Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Peña Nieto Faces Unrest in Mexico as Gas Prices Climb and Trump Ascends *Powerful video*

Original article available at New York Times
By Kirk Semple and Elizabeth Malkin

MEXICO CITY — Amid nationwide marches, highway blockades and looting stemming from widespread outrage over an increase in gas prices, President Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico went on national television to appeal for understanding.

Mexico City

With international oil prices rising and Mexico dependent on gasoline imports, he argued in the speech on Thursday, the government had no alternative but to raise prices at the pump. “Here I ask you,” he said, gesturing at the camera, “what would you have done?”

It did not take long for him to get an answer, as social media erupted with suggestions and disgust.

Combat corruption and impunity. Eliminate gasoline vouchers for elected officials. Collect more taxes from multinational corporations. Cut the salaries and benefits of high-level government officials. Sell the presidential plane. Reduce the first lady’s wardrobe spending. Resign.


It was a tough week for the president, who seems to be trapped in a slow, downward spiral of unpopularity, with two more years left in his term and Mexico reeling from myriad problems including rampant corruption, resurgent homicide rates, a thriving drug trafficking industry, a sluggish economy and a plummeting peso.

Veracruz

The few voices of support for Mr. Peña Nieto — in political circles and among news commentators — have been drowned out by his detractors, and no more so than in the past week, when discontent over the gas price increase boiled over into protests and looting, setting off clashes with security forces that left several dead around the country.

The unrest comes as Mexico braces for the administration of President-elect Donald J. Trump, who has threatened to introduce far more restrictive immigration and trade policies, including canceling the North American Free Trade Agreement, increasing deportations and building a wall on the southern border of the United States.

Concern in Mexico about Mr. Trump’s planned tack on trade has been so great that he has been able to move the markets on the basis of his Twitter posts.


Mass lootings in Veracruz

The Mexican peso hit record lows last week after he criticized General Motors on Twitter for exporting cars made in Mexico and Ford Motors announced that it would cancel plans for a $1.6 billion plant in the country. Mexico’s Central Bank was forced to intervene to bolster the peso, but the currency took another hit after Mr. Trump threatened Toyota on Thursday with a “big border tax” if it went ahead with a new factory in Mexico.

Mexico’s Economy Ministry issued a brief statement in response saying the government “rejects any attempt to influence investment decisions by companies based on fear or threats.”

But in general the Peña Nieto administration seems to be struggling to figure out how to respond to Mr. Trump. Mexicans have been clamoring for a full-throated, chest-out defense of their country and sovereignty against Mr. Trump’s threats, but many say they have yet to hear it.

Confidence in Mr. Peña Nieto is so low — approval ratings have sunk below 25 percent — that he appears to be struggling to sell anything to the public, most recently the gas price increase last week.

“Such a low level of popularity reduces his capacity to gather support or his margin for action to reactivate the economy,” said Ignacio Marván, a political analyst at CIDE, a Mexico City university.


Mr. Peña Nieto’s efforts have been handicapped, analysts say, by a seeming disconnect from the public mood.


In Tijuana the protesters took over the border crossing to Tijuana from San Diego 

The government looked unprepared for the violent responses to the price increases, which took effect on New Year’s Day, when most officials were on vacation. Mr. Peña Nieto himself was in the middle of a golfing trip. And as bloody unrest swept across the country, the president kept silent, finally making a public statement on the issue on Wednesday.

Even then, his comments were buried in a news conference focused on cabinet changes that included the return of Luis Videgaray, a close confidant who resigned under pressure as finance minister in September after championing an unpopular visit by Mr. Trump to Mexico.

The administration’s detached response to the upheaval contributed to the impression of a president out of touch with the population, analysts said, and gave a sense of a leadership that is adrift, blindsided by events.


Protest in Sinaloa

The gas price increases of about 20 percent are part of a broad overhaul that ends the state’s monopoly over the energy industry. The government has long controlled and subsidized gasoline prices, but by the end of the year it will allow gas prices to fluctuate according to the market, a move intended to attract foreign investment to compete with the state oil company, Pemex.

The government has argued that ending fuel subsidies will help the country avoid spending cuts to social programs, and that the subsidies have disproportionately benefited wealthier Mexicans who own cars. But many fear that higher gasoline prices will increase costs for food and public transportation, hitting the pocketbooks of even the poorest Mexicans.

Though Mexico’s opposition parties are now condemning the price increase, most of them voted for it as part of the budget approved in October. But Mexico imports more than half of its gasoline from the United States, and Mr. Trump’s election sent the peso to a historic low, raising the price of imported gasoline in pesos greater than anybody expected.

Analysts said the government could have forestalled the fallout by designing measures that would have softened the blow for poorer Mexicans, or by creating subsidies for truck drivers or owners of older vehicles.

“They didn’t think about it,” said Vidal Romero, a political analyst at the Autonomous Technological Institute of Mexico. “There is no compensation for citizens.”


Ignited by the gas price increase, but fueled by broader discontent with the government and uncertainty about the country’s direction, citizens took to the streets, staging marches throughout the country and blocking key highways.


Meanwhile the Mayor of Tijuana Juan Manuel Gastelum "El Patas" loads gas in San Diego

Criminals also used the cover of the protests to break into stores and malls to strip shelves bare of home appliances, electronics, food and toys.

By last weekend, hundreds of stores had been looted around the country and more than 1,000 people detained, the authorities said, and at least six people had been killed in clashes between looters and the police.

The administration has rejected calls to rescind the price increase, and the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party traded accusations with opposition groups about responsibility for fomenting the disorder.

With Mr. Peña Nieto’s credibility so diminished, it will be impossible for the president to accomplish much before the 2018 presidential election, analysts said. He is not eligible to run again.

The contrast with the early days of Mr. Peña Nieto’s presidency is remarkable. When he took office four years ago, his sharp political instincts helped push a bold reform agenda through Congress with support from the opposition. The reforms included the opening of the traditionally closed energy sector to foreign investment, an exceptional political accomplishment given the Mexican public’s view of the oil industry as a bedrock of the national patrimony.


But now those instincts appear to have been eroded by scandal and mismanagement, and perhaps by an insulation from emotions on the street.


In Rosarito, Baja California a protester ran over a group of Federales

“He has lost his feeling for politics,” Mr. Romero said.

The president’s perceived weaknesses and his low approval ratings have opened up space for opposition groups and cast the future of his party’s influence into doubt. Even the Institutional Revolutionary Party’s longstanding dominance in the president’s home state, the populous State of Mexico surrounding Mexico City, has been thrown into question, with the state’s governorship up for grabs this summer.

Perhaps the biggest political beneficiary of Mr. Peña Nieto’s declining popularity has been the populist politician Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a former mayor of Mexico City, who is leading in polls of potential candidates for the 2018 presidential contest. With each misstep of the president, Mr. López Obrador seems to become even more popular; some political observers refer to Mr. Peña Nieto as Mr. López Obrador’s “campaign manager.”

The looting and criminal unrest across the country had subsided by the weekend, but protests continued, with thousands taking to the streets in largely peaceful marches.

“We don’t want this corrupt country any more,” said Alicia Rios, 32, a receptionist who joined thousands of protesters for a march through downtown Mexico City on Saturday. “The legislators get 10,000 pesos in gasoline vouchers when the people can’t afford to fill up their tanks.”


She added, “If gasoline goes up, everything goes up.”


*Video added by El Wachito

142 comments:

  1. Take a moment to watch the video that I added at the end of the article and give me your opinion.

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    1. O love it.It's funny and so true to life.It's brazen but eh isn't political life there brazenIn the article it mentions how EPN didn't stand up to Trump but the other country on the northern border is also doing the same.Not a peep out of Trudeau.Meantime investors are all on hold and worried.No one wants to piss off the US.Canada also doesn't know if a tariff is going to apply here also.Trump hasn't mentioned a word and US is our biggest export market.GM is moving 2 SUV models from Canada to an existing plant in Mexico.I wondered if EPN has unleashed a monster that can't be reined in.It's not about the gas increase.That's just the straw that broke the camel's back.All this pent up anger like crime and corruption,etc.etc.etc.The government has underestimated the people for too long.There's a lot of uncertainty in the economy.Meybe the government was riding the coat tails of free trade for too long while infasctructure to better the country was being done and many factory jobs were coming.They didn't really have to do anything besides ride the wave of optimism while they could majorly indulge themselves with their many dirty backroom deals and make more money for themselves than ever before with the spiralling corruption.Now they have to pay the piper.If this continues they will have to declare martial law and ask for the USA's help.Has it gone into anarcy?Is this the beginning of the revolution?

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    2. Good black comedy, kind of crude but the points are well made. We think we have bad presidents in the US, ha! Mexico hasn't had a good president since, well, never.

      Look at the history of the country, especially recently, that unfortunately, nothing ever changes for the better in Mexico. There are no happy endings. Even when things are good, it's bad for most.

      The psychology of the eternal victim/suffering martyr with lots of graphic bloodiness (as played by the female in the video) is well established in the culture (like all the sad songs in the cantinas) and in the mind of every Mexican.

      I predict more of the same vampiros and ratones and "reforms." There may be unrest and lots of desmadre as things continue to decline, there are very few good-for-Mexico scenarios in the current US and world political environment.

      La verdad, muy triste

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    3. Mexico needs to stand up and kick all the American businesses out of the country. How you doing!!

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    4. Who's made that video wachito? Great video

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    5. Watch it too, ira, mira, looki here, that is a lovely work of political art, the producer dedicates to "The Moneros", they are the cartoonists that make the world easier for us to see and understand in a few frames, this work leaves the mexican government no room to wiggle on every scene and there are more vudeos, you may lose a few readers, THANKS FOR THE GOOD FIND.

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    6. El kike peña y el "patas" son unos cinicos y descarados. Fact.

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    7. Well great video...what is the solution to all this?? Lets say Pena now to gets kicked out..what options does mexico really have?? Replace a rat by another rat?? By the way the video is powerful specially when the vampire is sucking off the life of the Mexican lady liberty...

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    8. Kick all the Gringos back to the US. Walmart, etc.

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    9. "Mexico needs to stand up and kick all the American businesses out of the country"

      Pathetic,the first of many mindless idiotic comments .

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    10. La verdad no peca pero incomoda

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    11. @4:16, If you kick out those companies, who will provide the jobs? The jobs may not pay well, but Mexico isn't creating many jobs. Corruption both in corporations and government insures that those at the top get paid first and the people suffer. But kicking out the companies will not help the people. Mexico has already tried this and it didn't work then either. Venezuela is doing it now and they're worse now than before. So seriously, if you shut them down, how will you replace those jobs?

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    12. 4:16-That's probably what may happen too or the foreigners may get slapped with a 35% tariff too but isn't that the idea to get US investment out of Mexico and back home and then Mexico will go back to the way it was before NAFTA.I'm quite sure a lot of Mexican businesses have been hurt like the small farmers,reno stores,Sorianas,etc.

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    13. Need get rid of all US citizens in mexico. No visas to US citizens. Keep Americans out.

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    14. @10:00PM Whether you or I are a supporter of Trump I think he got one thing right NAFTA needs to be renegotiated While it provided for the free flow of capital back and forth across the border "to create a level playing field" But there are 2 legs which are the foundation of Capitalism - capital and labor NAFTA did nothing to protect the workers

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    15. Arriba la Revolucion jijos del cocho.

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    16. Agree all American businesses out of Mexico GM Ford Dodge John Degree walmart get out. We will build ourselves with our labor and make it better

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    17. Job #1 of NAFTA or TLCAN or any other treaties is not to look after the workers, job # 1 is to make all the money they can possibly make, and whoever gets left behind or out of it, is no problem for the US or mexico or canada or any other member of OTAN, "THE WORKERS" should be happy they have a job...

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  2. If only Britain and Not Spain had colonized Mexico, it would be peaceful and prosperous and safe!

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    1. Yea blame others for the state Mexico is in. It's not Britain and Spains fault that corruption is a way of life and part of the culture in Mexico. They (the people) allowed it for so long that now it's beginning to rot their society

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    2. Unlikely Nigeria was under British control n their economy is worse that that of Mexico's

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    3. Heh Ok? and what have the likes of Sir Jimmy Saville and his Royal Family cohorts running DF instead of the current lot? What about 5/5 annual garden parties with cucumber sandwiches? Fuck yeah. Chapo & co would fit right in.

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    4. May have to agree with you on that one.

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    5. Are you serious? If you are, I take it you're not well educated in either history or current events. Here's a short list of former British Colonies - you tell me how's it going for them, Iraq, Egypt and India. Crime, Terrorism and famine are all everyday part of life there. The corruption of those in charge now has nothing to do with who colonized it

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    6. 9:54. Not sure how relevant it is, but every British colonized mentioned in this thread having problems is of darker colored skin. I am not racist, my family is Mexican but is there a correlation between skin color and the success of a nation? Please don't look at my question from an emotional view but just as a realistic view of how things seem to be.

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    7. Look at the latent racism spewing out.
      Predictable or what
      "im not racist,but" Mexicans arent racist.Yeah right

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  3. Because so many good people have left mexico. Mexico has lost a lot of talented hard working people who could helped. We r family that will never go back
    US has excepted us for our skills and talent

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  4. Because so many good people have left mexico. Mexico has lost a lot of talented hard working people who could helped. We r family that will never go back
    US has excepted us for our skills and talent

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    1. Exactly brother,all this fear and hate mongering from the media,this article right here is a type of negative propaganda,people getting near hysterical over trump and for what?Pena Nieto is also playing the game using trump,and many people believe it.The state of Mexico has nothing to do with Trump,but its a good hook to hang all the nationalism and negativity from either side,it will be eaten up..Nationalism from whatever side does not put food on your table or make a better life,thats for fools..

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    2. @10:11, bad paying jobs are still jobs. Kicking out those companies means no jobs and no money. Do the people really think that governments create jobs? Where do they think the money comes from?

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    3. Very good point never thought of it that way. Instead of solving our problems. Nieto blames it on trump. Mexico has many problems, crooked politics and zero security. How can u rise a family and do business in fail state

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    4. Mexico blames the US and vise versa. The reality is that American companies employ Mexicans in Mexico. Americans are able to buy cheaper products, because of cheaper production costs. In theory everyone should be a winner. What happens is Mexican government pockets the money that US companies pay for having their factories there. Of the many natural resources Mexico has it greatest is its own people, but it sells them out the same way it has sold out the other resources. Mexico needs to continue to allow US companies to operate, but they should pay for medical insurance and other benefits just like in the US.

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    5. #2;38 You said "American companies employ Mexicans in Mexico. Americans are able to buy cheaper products, because of cheaper production costs. In theory everyone should be a winner." You are on the right track, but what "cheaper production costs" really means is paying ridiculous low wages. Medical insurance and other benefits are nice perks, but a living wage is what is needed.

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    6. U r right the US fallt. All American and businesses out of Mexico. Come home brother we can build mexico

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    7. Foreign companies use mexico not to sell anything cheaper anywhere, all it is just a scam on their rich societies to leave them without jobs and use the cheapest labor available somewhere else, even offshored away from the american continent...thanks for abusing and exploiting our misery...

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  5. El valiente vive hasta que el cobarde quiere.

    - El Sol Perdido

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    1. True, covardes are always trying to get the upper hand of the valientes. If a valiente is goid at fighting the covarde will get a gun and shoot them.

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    2. It's just a second hand Spanish saying that I don't find wise.

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    3. 7:47

      What do u mean u don't find wise? That's a saying refering to what people are talking about here about people nor standing up to their own mexico
      'Wise guy'

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  6. Thanks for the video, Mexico has some of the best creative artists in the world

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  7. Undeniably correct...too sad

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  8. Why Hillary n not Obama?

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    1. Because her husband spearheaded NAFTA. I would imagine the Clintons aren't super popular in Mexico.

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    2. @10:40 a.m they did not spearhead NAFTA that would be bush sr who got that ball rolling!

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    3. North American Union

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    4. Obama a great president for U S. He would be a great President for Mexico

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  9. Powerful truthful and tragically sad video. Prayers for all in Mexico. Thanks El Wachito.

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  10. The only way to change Mexico is to take it over Fidel Castro style and kick out all the crooked politicos and change the whole rotten structure. Real spit

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    1. Under the last revolution about 100 yrs. ago, it was because of corruption. All the politicos were kicked out and PRI was born. Now the same situation "CORRUPTION" is happening again.

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    2. @11:45 While some of us may cheer the idea of another Revolution to clean out the corruption in the Mexican Govt. it is really just kind of a romantic idea kind of like cheering at a ball game. When you get down to reality though we all should hope that the process of cleaning up corruption does not follow the process used in the Revolution that started in 1910 and lasted at least 10 years (some scholars say it really went on until the 1930s). There is no way to know the actual number of killed in that Revolution, but most credible numbers are between 1 Million and 2 Million. Mexico does not need that again. Lets hope there is a better way. What are your solutions.

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    3. You will never clean corruption if the people don't change. Mexico doesn't have a corruption Problem it has a people problem.

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    4. The solution is a revolution

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    5. Revolution seems to be the only way to rebuild Mexico. Mexican government is useless. Filling their pockets while its citizens suffer. This practice seems endless with little hope in sight. Despite cries and pleas from its citizens for change, majority of its citizens have concluded no change is near without a political , civil revolution . TIME FOR CHANGE

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    6. @12:48, the problem with a revolution is the fact that it always REVOLVES. The game may change, but the players will be the same. The change that is needed isn't at the top it's at the bottom. Our people continue to be sheep and are being led to the slaughter house.

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    7. Agree pay everybody the same wage everybody equal

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    8. 2:23 I admire your obsession with "sheep", they are the preferred meal of wolves for a reason, but some people do not see them "sheep" as food, exactly, i'd also like to know what color sheep you prefer, black, white, brown or what?
      Straight hair or...?

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  11. It's well done, and thought provoking. Makes me think how little choice and/or power mexico/Mexicans have when it comes to the effects of being our neighbor.

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  12. Exelente description of the last 37 years of Mexico! With all that information available is predictable where, not only Mexico but the USA are heading.Well Engineering!

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    1. 7:50 After more than 200 hundred years of having mexico ramping up on this flight to hell because of having the US for "ouer ameegoos" del norte, let's not blame it all on the last 37 years of pendejadas narco-priistas verdecologistas...

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    2. 10.07
      Still preaching hate,says more about you than anything else

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    3. 12:12 if the bottom line is all in red numbers it is because they are red, no hate involved my dear Queen of Denial...

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  13. Unfortunately politcal unrest is global. Mexico like many nations are struggling ecomicaly , social changes and inflation have wrecked havoc everywhere. It's unfortunate that the timing of these circumstances as been under presidency of Pena Nieto. The United States is no different. Elections there have proved that economic issues were the key factors for Donald trumps victory. Lack of jobs , the corruption in which the political process works, immigration. Etc. Drain the Swamp was his bullhorn which called upon the many who felt the same way. For so long globalization was at a controlling pace. However times have changed with more trade globally and populations soaring. All governments are corrupt. The issues facing Mexico is that which many countries face : COMPETITIVENESS.

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    1. Ford, BMW, AUDI, nissan, toyota, among many other big corporations are tripping on their own shoelaces to invest in mexico, the cheap slave labor with high quality results is magnet #1 the government's greed, corruption and incompetence is problem #1.
      --problem #2 is the pendejos trying to point oir attention somewhere else by shining a light with a broken mirror mister brownie pointer...

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  14. Thx wachito.. That video seals da deal..

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  15. Dr.jose manuel mireles for president of mexico...

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    1. Hear, hear!

      Canadian girl

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    2. First they have to free him huh...justice for that brave man

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    3. El Dotor Mireles wasn't looking for any political position, and if he had a chance to lead a firing squad to execute epn i doubt he would do it.
      --All he wanted was to retire with his pension, and he went to prison before he qualified, because of some little men with a lot of "power"

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    4. Illumanati. That's what he is. Always have a person on the inside

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    5. 2:52 WHO IS ILLUMINATI? AND, WHY?
      ReelKurious, thanks

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  16. The sate Mexico finds itself in now has nothing whatsoever to do with Trump,people lapping this up already ?
    How dare the US worry about its borders ?

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    1. Mexico doesnt care about Trump like we say in Mexico " Perro que Ladra no Muerde " ; "a dog who barks doesn't bite " Trump can do whatever the heck he feels like doing. If he wants to invest in a stupid wall let him waste the taxpayers money or the US government vast amount of money . Wait don't they owe billions to China? Not my problem . Either way , Mexico already has hundreds of tunnels to go underneath or thousands of airplanes that fly over or hundreds of small boats to enter through the coast point being let him waste his time and your money (Us taxpayers ). The situation Mexico is in is due to the politicians taking care of the politicians . They are out of touch with society . This has been going on for way too long and Pena nieto is just anothe corrupt president but makes it very obvious.

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    2. I was in the marines on 98 and the wall was being built already in California so don't give me that bull shit that its just starting to be planned by trump. That has always been the plan ever since Clinton was in office. Google it

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    3. Well I wonder what stoped this brilliant plan ? Maybe because it was the dumbest idea ever and they realized that nothing would change. Except for wasting an insane amount of money .

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    4. What Border??????????

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    5. 6:12 usté si sabe compa, cualquer mexicano ya sabe:
      Que onde me las pinten brinco,
      Que en cualquer mecate tiendo,
      Y que en cualquer gancho me atoro...
      Aqui estamos, no nos vamos, y aqui nos quedamos.
      Ahorrense las trancas...

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  17. What goes around comes around. Put your big boy pants on and get back to work.

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    1. @10:26 lissen to your own advise, moron,
      before you throw it away to someone unknown @10:26

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  18. The Goverment should sell cocaine for 1 year, that will fix the budget, Hell the CIA did it with Panama in the 1980s

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    1. They are already. But it goes straight into their pockets

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    2. 2:00 as they say, the plaza is taken, it has owners, it is "private", they also own the funeral house and have your casket ready, or at least a body bag to wait your turn at the crematory, doubling as a garbage incinerator, and more important, don't even think about government confiscating their cash, remember what happened to Kiki Camarena, after 30 years, it has been dictaminated that Don Neto owes 1 million dollars to his and his pilot alfredo zavala avelar's families, but I remember Don neto is suppossed to be broke and without money, only owns a piece of land and a crumbling house.

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  19. 20% increase isn't shit. Boo hoo.

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  20. @Wachito. Great story amigo. I am so glad you published it. And your addition of the video was stroke of reporter genius. I think it may be the best encapsulation of the last 4 decades in Mexico that I have ever seen.

    I have watched the corruption scandals in Mexico for several years and watched the reaction of the Mexican people to those scandals. Though there have been demonstrations and protests the people seem to accept it as the norm with the attitude of "that's life, but it doesn't affect me" and go about their life.

    Because this time the "gasolinazo" does affect them in their pocketbook and EPN's response to it (playing golf and blaming Calderon and foreign markets for the price increases) I am wondering (and hoping) if this may be the drop that made the glass overflow.

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    1. I told you as oil privatization was being promoted that the pinchis politicos were falling in a trap, spending more money than the rosiest of the pink promises allowed and that they were going to find themselves drowning in a pile of shit.
      --Same thing happened in the campeche sound years ago...
      --Carretero Durango-Mazatlán, any explanation?

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    2. It is hard to have a people's reaction when the news are supressed, blacked out or put in the garbage because of somebody did not pay to make them politically correct, or paid to have them blacked out, as in the case of mexico, where people get murdered even if they do not publish what they know

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  21. nothing will change til the corrupt are purged, death to any politician that accepts bribery

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  22. Many fools cannot grasp that it was Pena Nieto who announced his reforms,how long ago ?

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  23. This shit will never end between the US and Mexico,now it seems as though Mexicans think they have every right to cross borders and how dare the US and many people wonder who is crossing ? Its a two way street filled with gringo hatred that begets animosity

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    1. I wonder who's sending those Haitian refugees to Mexico? Someone is obviously telling them where to go?

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    2. They have every right

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    3. The 70s saw many many mexicans and others coming over to the US, culminating in the 80s with the amnesty of reaganomics that also saw offshoring of american jobs take flight for good and drug trafficking to the US until somebody started spelling the beans about the contras, and the demonization of "politically incorrect" Gary Webb by corrupt press the NY times and others, for which these great rags of journalism later apologized,
      --the sociopaths that caused the crack epidemic have still not been prosecuted,
      --the crack babies still are being accused and persecuted for their misery, violence and ignorance.

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    4. In the 80s I went bankrupt, sold shares of my company and stole all the money, my investors got back one dime per dollar invested, but I earned myself "a whole Lotta money", right now I only owe about two billion dollahs, but nobody will notice two or three billions dollars missing from the cash box eery year...

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  24. I remember in Arizona the gas prices went from $1.50 to $4-$5 in a few days and the corrupt media said it was a pipeline that broke , which was BS and people just took it in that a** and thanked the government for it

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    1. And if the media/journalists dont let themselves be corrupted they are bumped off: Mexico is a virtual killing field for journalists!

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  25. So..... Up here in N Texas I just filled my truck up for $2.04 USD a gallon, which is about 11.38MXN a liter at today's exchange rate. Odds are that it came out of the same refinery, since Mexico has allowed their refining capacity to collapse thru miss-management and corruption (government, management and union joint effort) and imports most of its gas from Texas. It was transported about the same distance as the fuel delivered in Mexico and it was also overly taxed so that can't be the excuse. On the bright side it was real gas and not the dulituted down crap I buy in Mexico. So now Mexico is looking to the Looney left to turn the country into another Venezuela.
    Maybe a wall is a good idea for all concerned.

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    1. Yes because doesn't the cartels black market gas. What good is a wall silly if you and I who live in bordering states are gonna be paying higher taxes to maintain the wall. It's not that the fence is failing its purpose it's do to corrupted employees who take their post for granted maybe talk watch towers will do a sniper included if shit goes down.

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    2. Lybian "ugly evil dictator" of lybia helped people buy their car, and gasoline was $0.04 usd a gallon, which may be a lie, or a threat to world peace and finance world...
      ..WAS a Threath...

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  26. For purposes of comparison and a point of reference, What the cost of gas now in Mexico?

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    1. 4.00 dollars for a gallon of gas in a 1 gallon container that measures 1.5 gallon at the pump, = 6.00 dollar, plus tax plus iva plus lo que me de mi chingada gana, pagas o te vas al bote cabrón...ye quedo con tu "mueble"

      Delete
  27. Well maybe it's time for Mexico to hike up wages, high tax American businesses that are in Mexico like Wal-Mart, Home depot, restaurants opened by white American, hike up the price at the border on car visas. Nah then will be paying more at Wal-Mart home depot and other foreign American businesses. Pena nieto it's time to hike up the wage for Mexico its time for you to give back to Mexico everything you took to please your buddy's in the cartels.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Smart thinking.

      Delete
    2. Good idea SD.I know they just raised wages but they need to have a 'decent' living wage in Mexico without bending over backward to appease companies with the low wages.I think if the wage was reasonable even $20 or $30 minimum wage there wouldn't be so much protest.It's just....well how much more can they take from the people.There's nothing left for them.Politicians need to cut back,really far back because it's a slap in the face for the average working Joe.The politicians haven't realized they are supposed to work FOR THE PEOPLE not the businesses that want the low wages and organized crime.

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    3. Keep American out of Mexico we don't need ur money. Come home brothers.

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    4. I believe they should be paid in dollar minimum of $15

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    5. I agree America should stay out of Mexico. And a wall and a strong border to stem the illegal flow of poison which Mexico floods American cities and destroying society. Maybe if the garbage stops America can heal. But wait: that means no money going back to Mexico. Hmmmm. With a market closed here for revenue what will Mexicos government officials feed off of.
      Until Mexico can curtail all the poison coming in to the United States of America and the immunity given to these criminals to continue to operate freely. Then maybe there will be a common interest to work together. 10 years of a drug war were mere farmers seem to get the upper hand and mocking the judicial system of Mexican government. This needs to stop . Poor citizens need to rid of an inept government who works for the cartels than its constituents.

      Delete
    6. 3:47 you express beautifully your views, but if they can't be taught to american politicians with all their real schooling and real university degrees and doctorates, imagine teaching that in mexico where MAO osorio chón and epn bought their professional titles in a mexican flea market...

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    7. Canadiana, it took 15 years for the minimum wage in mexico to get increased to $2.99 dollars A DAY, about $37,50 pesos before devaluation...
      --after devaluation minimum wage still is $37.50 PESOS, but in dollars it is LESS than 2 DOLLARS a day,
      --the only way to get some real minimum wage increase it to let it all go to hell and become a migrant refugee for minimum wage on the US, and advertise your quinciañera on the Web to get rich like a webon the easy way for a week or two...
      The maquiladoras pay more to the agencies and the politicians than to the workers per the day or by the hour...they may get rich faster selling tacos de cucarachas from a taco truck outside trump tower...

      Delete
  28. AMLO for president

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  29. el problema es que peña nieto le regala a extrajeros el petroleo y los extranjeros le venden la gasolina cara y peña triplica los precios

    ReplyDelete
  30. Peña Nieto burned in Mexico http://menytimes.blogspot.mx/2017/01/palacio-nacional-queman-y-decapitan-epn.html

    ReplyDelete
  31. No MAMES wacho what a fuckin video man........ damnnnnnnm that's some cold shit, and so fucking true. Man. That's fucking sad, and a shame. I feel sad for Mexico today. Pinches ratas hijas de su Puta madre, sucking my México dry.

    ReplyDelete
  32. They charge You about 1.35€ per liter in Germany. Per liter NOT per gallon. And 80% Are taxes.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Peña Nieto Talks about the future of Mexico https://s27.postimg.org/p07eyyt6b/pe_nieto.jpg

    ReplyDelete
  34. And the best way pa taparle el ojo al macho is Mexican Soccer season has started again

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yea, now that the quinseanera in San Luis potosi is old news. For months that's all the Spanish news would talk about. The media is defenetly controlled by gov.

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  35. What will Mexico become if Trump has its way. Automotive industry which is a large business for Mexico seems to be in peril. The peso has devalued since Trumps victory. Future investments have seem to hinder due to uncertainty. Social and political unrest due to many factors, drug war , escalated violence and crime and government corruption. Perfect storm is brewing for a revolution.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More people will join criminal groups and do criminal things to put food in the table. Or in this case gas in the car. LOL.

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    2. We r strong people. We build a fine Coche

      Delete
  36. Thanks Wachito. Wonderful video .... informative and entertaining.... loved the vampire sucking the lifeblood of Ms Mejico.

    Mexico-Watcher
    Are these rioting manifestations the early stages of a violent Mexican revolution?
    I think these players will all participate in deciding:
    1a. The elite oligarchs(business, industrialists, landowners,etc);
    1b. The Army and Marina;
    2. The common folks, vigilante groups, paramilitary patriots;
    3. The criminal organizations (drug cartels);
    4. Ex-patriots Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in the USA;
    5. The Catholic Church;
    6. Certain intellectuals and charismatic activists;
    of
    I don't have a crystal ball, but I see a foreboding signs of tremendous unrest for Mexico because the poisons of systemic violence, corruption, and oppression of millions of Mexicans cannot be continue without consequences.

    I am sure that we in the USA will not escape the bad consequences of the collapsing nation of Mexico. I am also convinced that our government and military are preparing or already have contingency plans for what "might" unfold in Mexico.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Imagine, no payments on the foreign debt, or a total default,
      that is going to happen anyway...
      --all the big fat cats will be starving, and planning to go medieval about their turfs. ..

      Delete
    2. As some of us know'You reap what you sow' reads loud and clear with these protests and eh 'Karma's a bitch' and you can fool some of the people but not all of the people.I think you are totally right in that last sentence too.It could get crazy with 120 million people and hey what is the gov going to do?Mow down the whole population?They would have sanctions slapped on them so fast and they would go down with their country.Then again if they don't get the protests under control investment pulls out,tourism pulls out,etc.etc.Good to see you bad MW.Your comments are so insightful.

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    3. MW-I meant good to see you back not bad.

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  37. Now we know what trumps visit with pena nieto was about

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  38. We should just appoint Joaquin El Chapo Guzman as Prime Minister of Mexico. I believe he has the fix to our problems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 5:24 that I AGREE TO, why agree with pendejadas?

      Delete
  39. Lol Pena Nieto knows he has nothing to worry about. People will protest for a few days, and then he knows it will settle and he can enjoy another year of having most people like him because he speaks charismatically to them and does well with international relations. And then he'll retire with all the money. He has nothing to worry about. What a dick.

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  40. @2:51AM

    You are totally right my friend...That and Maria la del barrio crap have people fooled in Mexico.. I visited mexico back in September and I asked my female cousins and aunts which I have A LOT who they voted for president I'm the last elections I was angry to find out they voted for NIETO.... BECAUSE HE IS A HANDSOME GUY... PISSED ME OFF SO BAD NOW I KNOW WHY MEXICO IS AS IT IS....

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  41. @ 8:32PM

    Hahaha.. I spent Christmas with my brothers and some cousins in Indiana and my cousins were like are you going to Ruby's 15s? I asked who was Ruby and they started making fun of me because EVERYONE KNOWS ABOUT RUBY EXCEPT ME... I felt stupid for not knowing about it but then when I read about it I find out how her father treats the poor made me angry that she became so famous and she had rich people helping her pay for her stupid party. When someone really needs help from the wealthy for health reasons or starving to death people look the other way. So makes me angry how messed up people are in Mexico I love mexico because I have lots of family there and my parents are both Mexican nationals. I am so sad about this crap.

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  42. I really do think someone needs to assasinate Mr. Nieto in order for something to drastically change Mexico

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  43. @dd

    I like all your comments and would like to know your opinion on a couple things.

    Will NIETO be impeached??
    Will Mexico keep depending on USA for their economy? Will Mexico ever stand up to USA?

    I remember Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez ... they would never allow this to happen... Will we ever have a real leader?

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  44. @1:53 Thank you, glad you like them. In answer to our questions;
    EPN will never be impeached. That would be to big of an embarrassment for PRI. But if the powers that be ever decide that his continuance in office may be a greater embarrassment and permanently damage PRI Nieto might come down with some debilitating disease that would force him to resign. With his approval ratings hovering in the 20% range and people demonstrating and in some cases rioting in the streets that time may be near. And I think this time is different because the people are irate over something (fuel price increases) that is hitting them in the pocket book and affecting them directly - not just "seeking justice" or "stop corruption" or "education reform" that PRI knows that the protestors outrage will fade in a month or 2. If EPN doesn't go along with the idea of getting sick and resigning, if I were him I would be very wary of flying or doing anything where a tragic accident could happen.

    If (and that is a big if) wages would go up sufficiently that a worker make a living to support his family and have a few pesos left over as disposable income, Mexico could be less dependent on exports to the US.

    Only time will tell if Mexico will ever stand up to US. Trump says Mexico will pay for his wall he wants to build. Fox may have summed up the Mexican people's attitude when he said "Mexico will never pay for that f..king wall". It's going to interesting to see what happens.

    As to having a "real leader", as you know change is slow in Mexico. But i think it is moving in the direction of more people involvement in politics (not just the big 3 running things, but a people's movement. I can see a "real leader" rising out of that people's movement.

    But my hopes for the improvement of living conditions for more than half the country rest on a complete rethinking of the policy behind the "war on drugs" and develop policies that will treat drug usage as a health problem, not a crime. There are several countries that could be model for such a policy and i think I see a movement by the people in both the US and Mexico in that direction. It will take time for the governments of US and Mx. to do that, but I think it will happen. Just look at how the majority of people in US feel about pot compared to a decade ago.

    My answers are just my personal views and I know each one is debatable, so all you readers have at it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DD, State the conditions of the debate before we have at it...
      I ASK VERY RESPECTFULLY THAT NOTHING BE "SACRED COW STUFF"
      that is the least we owe our dead and the dying.

      Delete
    2. @12:05 The conditions for the debate are set out in the policy statement the link to which is on the front page in the box titled "Want to contribute"

      Here is a except from the policy page but I would strongly recommend that all readers read the entire policy statement before they start commenting
      Excerpt:
      "Borderland Beat aims to provide a constructive community forum where readers can write in a civil way. The best comments and posts are those that add more information to the story, express a different viewpoint or help create intelligent debate. We certainly encourage constructive debate, but we will most likely delete comments that are off topic, offensive, contain personal attacks or comments that don't further the conversation."

      Delete
  45. @dd

    Thanks for giving me your opinion on all my questions. I would like to say I am not disappointed on your answers thanks a lot!

    Chito

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  46. Watch as Pena Nieto and PRI steal more money than Carlos Salinas ever stole when he was president! The increased gas price at the Pemex gas pump is a way of distracting the attention of the Mexican population from the real crime that is going on right now behind closed doors! The president and his party (PRI) are stealing money from the government at a level unheard of since Salinas was president. Just watch and remember these words because the details of this theft are not know yet to the public, but as sure as I lived over 15 years in Mexico as a business man I am sure that the only way that Pena Nieto is allowing the unrest to happen is because he needs the distraction of the people so he can steal more money from the government before his presidency term ends!

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  47. You could be right.i have a gut feeling that corruption there is on onprecedented levels never before seen.I just wonder though what will be the consequences of all that 'overthieving' to the country as a whole?Does it go bankrupt?Does investment stop?What happens to the peso?Does Mexico get a bailout?What happens to the people?Can it get any worse?Do the politicians bail out of the country with their Panama bank accounts intact?

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  48. Finally a real president who will protect American interests, we don't want the corruption and death spilling over the border any more than it has already, I hope we get rid of sanctuary cities. We love you guys who move here legally, but its time for all those who are cutting in line to move here the right way.

    ReplyDelete

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