Tuesday, September 15, 2015

40 years ago the US sent Mexico into a financial crisis — and it transformed the narcotics industry

Borderland Beat posted by DD republished from Business Insider



In this excerpt from A Narco History: How the United States and Mexico Jointly Created the Mexican Drug War, coauthors Carmen Boullosa and Mike Wallace explain how the US and Mexico jointly created the Mexican Drug War.

 In the mid 1970s, the United States had added to its woes of recession those of inflation, due in considerable measure to OPEC’s success in raising oil prices.

To “whip inflation now,” the Federal Reserve Bank helmed by Chairman Paul Volcker began to raise interest rates, eventually driving the prime rate from 12 percent to 21 percent.

By 1980, this had precipitated a far deeper downturn, which did lower inflation, but only by driving up unemployment to levels not seen since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

The recession Volcker engineered in the US had an even more devastating impact on Mexico, as the interest rate on rolling over its short term loans nearly doubled.

By 1982, simply meeting interest payments would have required more than $8 billion per year. Worse, just as expenses soared, oil prices sagged.

Mexico made clear it could no longer make its interest payments.

US banks were terrified. Thirteen of the biggest stood to collectively lose $60 billion if Mexico went under — 48 percent of their combined capital.

And if Mexico fell, most of Latin America would come tumbling down behind it, likely triggering a collapse of the entire international financial system. The United States, accordingly, put together a multi-billion-dollar package of loans and credits, and worked out an unofficial debt moratorium.


 The World Bank and IMF were wheeled in to provide Mexico with emergency loans with which to resume paying the US banks, rescuing them from their own recklessness. These institutions in turn — following the model first worked out in New York’s fiscal crisis in 1975 — now imposed “structural adjustment” on Mexico.
Three boys in the street read a newspaper announcing better salaries for Mexican workers November 16, 1993 as Mexico anxiously awaits the outcome of a crucial vote in the US congressional session on the North American Free Trade Agreement.
 The creditors demanded privatization of public services, cuts in government social programs, a wider opening to foreign investment, and a ruthless concentration on paying back loans and interest. This arm-twisting was given an ideological gloss, reviving hoary shibboleths about the inherent superiority of market over state, repackaged as “neoliberalism.”

Executing these demands fell first to President de la Madrid and then to his successor Carlos Salinas de Gortari (1988–1994). Both believed the state apparatus was a burden upon Mexican business that should be thrown off, along with much else in the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) inherited project and ideology. Structural adjustment prompted privatization, the opening of the country to foreign investment, and the reorientation of the agricultural sector towards exports.
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari waves to the crowd after he gave his 6th State of the Nation address before the Mexican Congress, November 1, in Mexico City
 The 1980s were known as la Década Perdida, or “lost decade,” wherein 800,000 jobs evaporated and dispossessed farmers streamed into urban centers.

Salinas continued the policies, selling off large public enterprises at bargain basement prices. The process created a new class of Mexican tycoons. In 1987 there was one Mexican on the Forbes billionaire list. When Salinas left office in 1994 there were twenty-four.

Labor, conversely, was battered. When public enterprises were privatized their collective agreements were scrapped, benefits removed, “flexible” work rules imposed. Salinas also distanced the party from its long-affiliated labor unions, and ordered a series of attacks on more militant entities.

Various unemployed Mexicans offer their skills as handymen, fixing everything from light bulbs to toilets, by Mexico City's Metropolitan Cathedral October 30, 1995.
 At the same time, state subsidies that had kept the price of basic foodstuffs low were suddenly removed. The price of milk, tortillas, petrol, electricity and public transport shot up at the same time wages were being slashed. The provision of basic social services was similarly cut so that fewer people had access to free health care and education.

The neoliberal offensive was particularly devastating to farm labor, partly as a consequence of the establishment of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) (which Salinas negotiated with George H. W. Bush, and which went into effect under Bill Clinton).

A principal US condition for entering the agreement was that Mexico undo the agrarian reforms embedded in Article 27 of the Constitution, a principal legacy of the Revolution. Communal land could now be divided and converted into private property. Price regulation of staple crops was scrapped. Tariffs and quotas on agricultural imports were removed. Subsidies that had supported small-scale farmers were deleted
US President George H. Bush offers a toast to his host, Mexican President Carlos Salinas during a luncheon in Monterrey on November 27, 1990.
The results of establishing a putatively equal trade between grossly unequal partners was that US agribusiness pushed thousands of Mexican farmers out of their own markets.

The price of corn dropped by around 50 percent after the NAFTA agreement, and the number of farmers living in poverty rose by a third. In the six years following the introduction of NAFTA, two million farmers abandoned their land. They flocked from country shacks to the burgeoning barrios of Mexico City; to the spreading slums of Tijuana and Ciudad Juárez to work in factories across the border.


The crisis transformed the narcotics industry.
Indeed it is impossible to understand the tremendous changes in the drug business during the combined sexenios of Salinas and Zedillo (1989–2000) without taking into account the massive political, economic, and ideological transformations wrought during that decade and the previous one by the PRI-governed state.

Farmers, unable to sustain themselves due to the removal of subsidies and the arrival of competition from US agri-corporations, found the burgeoning market for marijuana and poppies their only avenue to surviving on the land. The army of the urban unemployed gave the cartels a deep pool from which to recruit foot soldiers, and the miserably paid (and eminently corruptible) police and military provided the muscle with which to protect their interests.


The spread of everyday crime — aided by the rapid declension and corruption of local police forces — demoralized civil society, and provided a climate within which grander forms of criminality would flourish.
 
The adoption of free trade, and the deeper integration of the Mexican economy with that of the United States, dramatically increased cross-border traffic, making it far easier to insert narcotics into the stream of northward-bound commodities.
 
Some NAFTA rules were of particular help: because factory workers were exempt from tariffs and subject to only minimal inspections, Mexican smugglers began buying up such factories to use as fronts for shipping cocaine.
A Mexican soldier stands guard as over one ton of Colombian cocaine goes up in smoke on the Carribean island of Cozumel in the southern Mexican state of Quintana Roo February 27, 1997.
 Narcotrafficking had formerly been integrated into the PRI corporatist state, an under-the-table equivalent of labor, peasant, and business organizations. As such it was subject to a certain degree of regulatory control, and to unofficial taxation, in return for the de facto licensing of smuggling.

The state’s abandonment of this form of corporatist inclusion contributed to the independent growth and power of organized crime syndicates.


The glorification of wealth and entrepreneurialism provided a cultural environment that boosted the social standing of narco businessmen.

As in the former Soviet Union and other post-communist regimes, a neoliberal shock treatment simultaneously produced millionaires and gangsters, a twinning that Forbes registered by including them on the same list.
A soldier carries blocks of cocaine to a pile for incineration at a naval base in Matamoros, in Tamaulipas state April 29.
 The weakening of the state and the glorification of “free enterprise” conferred authority and legitimacy on the private sector in which drug traffickers were now key players. As Peter Watt and Roberto Zepeda have argued, neoliberals prioritized accumulation of profit over social welfare, ruthless competition over cooperation, and the sanctification of private property and wealth over community and civic responsibility.

These propositions — the cornerstones and guiding principles of free-market ideology — also formed the dominant ideology of crime syndicates.

63 comments:

  1. Amazing, yet another example of how Mexico refuses to accept blame for their problems. It's easy to throw America under the bus, they aren't here to protect themselves.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 2:38 it is even more amazing how you refuse to accept the FACTS for what they are.
      And it is a pity that the Animal Protection Society does not allow us putting the garbage where it belongs...
      --dd GOOD POST! FULL OF DRUG TRAFFICKING TRUTHS IN THE MIX...
      A+++☆☆☆☆☆ =E is for excellent

      Delete
    2. Sure Mexico has its problems because of the US . We should cut all ties with Mexico and the people from there . May then they could prosper in peace . I think the British is the big problem in the US . Probably wouldn't have any problems if their damn musicians hadn't came over in the 60's . That one singing that song about cocaine and all .
      GET A GRIP MEXICANS . We give and give and you still continue to blame us . Leave us alone then .

      Delete
    3. .their ONLY avenue was to grow marijuana and poppies or become foot soldiers.??!! Hey we all have hard times but don't be fooled Mexicans are responsible for their actions. Just like everyone else...
      if I get laid off is it the company.who let me go responsible for me robbing a bank.??!! This is a cop out..why wont you just admit., they were having a hard time., saw an easy opportunity. To make. $$and they took it.!trying to blame US economic. Policy. For Mexicans CHOOSING to traffic. Drugs is classic. Blame shifting.... sick of people dogging the US we do more humanitarian aid wise than any other country out there...

      Delete
    4. 4:17 you are one prolific POS hijo de puta, just because you get laid and paid good it does not mean that everybody else benefits or is happy being a house boy...
      --There are tons of books, reports, videos, photos to illuminate your vast magnificent ignorance about who benefits from drug trafficking, weapons dealings wars for profit, crooked banking even not for profit charities that produce untaxable gigantic profits to their "owners" because they are, well, "not for profit"...
      --And that is before we start mentioning countries names...
      --ever hear about The Big White Lie? It is about the CIA, cocaine and the crack epidemic...
      --Michael levine, Héctor Berrellez, Celerino Castillo, Gary webb, gladly testify for you, and there are thousand others, about things you obviously know nothing...

      Delete
    5. 11:21 & 4:17 EXACTLY. No wonder that country is like it is right now. Every body down there is full of jalapeño shiet. All the bad shiets they do is never their responsability. Smht'...

      Delete
    6. These are the opinions of two people, not 'Mexico'

      Delete
    7. So, here I am sitting in Germany looking at a globe... and from here ... believe it or not...it looks as if... MEXICO...actually... IS part of AMERICA...holly facking molly. .. must be the stellar MDMA blurring my vision

      Delete
    8. There is a difference between facing the truth and blaming. It is the truth that the U.S. arms and trains military officers from The Kaibiles of Guatemala and Gafe in Mexico to Filipino and Korean Special Forces. We also train the bankers and professional classes in Mexico and around the world in our Academic Institutions. It's just a fact...truth. Look into most countries history's from the Mid East, Africa and Latin America especially and you will see US military involvement. No other country's name will pop up more. Just a fact. The American government imposes a loan shark predatory foreign policy and the world feels it. It gets you to wave the flag all the while passing horrible legislation. But then again many of you believe in the Dem vs Rep type system we have and so nothing changes. So year in and out they run the same game on us all. After all why should they change anything look at how u are defending them or apologizing for them.

      Delete
  2. In a few words, the USA caused all this narco shit including a massive migration of illegals....I wondered what would have happened if my old man never moved to the USA? ? Probably or most likely i would have been really poor , or death.... I guess the good old red white and blue does work in mysterious ways....it creates wealth and poor people at the same time...it's like they manipulate the economic system creating wars , allowing drugs to come into the country to keep the cops employed ,the social workers busy, the politics rolling and the industry running. ...im just glad I was able to open up my eyes to what america really is....a money making opportunity....make your cash and stash it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Capitalism is a machine whose motor runs on people and resources, better theirs than yours.

      Delete
    2. These s.o.b.s need to be locked up immediatly damn it. Freackin ridiculous that ive been supporting the usa damn it. I should be freackin ashamed of myself for being a jackass and im being serious not sarcastic damn it. These sick bastards are trying to make money off central america by making it a portal to hell. These jackasses should be hung from a damn tree damn it you. I could only imagine what that jackass narcissicst Trump has under his sleeve by deporting everyone damn it. Cant you see the b.s. and trumps deceit into making money by deporting people damn it you. Freackin america damn it.

      Delete
  3. There are only two ways to eliminate poverty:
    - Send the poor to the gas chamber or
    - Provide them education, jobs and opportunity

    The former is violent and messy whilst the latter requires that the elite give up some of their priviliges (most importantly corruption).

    It seems as if Mexico is going for the gas chambers with the 'war on drugs'.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i agree it seems nobody cares . mass graves, mass executions , outrageous number of dissapeared, failed prison system , mass shootouts in the street . Mexico is at war and it really looks like the military is only putting down one cartel so that another can take over . fuck im glad to be in America . and all that is going on just south of here . this is 2015 not 1840 . you can smell the blood as soon as you cross into Mexico .

      Delete
    2. sent them to the united states is more moral

      Delete
    3. 3:08pm
      False dichotomy

      Delete
  4. I gotta say I find this extremely biased, and it shows those who wrote it have no damn idea how Mexico was fucked by their own Government, sure the US have a lot to do with the drug war BUT the MX Government is the one responsible for the crisis that hit Mexico in those times, I was young back then, but my father has told me all about it, he lost everything when Lopez Portillo and its protectionist Government corrupted everything, trying to blame only De La Madrid and Salinas is a biased opinion fueled in Mexico by the "left" who really are just former pri cartel members who defected pri to form their own prd cartel when they no longer received support, and now formed morena.

    The free market isnt what caused my country to be so fucked, it was the long standing corruption inherited by the Lopez Portillo administration, just remember negro durazo.

    Anytime I speak with my father about the economy, he complains about EPN, and even Salinas, but says those were baby boys besides Lopez Portillo and friends.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree. The article is sophomoric, uninformed. Like, El Patron Del Mal, written by foreigers, telling a story they don't know. Mexico isn't Latin America, it is a North American country. The premise that if MEX falls, Latin America would collapse is absurd. South America didn't trade with Mexico back then.

      Delete
    2. and what about raul salinas,? ruiz massieu , colosio murders? they are the same atlacomulco team since 1950s

      Delete
    3. Under NAFA I made money I live in the US.

      Delete
    4. 3:21 your father must have been born just yesterday...
      After achieving independence, the continental army reconciled with england, helped screw the french monarchs, and spain, and turned to conquering the rest of the american continent fueled by the Monroe Doctrine, long before daddy and el negro durazo were born...
      --of course you do not find the real history nor the rest of the story on BB or books anywhere just a snippet here and there, they call it Conspiracy Theories to give it a bad name and scare the kooky away...

      Delete
    5. 3:21 You make sense.

      Delete
    6. @10:17 P* to @3:21

      Delete
  5. Many countries were and still are struggling financially, yet they are not killing their own families to get the largest drug field and shipments out. Face it, constantly come up with excuses blaming America for the ignorance towards humanity in Mexico. The only country that believes this crap is Mexico.The financial issue was in the 70's and 80's? Yet the massive murders and killing started at a high rate in 2006? Sounds more like incompetency on Mexico's part. Sitting back blaming others and not putting an end to that crap. Where is the post about the US being responsible for the current corrupt politicians? Hmmm Next week? Next month? We're waiting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. there is no mass murder, only the media exacerbates these things, see deaths from violence in united states in 2015 on google and you will be amazed, it is true that in mexico there are beheadings, 15 or 30 bodies killed in the street etc but those are related criminality, also they dont represent more than half point percent of total population, there are more deaths fromcancer and diabetes yet they dont make the news why?

      Delete
    2. Its always the US fault going back to 1846

      Delete
    3. @9:42 go back to before the colonies independence war, when in the middle of it spain refused to help the insurgents but the french monarchy did help, after independence was achieved, the US kissed and made out with england and turned on the other European countries instigating the independence of LatinAmerica for their benefit...
      --in mexico it was US ambassador Joel Poinsett in the New Spain...before 1810...

      Delete
  6. 3:08 u can't eliminate poverty

    ReplyDelete
  7. Mexico likes to blame its problems on the US rather than fx its own self

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh you mean the way America likes to blame hard work immigrants instead of themselves for their shortcommings?

      Delete
    2. Exactly what short comings do we blame on hard working. Immigrants.? Moron

      Delete
    3. I know cheap MX. labor r being paid $4.00 a hour. What deal for US companies. Bad for US labor. I know US employers who do not care about their working., but some do.

      Delete
  8. CORRUPTION IN MEXICO WENT BIG TIME AFTER WWII, JFK tried with president Adolfo Lopez Mateos to be a friend to mexico and LatinAmerica, with his Alliance For Progess, it was not to be, obviously JFK was murdered by the military/industrial complex Eisenhower warned america about, and it has all been going downhill ever since, the CIA ruining lives all over the world, and the neo-liberalistas conquering minds and hearts with their pitiful lies, tea and BS.creating one "crisis" after the other for their own benefit...
    --"OUR MAN IN MEXICO" AMBASSADOR WIN SCOTT started working it in mexico when lopez Mateos was president, in the late 50's, recruiting mexican politicians for his LITEMPO OPERATION, no sense in looking somewhere else for where it started...
    --We know where it is at now, of course

    ReplyDelete
  9. Everything goes back to when mex sold land to us, imo thats when the north american union started.. The people running mex are fhe same people runing the us. Lets not get caught up in the middle people.. Thats the better trick, they feed you both stories and you get stuck in the middle calling in it the "truth" ..lame

    ReplyDelete
  10. Off topic but important...I heard that Mayo and Chapo are close to going to war between each other. El Licenciado switched sides and want no part of el Chapo's shadow. Supposedly el Chapo's sons didn't get the respect they deserved while their dad was in jail and this pissed off the shorty. I hope this is just b.s. but if its true God have mercy of Sinaloa.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. very wrong my friend, the story is this, the only way to get zambada niebla out of prison was capturing chapo or snitching chapo whereabouts, once chapo was caught niebla got out, but mayo and zambada knew it was just a deal, now mayo took chapo out of prison and gringos are mad.

      Delete
    2. Didn't alot of mayos people fall while chapo was in prison? They almost got el mayo they caught his son el fatty and compadron not sure but who else but yeah I don't kno just asking

      Delete
    3. 9:19 Maybe it was just matter of time for that to happen. It could be the best thing that could happen to shinola, they got to many narcos any facken way. Lower their narco population. They might learn a lesson or two there...

      Delete
    4. 1:52 are you stupid why would he hand himself over to release somebody else's son he didn't do that when they had his son that was tortured he didn't hand himself over then moron

      Delete
  11. The forms of discourse seem to be getting better here (just an opinion), if the blaming stops maybe everybody using this to understand and learn can profit more. One thing, as a person growing in my early life in the States I painfully recognize that the US can easily through to much recklessness in education teach smart young minds to become criminal or ego-manic/psychotic it becomes a major aspect of survival. Of course this can happen anywhere but the Nations at the top should have more responsibility and courage to develop concepts and change, the resources are there. I smile at the saying love it or leave it, it could be love it help change it! What many unheard individuals are doing, being blocked or disrupted often by the change is dangerous for my status quo types. Both Nations Mexico and US have clearly too much sufferings, fears pushed upon the soul of maybe everyone in their own perception. In short change can only come if we personally are willing to change ourselves, mass systems change much slower than individuals. The positive power of one good person is underestimated. Stop finger pointing, 80 or so years is not much time to change life in this chaos that has developed through recklessness. Respect for BB in giving the unheard and the too many silent ones for ever a face.

    ReplyDelete
  12. 40 years ago blah blah blah ... facts on current situation Mexicans slaughtering mexicans . Mexicans dont care . a few do . but those few aint changing nada . Tell me if im lying here with this ; Mexican attitude torwards a failed Mexico " pos pos que hacemos " " el que nada debe nada teme " in other words i dont see nothing dont here nothing dont say nothing ... how the fuck will things change when the young genaration goes bannanas from a dude that sings corridos about beheadings , bazookas and levantones .. jaja keep it classy Mexicans

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 12:02 what keeps things "classy" is the billions of dollars in second hand weapons the US sends to the mexican governing narco-mierdocracia to hold on power, I am sure the american taxpayers here not even paid for such second hand weapons, and after "private contractors" sell them, the US is lucky if they see one cent on the dollar from the sales...
      --the discourse may look good to you, but from here it looks compromised...
      --Queen of the Nile, mexico declares war on ya' ass...

      Delete
  13. The first part of the article blames the United States for action by OPEC in the 1970's. The author overlooks the simple fact; the USA has no control over OPEC. The rise in fuel prices caused by OPEC were proportionally as hurtful to the USA as they were to Mexico, proportional upon how much Mexico depends upon OPEC oil.
    So, how about a little bit of the blame being on the Mexican side of the border. The government of Mexico has the responsibility to look after their own. Sure the USA turned inward when the economy tanked. It was the duty of the USA to look out for the welfare of it's citizens; there is no mandate that it look out for Mexico's people or woes. The US government tried as much as possible to help, but there was simply too much all across the Americas for one nation to carry the whole load. Especially when all about the nations were falling apart from within.
    That said, my closing comment is, the USA didn't bash Mexico about the financial woes or increase in poverty. So why does a writer in Mexico do this to the USA, and with a lot of unfounded accusations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mexican gov. has blame the US it makes the Mexican people feel good. Its just a show by the Mexican politicos.

      Delete
    2. @12:21am
      The article blames Opecs action as a reaction to the United States so it's correct. In your first two sentences you commit a fallacy.

      Delete
  14. Secrets well kept are an impossibility to keep secret, google: vanguard.com.mx El otro equipo de genaro garcia luna...
    --It names his closest associates and some of their shenanigans, but no photos and it is in spanish, i'd love to see Miguel Angel Osorio Chong's main guys on a similar list, there should be there his main henchmen doing his private contracts, as Secretario de Gobernacion he has to have them...

    ReplyDelete
  15. 5 attempts at exhonerating the US right out the bat...
    --Nobody corrupts the US or its puppet countries and satellites like US rogue agents...
    --for the upteenth time, do not mix corrupt amerikkkan crooks and their dirty deeds with the many decent american people who try to do good for all...
    --man up and do not hide behind anybody's petticoats, own your sins...

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your right 9/15-3:21pm. This is a desperate attempt at history revisionism to sell a book on a totally false premise. Just as Venezuela is today, Mexico had a nationalized economy running as inefficiently as the former Soviet Union and with an artificially inflated peso . It was the loss of faith in the pesos value by creditors and currency markets that led to Mexico's inability to meet debt payments, and it was the ultimate privatization of the formerly nationalized industries of Mexico that saved billions from the fraud and waste that the PRI elite had been enjoying for generations. The arguments postulated in this book are ludicrous and the authors are making a desperate attempt to fictionalize history in order to sell their book. These authors have no credibility and appear to be motivated by socialist politics along with their desire to sell their book.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Mexico became the center of US drug shipments when the Caribbean was removed due to AWACS and other air surveillance and such. Had nothing to do with neo-liberalism.

    And it was the Mexican politicos who, after the world economic downturn in the 70's, approached the narcos seeking $$$, because there was less to rob from state coffers. Mexico has never recovered from the 1970's downturn.

    This changed the game and put the narcos in charge. Again, nothing to do with neo-liberalism.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hey I'll take all the blame. Now does it change anything? Lets instead focus on combating these social ills somehow someway.

    ReplyDelete
  19. The rise in fuel prices is probably due to the excessive losses incurred by theft from criminal groups. Someone has to pay for those losses. Oh and for everyone agrreeing the US is to blame, that theft occurred in the past few years, not the 70,s. Lol. Is the blaming helping Mexico at all? Nope!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 12:37 Google: texas companies that bought stolen mexican oil...
      AND SHUT THE FACK UP!!!

      Delete
    2. Blackmarket oil "sold" by the tanker in international waters is en vogue...because no OPEC rules apply, and, the $ goes in and out of numbered bank accounts. Laundering $ through petroleum, ain't that a kick!

      Delete
  20. Los cárteles mexicanos prácticamente controlan los Estados Unidos. La razón por la que el gobierno EE.UU. no va a sellar su frontera es debido a los puestos de trabajo y dinero que perderían si se ponen fuera del negocio de los carteles de la droga y contrabandistas. Todo su sistema bancario se derrumbaría. Los Estados Unidos es su propio peor enemigo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Los carteles mexicanos de la droga o de lo que sea, casi no tienen dinero en los Bancos extranjeros, casi todo el dinero en eso Bancos es propiedad de otros extranjeros, y lo que los narcos o los politicos mexicanos tienen ahi, lo controlan los extranjeros 100% tambien, hasta su muerte, entonces todo pasa a ser propiedad del banco solo que hay sucesor...

      Delete
    2. Ya vajate de esas nubes tlacuache. Ya kisieras ke los carteles de mx controlaran a los Estados Unidos de America. La EUA es la nacion mas poderosa del planeta, hasta el punto ke los mismos mexicanos se matan entre ellos mismos por los dollares. Sin EUA no hay dollar. Aber como le arian esos cartelillos sin los dollares... mx seria un pais de puro granjero campesino, parecido a Centro America. Weysote!

      Delete
  21. i love how butt hurt americans get when you assign them any blame in the drug war... the fact is, nafta had devastating effects in mx. i saw it with my own eyes...didnt read it in a blog. americans can spin it all they like and point to events/politics in mexico at the time but if there was no demand for drugs, mexicans wouldnt be trying to supply americans. make money at all costs!! when americans do it, theyre admired. when mexicans do it, theyre the problem.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Mexico should have defaulte on the loans, rather than accept more loans: more debt. So how much do mexicans owe the foreign bankers now? Americans are in the same boat too by now. 16 trillion and counting, thank you parasite bankers and those who go along with bullshit debt slave loans.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great debate. Living through period & frequently traveling back & forth between both countries I remember that the US was impacted (for the worse) as well. Lots of US farmers were bought out by bigger agricultural firms with foreign interests. Both Bush & Salinas triggered an unstoppable action that we are still paying for. Enriched the small percent in power & further improvished the already strained majority on both sides of that surrealist reality of the Border.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The richest of the rich world capitalistas are the ones that feel the poorest, because they have a live bottomless pit of greed in their hearts.
      --without dragging the problems out by their greñas, we can not get to the solution of anything, that is where the historic truths are needed, not the fabricated to suit to size truths that some crooks prefer and pay historians to "cook" for them...

      Delete
  24. A big chunk of the US was part of mexico and it was robbed from us if all of you have forgotten

    I think you are all missing the point, there is a war on drugs and the US is to blame because the largest consumer is the US, the largest fire arm provider to the drug lords is the US, if there were no drug consumption, no market for it who would fight over the drug routes?

    I read these posts and the US people seem blinded by the US politicians, The US provides aid and helps "free" the countries where there is money to be made by the politicians, wake up, open your eyes and see that you are sending your children to get slaughtered while fighting for the greed of others not freedom, how can you be so blind and stupid, there are lots of people in the US that need help too, that are un-employed, you are not perfect

    You hate illegal immigrants but the fact is that none of you, white, black or otherwise will work on the fields and if you did a fucking tomato would cost 10 dollars, not all Mexicans are bad just like not all US people are junkies, you say that Mexicans are criminals, what about the US population? no criminals there? right

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com