM is more like Mexico than the USA. Nobody seems aware of the tragic demise, as if nothing extraordinary is going on.

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    1. NM has the 2nd most police related murders on citizens in the nation per capita. And a very bad gang problem. Prices are so cheap, everybody is killing each other over control of the dope game with the little money that is here. Cops have jacked me a few times. But it's better than new chargers and getting more time. But that happens in every major city..Burqueños por vida!!

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    2. That's sad because the state of New Mexico generates more revenue per capita than most states. Instead of reinvesting the money into the highways, schools or jobs they place it into social services. By social services i mean food stamps and WIC. Obviously that is not a bad thing for those who truly need it. The only problem is those services are being abused because it's so easy to obtain. When I lived in NM I lived less than 5 minutes from the Texas border. If you were a single expecting female and you lived in Texas but you were close to the NM border you hauled ass to NM. Why? Because it was 10 times easier to get Welfare in NM than in Texas. When mom has exhausted your benefits it was back to Texas. I saw this practice first hand many many times. I left NM in 2006 but I doubt the mentally has changed much 11 years later.

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    3. Leeches sucking off the taxpayers...

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  14. I'm from Burque,NM. And it's hard core. Right up there with Chicago, LA, per capita. No economy. So it's a way of life to grow up gangsters and hustlers. And the ultimate outcome is death, prison, or the lucky few that get to make it out. It's just considered "normal". I got lucky and moved away and got in school and have a trade now. So I don't have to worry about looking over my shoulder anymore. It's too bad what's happening to our "RAZA" and our younger generation...I miss my familia and our food, but I would be dead or locked up again (4 times in the pinta) if I stayed in the game. I'm proud where I come and would never snitch on nobody, but I am trying my best to move forward.

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    Replies
    1. Glad you got out of that old life. Good for you!

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  15. I'd like to see a map showing the arms dealers n distribution into Mexico from the US. cause bb only seems to focus on blaming it all on Mexico but never acknowledge the US involvement.I just wanna see both sides of the coin. Comanche

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    1. I'd like to see a figuring on how many weapons over the years were sold or gifted to the cartels by the Mexican military and Police.

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    2. I know in Michoacan a bunch of the weapons come from china.Yet I always hear the same BS from ignorant fools."Its American fault for lax gun laws"

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    3. Yeah brah
      Obama and Holder

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    4. 3:38 ure a parasite delusional if u believe it's Chinese weaponry in Mich.

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  16. The good thing is that soon the United States will stop all drug cartel operations thanks to Donald Trump. Now the American drug addicts will only use American made prescription drugs.

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    1. Here here!! Americans first!

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    2. Nixon stated the war against cartels not trump.

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    3. Sell methamphetamines automatic deportation.. Get it done Trump!!

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    4. Yea, methadone and suboxone is billion $ + a year industry. It's actually at least triple times as hard to break off that than heroin or pills. Ask any real drug counselor, and NOT someone who works at a methadone or suboxone clinic because they say you can live a normal life because they've been trained to say that. If they said the truth, they would be out of a job.. That's why they promote it so much. Why let the cartels get rich when the pharmaceutical companies can make all that money? You're still hooked. And even worse. The majority of people that get on that stay on it the rest of their lives. Rehabs don't even accept people on that? So then what? You're a slave to the pharm. companies, not the cartels. Best things is not to try it cause it's a life of misery. I know from experience. Youngsters have a long miserable life ahead of them.

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    5. Xlllent comment 4:03 Chump like like all his predecessors r really there for their own interests they don't really care bout ordinary people.

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  17. No wonder damaso wants to be the only top jefe. CDs is all over the United States. Juarez n golfos barely push compare to chinola. I know a couple of buddy's that do that wholesale out here in northern cali they r from Sinaloa but not member of the cartel pretty much independent. So the article is right there's no way of telling how many active members are in the cartel.

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    1. Jeff Sessions wants to have a talk with you. You have been summoned!

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    2. The Feds are on the way Snitch

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    3. Snitched on what you prick? Vincent Zambada sang a fuckin Opera,Barbie is a fuckin pro soprano,Chapo can sing anything,all your heroes and you call some guy snitch on here ? I swear man there are more and more freak clowns on here

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    4. @12:43 Economics 101 homie. The bigger the cartel the more hands are in the pot. The more hands you have in the pot the smaller the profits. The smaller the profits the more friction between capos and jealousy erupts. The more friction and jealousy the more backstabbing and betrayal. If I'm not mistaken isn't CDS going fhru this process? The smaller you are and the more loyalty you have equates longevity. The Juarez cartel has been around longer than the CDS in name and they will stay around longer. Too many internal conflicts are sinking the cool kids ship within the CDS. I'm not taking away from what CDS has built but ultimately all good things come to an end.

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    5. @9:01 I'll have to debate you a little on Eco.101.
      I was never very good in economics, but I remember something about "economy of scale". A well structured organization can increase it's profits by increasing it's size. So if all those extra hands in the pot are productive there is going to be more money in the pot for everyone. Just takes smart management to know where the tipping point is for growth.

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  18. Cocaine is dropping because Columbians aren't 100 percent producing it since they discovered that mining gold is worth much more. Saddly men are dieing of mercury poisoning. Cocaine isn't addictive.

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    1. Saludos
      -Sarai Fan Club

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    2. Cocaine isn't addictive? Are you out of your mind?

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    3. Cocaine has risen in price what are you talking about. Wtf

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  19. Thank God Trump Won!

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    1. This is why he won,all this hate and racism.And he gets called racist ?

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    2. N Korea n Iran ? They keep laughing at us there the real danger n yet they live here with businessess n they don't ask for money in the streets like Anglos Latinos n blacks

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  20. I travel all over Northern California and is hard to find people from Sinaloa but if you find them you know they are drug dealers they the one supplying the black gangs

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    1. Sinaloans supply the Whites also. The Racist Whites and Mexicans. We supply everyone. Get everyone addickted

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    2. "Sinaloans supply the Whites also. The Racist Whites and Mexicans"
      If whites are racist wonder why ?
      And your not racist?Motherfucker please,your hating on Mexicans,fuck outta here internet banger.
      Bellends like you hatin on everyone,black ,white,Mex-Amer,Chinese,Samoan

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  21. Reality is clearly presented in this article of how much money and the volume of consumption mostly in America. But America and Mexico neglects to address the issues why many revert to drugs and trafficking. Lack of jobs for one at a decent wage , but most important is the discrimination which the hiring process of individuals with a criminal to get a fair shake. Denial of employment is why are huge majority turn to drug trafficking, sales to make ends meet. Not advocating it's right to engage in such activities but opportunities should not be far reaching to become a respectable member of society. We are all human and as such we make mistakes in life but that should not impede our progress for a respectable life. Dire circumstances begets dire actions. It's sad and disheartening but the majority of the problems is lack of opportunities.

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  22. The writer says In 2007 a gram of meth costs 250 dollars.....really...really

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    Replies
    1. He was obviously wrong. During that time 1/8 of a oz was $250.

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  23. Who comes up with these numbers? Are you guys there accountants?How the hell do you think you know how much they make? How come your guys speculations of how much they make are way different then each other

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  24. Drug is drugs
    Cartel is cartels
    Politic is politics
    Money (ie Power) is lusted

    An industry this big (billions from the US, billions from Europe, billions from Asia) has graft, greed, and corruption on all sides, at all levels, of all borders.

    Corruption is deep on both sides of the border or the US map could not be painted so completely Sinaola Orange as this article's map of the US shows.

    Is the cartel the only one with their hands in the pot on the US and European side? Common sense says a fair portion of this invested money is from people or organizations with available money to turn a high risk profit or maybe influence societal class behaviors and geopolitical outcomes.

    Don't say it is just Mexico with greed and corruption.

    Do large international corporations operate by personally selling $20 dollars at a time to their end users? Did Bill Gates know every Windows user and personally sell them their software?

    Without the $100,000, and more likely million dollar, and up investors, there are no drug cartel organizers with multi-million dollar to multi-billion dollar net worths.

    Drug traffic financing goes into all levels in the US, Euorpe, and Asia - through anyone (drug traffickers / professionals / non-professionals / government agencies) who may make money available to finance the large dollar volumes that would be of interest to the international cartels.

    The ground floor distributors (who are disposable, ie sometimes dead, psychologically or physically maimed, addicted, or jailed) have no protection in this system, as it is rigged to favor the largest financiers.

    Maybe legalization to better protect those at the bottom is something to try. Although they will then be swapping control over to multi-national pharma style operations.

    Not likely but maybe the end users, suppliers and the non-users who experience continued societal decay unite to force their political will - until then those in power continue with the status quo.



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  25. I was just in ABQ for the Rocky Gun Show lol it was pretty nuts. I was sure packing an AR, and 12guage pump gun and 2 45 cal glocks as well as packing my glock 19

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    1. Damn Bulldog! You was going all out bro! Better 2 have it and not need it... - Sol Prendido

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    2. Bulldog..Welcome to Alb, NM. Land of Enchantment (entrapment)! The majority of us all strap like that. But strictly throwaways. That's how we roll in the SW from El Paso, Burque, Phoenix, So Cal..

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    3. Are you as loud out in NM as you are on this thread vato mamon

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    4. What can i say my Infantry time prepared me

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    5. This is 1034 to El Bulldog former US Marine here. You are an idiot sounds like you want attention

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    6. At 10:34AM lets just say that if you ran across me you wouldnt be able to who i am or what i do. I can proudly say that ive been all over the Border starting from San Diego to Calexico where i grew up all the way to Nogales, juarez, laredo and so forth

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    7. Bulldog you are basura that's what you are with a mouth like yours you can be noticed miles away.

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    8. Pride is what destroys men. You can't say shit without some proud ass chiming in with their b.s.talk. Because we're all right in our own heads. Keep your head up BULLDOG. - Sol Prendido

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    9. "I can PROUDLY say that ive been all over the Border" para Sol Pendejo quoting BULLDOG who was packing a strap on

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    10. Like i said guys i was at the ABQ for the Rocky Gun Show.......

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  26. People are just getting dumber especially in these lonely states pinche raza cagada instead of doing something good with their lives this vato in this picture looks like he's at narco comic con pendejo

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