Sunday, January 3, 2016

Mayor of Temixco Assassinated a Day after Taking Office




Translated by Valor for Borderland Beat

The government of Morelos made the announcement that the 33-year-old mayor, Gisela Mota Ocampo, had been murdered inside her home in Temixco just hours after she had been sworn in as mayor of the city. Mota had won the election for mayor last June and was sworn in on New Year’s Day.

On Saturday morning around 7:30 a.m., an armed group entered Mota's home, beat her and then shot her in the head. Paramedics arrived at 7:50 a.m. and confirmed she was dead.

Local reports say that after committing the crime, the assailants fled in a vehicle but local police pursued them killing two of the alleged killers in the chase.

The other two involved were arrested.

Morelos authorities announced that in addition to the two dead, there are a total of three detained, among them a minor, for the murder of the mayor of Temixco.

At a press conference, the Commissioner of Public Security in Morelos, Alberto Campella Ibarra, reported that among the three people arrested, there was a minor, an 18 year old man, and a 32 year old woman.


Accompanied by the attorney general of the state, Javier Pérez Durón, the commissioner explained that policemen affiliated with the Mando Único (Unified Command) carried out a search operation and tracked down those responsible.

According to Campella, during the persecution, the cops were attacked by the suspected murderers of Gisela Mota, so the policemen repelled the attack and killed two of the assailants.
Two vehicles, weapons, and cartridges were secured and presented to the attorney general’s office.

In a press release, the government of Morelos reported that a security protocol was implemented for the mayors of the state, including Cuernavaca, after the attack that led to the death of Gisela Mota.

The governor of Morelos, Graco Ramírez, also highlighted the meeting on Saturday afternoon between Graco Ramírez and Cuauhtémoc Blanco Bravo.

The governor assured the mayor of Cuernavaca that he has the support of the state government in regards to the issue of public safety.

In recent weeks, the governor sustained a confrontation with the mayor of Cuernavaca, Cuauhtémoc Blanco Bravo, in regards to the police.  The state government withdrew weapons and even radios from the security forces of Blanco, after the mayor should terminate the agreement with the Mando Único.  Yesterday, even the state governor called the former footballer “arrogant”.

On Saturday, members of the Counicl of Temixco announced three days of mourning for the murder of the municipal mayor and demanded that the government clarify the facts.

Meanwhile, the national leader of the PRD, Agustín Basave, lamented the murder of Gisela Mota, demanded justice, and sent out his condolences to the family of Gisela.



Gisela Mota was a member of the Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD), close to the former presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador, until he resigned from his party after the defeat at the polls in 2012, and founded his own political group, the National Regeneration Movement (MORENA).

From then on, Mota remained independent from the group of Graco Ramírez, and won the internal election of the PRD candidate for the mayor of Temixco, supported by the governor.

Mota, who was a federal representative from 2012 to 2015, held several positions in the PRD, including Secretary of Youth Affairs in Temixco, Secretary of Political Training in Morelos, Secretary of Democratic Education and Political Training of the National Executive Committee, and national councilor of the PRD party.

She also maintained an active presence in social networks where she promoted various causes, highlighting the need for justice and the reappearance of the 43 normalistas of Ayotzinapa who were disappeared in September 2014 in Iguala, Guerrero.

Gisela Mota’s murder came a day after the so called Operation Delta was launched in various areas of the state, with greater presence in Cuernavaca and Tierra Calienta, in coordination with the Federal Police.  The municipality of Temixco, where she was murdered, is part of the metropolitan area governed by Cuauhtémoc Blanco.

Alberto Capella, reported in a video posted on Facebook that the operation began operating on Friday in Cuernavaca and other municipalities in the state.

He also explained that with the start of “Operation Delta, a significant number of forces who were already working in the municipality of Cuernavaca and thanks to the request made to the governor of the state in previous days, there are around 300 Federal Police forces who are circulating throughout the state.”


$500,000 Peso Bounty on Temixco Mayor

One detainee reportedly stated to the authorities that they were paid $500,000 pesos ($29,062 USD) for the assassination of Temixco Mayor, Gisela Mota Ocampo, according to an official with the District Attorney of Morelos who spoke with Reforma.

Meanwhile, other sources claimed to El Universal that members of the criminal group Los Rojos were behind the assassination.

Reforma published this morning that according to initial statements to ministerial agents by one of the detainees, they were paid 500,000 pesos.  It is not specified whether the amount was for each sicario or for the entire group.

In addition, the suspect told officers during his transfer from Temixco to Cuernavaca, that the order was to only assassinate the mayor, and there were more than six names, not yet revealed, who were people that planned the attack.

Meanwhile, El Universal detailed that according to data that they had access to, the commando that carried out the attack was made up of members of the cartel “Los Rojos”.  They added that the district attorney’s office of the state is analyzing a video which shows the moment that the crime was carried out.

It also indicates that the murder of the mayor is linked to another murder committed on December 31, when a dismembered body was found along the México-Acapulco highway.

Violence in Morelos

The administration governed by Graco Ramírez closed the year with one of the highest homicide rates in the country.  According to the figures from the Executive Secretariat of the National System of Public Security, up to November 30, 2015, Morelos registered a 23.17% rate of homicides per 100,000 inhabitants, the fourth highest in Mexico.  The state is located just below Guerrero, with a rate of 51.12%, Sinaloa with 30.36%, and Chiapas with 23.80%.

In addition, the homicide rate of Morelos registered in November 2015 already exceeded that of 2014, where it registered 21.92%.

Overall, Morelos accounted, from January to November 2015, 45,629 alleged crimes, according to the same figures.  That is the 7th highest state with the highest figure, just below the State of Mexico (186,713), the Federal District (155,713), Baja California (96,382), Puebla (59,808), Chihuahua (56,794), and Tabasco (52,866).

The crime with the most victims in Morelos during 2015 was robbery with and without violence, as they accounted for at least 18,820.  In addition, 4,311 injuries were reported either by stabbing or by a firearm.

Meanwhile, according to official data, in 11 months in 2015, there were 819 people killed; at least 28 kidnappings, 1,648 cases of fraud, 167 cases of extortion, and at least 375 rapes.

Regarding the extortion rate per 100,000 inhabitants, Morelos was ranked third with 8.70 below 9.01 with Nuevo Leon and Jalisco with 9.78.

Regarding kidnappings, the state was placed in fourth place with 1.46.  Guerrero, Tabasco, and Tamaulipas occupied the top places.

A study released in 2015 by the Citizen Council for Public Security and Criminal Justice indicated that Cuernavaca had replaced Acapulco as the most violent city in Mexico, and with Morelos, adjacent to Mexico City, has the highest rate of violence among the 31 Mexican States and Federal District.

However, these figures have not dented the state governor from voicing his presidential aspirations for 2018.

Sources: Sin EmbargoSin Embargo

46 comments:

  1. Worthless scumbags. Death is too good for them.

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  2. Second wave of violence is coming CJNG vs SINALOA CARTEL

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    Replies
    1. Chapo is weak, he will lose

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    2. I thought Sinaloa Cartel and the CJNG were working together. What happened?

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    3. You will loose for going against greatness. Week azz

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  3. This was not a narco generated hit, not at day 2 in office, most likely it was ordered by a political opponent.

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    1. Mexico is a war zone. It aint about drugs its about controling geoghraphic space drugs aint nothing more than a source of revenue

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    2. I heard she had promised to crack down on organized crime though...seems more likely anyway

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    3. What are they sore losers down there[killing their opponents or life is dirt cheap,probably both]?$29,000 is a good chunk of change down there.I would have trouble coming up with that amount just to eliminate the competition.Of course I would be more proud to win it honestly fair and square.

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    4. "War zone" war against unarmed mexicans...
      --how can that be a war?
      --I think that is mass murder and genocide, with politicians and their goons attacking the population, to hold on to power...

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    5. isn't that what i said about that mexico is a warzone. 3 wars are occuring in Mexico

      1. cartels vs cartels

      2. cartels vs Mexican armed forces

      3. Cartels exploiting the people trough extortian and kidnapping

      I am making a statement here

      The Mexican drug war ain't about drugs. Its about controling geoghraphic space. Drugs are just a source of revenue.

      And like in most wars the victims are the innoncent working class people.

      greetings from a guy who loves mexico and its people

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    6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Drug_War

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    7. I agree with my chivis ,it has all the ingredients of a hit from a hater 'cause they didn't just smoked her,these animals beat her up first,cowards with capital letters for real.

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    8. Es que no se dejaba degollar, pinchis metiches necessitan aprender a dejar la politica a los "rateros profesionales", que no saben mas que robar desde una position en el gobierno para "privatizar" los centavos del pueblo...

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    9. Agree with Doña Chivis and with 5:04. Also, think this is about the politics of mining. May this brave woman rest peacefully...

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    10. Graco ramirez is proving himself a murderer with no regrets, ingredient #1 to be "presidentiable" in mexico, as eruviel Avila and Puebla governor have proven, otherwise, the US will not consider them qualified...

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  4. This was a first.Police actually caught the guilty.They should have butchered them alive.See where the 500k got them

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    1. You don't know for sure the dead and the arrested were the real "kidnappers". The mexican police seem to be ready with the convicted and the confessed once again, once too often, again, it looks "prefabricated", to avoid later conspiracy theories about the government being the murderers, the kidnappers, the conspirators or the extortionists, which is the case 1000% of the time...

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    2. @12:28, good call, right on the $

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  5. So what's the motive? If the pendejo can give out info about the bounty why isn't he giving up a motive for the assassination? Sounds like a inside government job to me.

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    1. 7:06pm
      Think a little bit. He knows about the bounty but wasn't told about the motive. Lot of variables could be at work, don't jump to conclusions.

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    2. If the witness starts saying "Cuauhtemoc Blancol" los mandó a matar a la muchacha, todos le van a creer mas, y graco se quita dos Piedras del zapato de un chingazo, after all he wants to be presidente de mexico, and being a proven murderer and genocida proves his abilities, like eruviel Avila, el pelon moreira, rafael moreno valle, or other more worthy priistas, mario marin, fidel herrera, viejidio cantu, los duartes, or other governors...

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    3. Use your brain 10:47. In Mexico the plots are that deep or complex. It is pretty transparent when a hit is committed who is behind them. Mexico Cartel sicarios aren't the sharpest tools in the shed and they need master to tell them what to do. It's obvious that this was a political hit.

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    4. You basically agree with me.

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    5. 3:56am
      Re-read my comment, you inadvertently agree with me so your in dire need of your own advice.

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    6. I agree to disagree 6:35.

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    7. 9:10pm
      I wrote there are a lot of variables and that sicarios are not always privy to everything. You agreed with that by writing that plots are deep, complex and that sicarios aren't sharp. You have problems with reading comprehension.

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  6. This isn't surprising. Protection racket style extortion is rampant in Cuernavaca and most of the neighboring communities. It's endemic; and has been part of the communities social and economic fabric for some time. This isn't new in Cuernavaca with the criminals paying the police and politicians off. I personally have spoken to one business professional who left the community he grew up in and started a business. He and his family left because of the relentless criminal racketeering that goes unchecked. He and his family were threatened harm unless he paid what was demanded. Fed up with the constant demands for money he and his family packed their bags, closed their business and left town. This young mayor who promised to 'clean up the town'... well someone very high up likely ordered the hit on her and it was efficiently carried out. The two perps were killed so they won't be doing any talking.. the other two... a woman and a kid... possibly forced to go for the ride for cover, so who knows?

    This crime will ride the worlds headlines for a while, and just like the 54 dead students cursory investigations will be made... but little will happen when there is so much big money available to keep things on the quiet. Not so far away in Jalisco, a hotel keeper was shot in the head in cold blood by a 'guest'... the perp walked and remains free.... the police or maybe the government itself either doesn't care or is afraid of the power of the criminal elements... either way we have the makings of a failed State om the offing.

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    1. You might have nailed that 1 on the head.

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    2. 7:35 The power of the criminal elements does not exist, compare them hiding, illegal, can not travel freely anywhere, with the power of the polesia nazional, mando unico, soldiers everywhere, and marinas, polisia judicial federal, preventiva, ministerial, antisecuestro, antimotines, and the private paramilitary, local and from blackwater...
      --how the hell are the narcos buying or manipulating the poor mexican governing narco-mierdocracia anywhere?
      --the narcos are nothing but another tool to stick it to the mexican people, too much propaganda blaming the "narcos"

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    3. He did except for 2 thangz:
      This crime won't ride headlines worldwide (u serious?)
      They weren't 54 students,they were 43 students plus 6 more that the world seems to have forgotten about.
      Other than that it was just another day,another crime.
      From Chiraq.

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    4. The famous ones are 43 DISAPPEARED, MONDRAGON AND HIS SMILE FACE.COURTESY OF MEX-GOB AND 3 MORE STUDENTS DEAD DO NOT COUNT...three other civilians do not count
      --ONE THAT SEEMS TO HAVE BEEN A MEXICAN SOLDIER INFILTRATED BUT GONE WITH THE WIND ANYWAY, NO TIME TO INVESTIGATE...
      --43 disappeared we are demanding to be returned alive is what got the mexican governing narco-mierdocracia all fully dipped in their own shit and "verdad historica" cow pie...

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    5. 2:34 This made the US and Canada news already.

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    6. and the UK made the news too so I would say worldwide now.

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  7. Rojos=Reds/red? right?..or strawberry?..Sorry took German in HS(a lot of good that did me..)
    So The Reds? The Strawberry's? or something else?
    Which cartel? Gulf or Zetas or CJNG or X?

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    1. El cartel de graco ramirez, governor of the state, dispenser of "mando unico proteccion" for $$$ extorted from the municipal governmets, 'o plata o plomo' government politics...
      --mando unico police ain't leavin' no stone unturned in their quest fo' mo' money, they expensive nazi training in france must pay off for the heirs of POLICE CAPTAIN JESUS MIYAZAWA, who went to live and work there after getting luis cardenas palomino out of his.murder charges...
      --look, just for 1 minute, Bertie Boy Moreira is not affraid to live in morelos state, why?
      --SAM GIANCANNA left a good mafia model there since the 60's when he hid there for a while because of "family business" of la Cosa Nostra...

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  8. Narcos knew this chick wasn't going to be on the take. So, tas tas tas tas tas... All of this shit is narco related, right off or down the road a piece, it's all the same shit.

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    1. 1:18 political crime, she was not going to be extorted as a municipal officer, she was not dealing drugs, and she still believed in the politics of her party that apparently has come to believe on sompim' else...
      --morelos state legislature even approve billion dollar loans to their municipios for televisa propaganda and international ads, fairs, expositions, rodeos and all that bullshit, not everybody deals drugs, GÜEY, take your dunce hat and go back to the corner.

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    2. If, the narcos felt she was a threat, the woman wouldn't have made it through her election campaign. MANDA UNICA possesses even less honor than the cartels do and that's saying something...

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  9. smdh at new mayors getting executed....
    mexico = iraq/syria

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    1. That's the real fear.

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  10. Mexican politics! Aggressive negotiations!

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  11. Why are small rural states like Chiapas and Tabasco the leaders in murders? Is it just the fluid nature of the cartel presence mixed with weak fuerzas rurales?

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    1. 5:26, Answer: Gold, mining companies, precious metals and resource mineral, more pipelines operating and slated for construction. The drug war's smoke and mirrors.

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  12. Theory: New mayor not corrupt enough for the corrupt police department, so they(police)tell their narco buddies to assassinate the mayor. Police are never around when they are needed, but in this case they were magically "right there" and got into it with the "bad guys" . . . this too was staged between cops and narcos, and the one killed is some lacky fall guy or inept underling that the narcos wanted to kill anyway.

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    Replies
    1. 12:56 ...and this time we are all lucky the escaping narcos (turned kidnappers) did not kill any pursuing police officers by shooting them on their backs while riding their high speed mopeds...

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