Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Consensus of 75 years of combined experience in the trenches of the drug trade ; "Chapo had been thrown back into the drug world to restore order"

Borderland Beat posted by DD republished from Pro Publico
and thanks to Siskiyou Kid for finding this story and posting it on Forum
 
Over eggs at a San Antonio café, a reporter listens as former law enforcement officials and one ex-drug cartel operative swap theories about El Chapo’s latest escape and what it says about the U.S. and Mexico.
 This story was co-published with The Atlantic.
 
Mexico's Attorney General Arely Gomez shows a picture of drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman during a press conference on July 13, 2015.

 The slight man at the breakfast table seemed more like an evangelical minister than someone who once brokered deals between Mexican drug lords and state governors. He wore a meticulously pressed button-down, a gold watch, gold-rimmed glasses, and a gold cross around his neck. His dark brown hair was styled in a comb-over. And when his breakfast companions started to tuck into their bowls of oatmeal and plates of salmon benedict, he cleared his throat and asked for a moment of silence.
“Would you mind if I say grace?” he asked.

The gathering last week at Le Peep café in San Antonio would seem unusual almost anywhere except south Texas, where Mexico kind of blends into the United States — and so does the drug trade. Seated next to the cartel operative was a senior Mexican intelligence official. And next to him was a veteran American counternarcotics agent. They bowed their heads for prayer and then proceeded to talk a peculiar kind of shop.

A few days earlier, Mexico’s most powerful drug trafficker, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, had escaped again from one of that country’s maximum-security prisons. No one in this deeply sourced group was surprised. Nor were they particularly interested in the logistical details of the escape, although they clearly didn’t believe the version they’d heard from the Mexican government.



They were convinced it was all a deal cut at some link in the system’s chain. Our breakfast minister even thought that Chapo had likely walked out the front door of the jail, and that the whole tunnel-and-motorcycle story had been staged to make the feat sound so ingenious that the government couldn’t have foreseen it, much less stopped it.

Such an outlandish notion may not be surprising to anyone who knows anything about Mexico. But as someone who lived there for 10 years, and reported on the country almost twice that long, what surprised me were the men’s theories on why anyone in the Mexican government would have been interested in such a deal. Perhaps, I wondered aloud, Chapo had possessed information that could have incriminated senior Mexican officials in the drug trade and, rather than try him, they had agreed to turn a blind eye to his escape?


The heads around the table shook back and forth. Chapo, they believed, had been thrown back into the drug world to — wait for it — restore order. Things have gotten that crazy.

“When I first heard the news, I thought this is either a good thing or a bad thing,” said the cartel operative. “Either this is a sign of how far things in Mexico are out of control. Or this shows that the government is willing to risk a certain amount of international embarrassment in order to restore peace for Mexican people.”

Surely I’d been out of Mexico too long, I told the table. How could anyone believe that Chapo’s escape would be good for public security?

They pointed to what’s been happening in his absence. The levels of drug violence in Mexico have begun to surge. An ascendant cartel, known as Jalisco Nueva Generacion (the New Generation Jalisco), has launched breathtaking attacks against security forces and public officials. Led by yet another ruthless killer named Nemesio “El Mencho” Oseguera Cervantes, the cartel has set up armed roadblocks to search cars driving into and out of some of the most important cities in central Mexico, in order to keep out its rivals. And when authorities have attempted to stop the organization’s members, they’ve fought back with some serious firepower. A spectacular rocket attack earlier this year downed a military helicopter, and a rampage against Mexican police left 15 officers dead in a day.

Chapo, my breakfast companions said, was forged in the early years of the drug war. He was old-school. And for all his lunacy and willingness to do whatever it took to build his empire, he had been a kind of mitigating force — killing when he was betrayed, but staying away as much as possible from attacks against the government as long as the government allowed his business to operate. If he were allowed to get back to business, the breakfast bunch said, he’d take care of El Mencho — most likely in a spate of violence that, while painful, would be quietly treated by Mexican authorities as a necessary evil. And whichever cartel leaders remained standing would be much weakened.

“Mexico’s security apparatus is simply not ready to combat organized crime,” the intelligence official said.
There was more than 75 years of combined experience in the trenches of the drug trade at the table. As for the ins and outs of the fight against it — now in its fourth failed decade — they knew as well as anyone that no cynicism is too great. And no deal too unimaginable.

“The real problem isn’t just the flow of drugs,” said the cartel operative. “It’s the fight against drugs, because everyone gets dirty in the fight.”

While the operative, who’d been neck deep in the drug trade for more than 30 years, went to the restroom, the rest of the table talked about how he was a living case history of what’s possible. He had landed in Texas first as a fugitive, then as an outlaw. Leaders of the Zetas cartel, who pioneered the beheadings that have become a common feature of Mexico’s gory drug war, had accused him of stealing millions of dollars. They had already killed his brother and displayed his body on a busy street near the U.S. border. When the operative arrived in the United States, he was arrested by U.S. federal agents on money-laundering charges. He was released as part of a plea deal after serving two and a half years in prison, and forfeiting — the veteran agent turned to me and mumbled the figure under his breath — some $5 million.

“You know the Mercedes Sosa song that says, ‘Change, everything changes,’” the ex-con said, as he returned to the table. “I love that song. Everything changes, so why can’t I?”

The Mexican intelligence official, a barrel-bellied man with droopy jowls and short, curly, salt-and-pepper hair, said south Texas was full of men like the reformed operative. He ought to know, because he’s brought a lot of them there. While his day job keeps him incredibly busy in Mexico, he’s kept his wife, ex-wife, and children in Texas, where it’s safer and where he makes a living secretly collaborating with Washington’s drug war. The U.S. government makes it a rule not to talk about such things, but it’s an arrangement that is not uncommon for Mexicans who have worked as high-value informants. The official has helped broker deals that have allowed numerous Mexican drug traffickers or corrupt elected officials to surrender to U.S. authorities for prosecution and/or cooperation. One of his most recent negotiations, he said, had taken place in Culiacan, the capital of Chapo’s home state of Sinaloa, and involved one of the cartel leader’s sons, Alfredo. I gave him a look of disbelief. In my years of covering the drug war, I’d seen numerous classified reports that described such meetings. But Chapo’s son? Seriously?

“You’re thinking too much like an honest person,” he told me. “The United States can make deals,” the official said. “In Mexico, there is no such thing, at least not officially.”

He shrugged off the criticism from U.S. officials and the nationalistic denials from Mexican officials following Chapo’s escape as just a lot of predictable posturing. To him, the battle lines in the drug war have never been as clear-cut as politicians claim. There are instead shifting alliances in which the U.S. government, like the Mexican government, finds itself fighting against a certain bad guy one day and alongside him the next. So when U.S. officials point fingers at their Mexican counterparts as if Washington has never cut a deal with a drug trafficker, the accusations seem as hollow to people in his line of work as the Mexican government’s insistence that Chapo acted without high-level help.

“There’s no real fight against drugs,” he said. “It’s all a perverse game of interests.”

The veteran American agent, with beefy arms and a 1980s-era, Erik Estrada haircut, chimed in. “A lot of people ask me, ‘Here you have a guy killing people, torturing people, and beheading people. How can you talk to a guy like that and take information from him?’ I talked to a priest about this. He told me to look for the lesser evil. And that’s what we do. We work with the lesser evil to get the larger evil.”

He ticked down the list of violent drug traffickers whom the United States has alternately treated as friend and foe, including Vicente Zambada, son of Chapo’s right-hand man Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, who was detained by Mexican authorities in 2009 while walking into a Mexico City hotel for a meeting with two Drug Enforcement Administration agents. Zambada was extradited to Chicago, where his entire defense rests on an argument that he was working as an informant for the United States during the period covered in the indictment against him.

“I know that in order to get anything done in Mexico, I’m not going to be able to deal with altar boys,” the American agent said.

Still, a deal with Chapo strains credulity, even for those who know Mexico well. He has often been called the drug world’s equivalent of Osama bin Laden. To the chagrin of Mexico’s ruling class, he was listed by Forbes as one of the richest billionaires in the world, chief of a multinational trafficking organization known as the Sinaloa Cartel that he built after his previous escape from prison in 2001. Mexican authorities said Sinaloa was responsible for the majority of drugs flowing across the country’s border with the United States.

The Chicago Crime Commission called Chapo, “public enemy number one,” a designation that had previously been given to Al Capone. And when the cocaine business began to boom in Europe and Asia, Chapo’s business boomed with it.

Sinaloa became the McDonald’s of the drug trade. Customers could find its products — cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines — everywhere. Operations ran so smoothly that after Chapo’s arrest in February 2014, many experts predicted that they’d continue to hum along without him. However, hopes ran high in the United States and Mexico that Chapo’s arrest would herald a new era of trust between the two governments. The arrest was seen as a sign that Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto was serious about ending a long history of government corruption, and that Washington, after some skepticism, could trust him.

Chapo’s latest spectacular escape seems to have put an end to any such illusions. “I think the relationship has been set back 10 years,” the American agent observed. He said he had received calls from colleagues across the United States who seemed disgusted with Mexican officials. “If we can’t trust them to keep Chapo in jail,” he wondered, “then how can we trust them on anything?”

77 comments:

  1. A friend of mine told me that lately in coahuila chapos people have been running out the zetas which is weird because I all ways thought it was zetas home besides Tamaulipas but he said they post on Facebook and instagram "hey we know x location is run by zetas we will be there at so and so time on so and so day we are here to clean" and that they show up and kill every one he said it's getting back peaceful like it used to be not sure how true it is but I've heard chapos people show up and do what is needed to restore the peace if some sour apples get knocked off so be it I rather 10 bad guys die than 10 innocent people victimized by drugged up ass holes with ties to a certain cartel just saying.....

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    1. Maybe its true. The Zetas aren't exactly a power house anymore. Chapo tried the Gulf plaza first and failed. Then he went to the Baja Plaza and succeeded for a bit and now La Baja is being disputed again . Then he tried the Juarez Plaza and with government help he won then lost it.

      It would seem that if Chapo and Mayo are no longer on good terms and maybe he is looking for an entry into Texas instead of trying in Juarez where la linea in that one year chapo was gone absolutley ran them off.

      My guess is that Mayo is Running everything west of arizona and Chapo gets to clean up the shit he started with Chihuaha and he probably would rather attack the weakest cartel in Coahuila.
      He may be staging a choke point against Jalisco and its allies.
      If the BLO AFO Z coallition is still active he wont have a chance.

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    2. Yeees ive heard that too, it happen in Tijuas Chapos people cleaned house prior to his 2nd arrest n Tijuas was peaceful for a time. Now hes out hope he cleans TJ again. I love there Tacos!!

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    3. Even with all of Chapo's money, sicarios and political protection he was never able to fight the Zteas head to head. Chapo needed the Federales, police and military's help to even compete with the Zetas. If what you say is fact then it's amazing to me how fast a cartels balls grow when their leader is free. I doubt very seriously the Zetas and La Linea would allow this to happen no matter who is leading CDS.

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    4. Francisca ruiz massieu-salinas, niece of Carlos salinas de gortari "el chamuco" and daughter of his brother in law he got murdered is running the secretaria de turismo, spending millions and millions of dollars, and mexicans did not come back like they used to, maybe PAX CHAPO, will work better...big boys kiss and make out, others always hate...I just see...

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  2. TRUST. Yea, good luck with that children. Meanwhile REALITY waits nearby.

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  3. PRI wants things to go back to the old ways, were PRI got 10% of all the trade. 10% of everything trickled back to Mexico City and the party. Chapo has the history of working with both governments, so who do you think the governments are going to go to set things back up working the way it did in the past? First they let Rafael Caro Quintero out and I'm sure he told the government I need Chapo's help to set things back up to the old way. As they said, it's the lesser of the evils. That's who both governments want back running the show.

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    1. El PRI ya esta muy desjundillado, they are just collecting all they can for one last time.

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  4. Chapo was about to snitch on government officials so they let him out.

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    1. He dont need to.snitch everyone knows the main one is EPN.

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  5. This further confirms that the "war on drugs" is a farce, it is more of a "control of drugs" by the ruling elite. I can't blame them, like a friend once told me, hey someone's got to do it, why not me? As long as there is consumer then there will be someone to help satisfy the appetite of the consumer, whether it's drugs, t-shirts, or cheeseburgers. Business as usual.

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  6. LOL Restore order??? He started the escalation in violence and disorder a few years ago...muddledheaded

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    1. No he didn't. Zeta's were the ones that started killing innocent people

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    2. Yes he did dont blame the zetas.

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    3. Chapo started the war in Chihuahua, Tijuana and headed east to fuck with the Golfos/Zetas. Chapo was the main reason for the growth of the Zetas because of his aggression against the Golfos. But what do you know 8:37 you were probably in kindergarten when Chapo broke out of prison the first time.

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    4. The main reason was atracomulco and texas friends of politicians wanted osiel cardenas guillen's business, all of it, since before he got it, NE mexico all the way down to guerrero, was had by them priistas and salinas de gortaris, and BLO, they never knew what hit them, their friend, el PRI...and their guerrilla, los setas...

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  7. Arriba el chapo y Toda su gente, chapo is partying in LA Sierra right now fierro- atte el morroñis de la palma navolato, sinaloa.

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  8. The word "Trust" in it's self is just an illusion naïve people wish to believe in.
    Trust: confident expectation of something; hope. (Status Quo till something better comes along)

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  9. Bullshit. plain and simple. Chapo is the one that starts the drug wars. The only places I can think it would benefit is sonora and maibe chihuahua because cds is fighting each other ever since he got locked up, he's going to bring them back together. Other than that, Mexico is still fudged. This bullshit propaganda about chapo being a hero is a prime example. Fuck this shot peace of caca!

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  10. we all know that drugs are a necessary evil.....the culture here in america is the engine that feds other countries to supply it..we blame and talk shit about mexico, but the longest we keep on being hypocrites when it comes to drugs , it would continue to be an issue...legalization is a way to start...and making law changes a bit more aggressive for corruption...otherwise there will be borderbeats for the next 10000 years ...a never ending story..

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  11. Mexicos drug war hangs on both countries operating a give and take scenario in which United States needs people to imprison and Mexico needs funding for weapons in order for weapon manufacturers to operate in profit margins. Stop the drugs, and you'll stop a secret economic growth by big corporations

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  12. Just trust in chapo hes the only one that has his shit straight...american govt needs to kump aboard and start investing in the federation......sometime in the future it will overcome and society wont be so hell bent on enforcing morals....arriva la sierra pariente puro Sinaloa hasta Denver Colorado parienton!

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    1. Awevo compa. Yes i think chapo could run mexico better than ayone else. I believe he has the intelect and balls to do it well but maybe not the educational credentials....plus he is a convicted criminal. But if we could bypass all that shit i say fuck it and just let him take over

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  13. thats what the goverment wants to only have el mayo and chapo control most of mexico cause they just work selling drugs they dont kill inocent people, or any low things i think caro quitero,mayo,and chapo aint going to be bother for a long time the one gettng all the is going to be mencho

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  14. ... Over eggs at a San Antonio café, a reporter listens as former law enforcement officials and one ex-drug cartel operative swap theories about El Chapo’s latest escape and what it says about the U.S. and Mexico ... Another Garbage Story Like "BDN", 2 In 1 Week ... WTF?

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    1. What can you say, a bunch of snitches getting together to shoot the breeze on how to make money of the mexican side and the american side. Thats how they make their money. Snitches for hire
      .

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    2. lololol...DD rekt this dude. hahahahahaha

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    3. DD fuck em 90% of drug war information is speculation look at stratfor they make careers out of it, at least you're not putting blatant bs on about z42 crashing his lambo into lazca on a zebra to get hits

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    4. I was in the NY times a while ago, they still saying the mayor and his wife did the 43 ayotzinapos in with help of the police and the guy gang, nothing about the children murdered at Semei Verdia's arrest...
      --i am impressed with the many prizes and awards, also with the purchase of part of the NY times by carlos slim helu, the billionaire drug trafficker, even more that the Laredo times or sompim, newspaper was not allowed to be sold to the hank rohn for they were suspected drug trafficking outlaws who also had to give away their Laredo national bank...
      --Maybe the big laws do not apply to the megalithic megalomaniac with munchos pesos y munchos tortibonos...
      --some young hoes always hang with the older painted ones to steal their best customers and deserve the Stanley Cup of journalism...
      --i hope one of these guys at the meet know how comandante Guillermo Gonzalez Calderoni got whacked in texas...

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    5. I hope they know why CHUY QUINTANILLA GOT WHACKED IN TEXAS, and who did it.

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  15. Just one problem with the thesis: more than 60,000 were killed and at least that many more disappeared before Chapo was jailed. And now he's going to restore order?

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  16. u r right Chapo has more power than Pena Nieto. Salinas and Slim got rich off tis guy, thats how they made $$$$$$$$$$$$$ billions off the drug trade, Than these dunbasses Zetas started cutting off heads and ruined Mexico. That's not the way to do business. Sell the Drugs and leave the innocent Mexican alone. The Good people just want to rise their families and work in peace

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    1. The los setas were soldiers, gafes, trained by school of the americas and their kaibiles, like the Atlacatl batallion, murderers of their own people, that is why they never went anywhere but down, holding the hand of judas, reincarnated in z40...
      --Starting with the fall of their boss, z1 arturo guzman decena, mysteriously left alone where he could get whacked...

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  17. Lets just face it, Chapos escape was n will be better than "The Great Escape" from Alcatraz. Lets rank this up there with the 7th wonder of the world.

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  18. Geez. Don't these expert people at the table know that the Mexican Government, including the political parties, are the Cartel that control all Cartels?
    Put them all together and this is the organized crime in Mexico.
    Sort of like in the U.S.

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    1. Global Vulture Capitalistas are the cartel that matters, the US even do their dirty job for them, collecting and helping launder "their money", mexican cartels do not even take 10% of the money...the middlemen in mexico always make the bigger cut, farmers get it up the ass all the time...

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  19. This site is lame and boring now!

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    1. 7:23 ...Y PORQUE NO TE VAS A LA VERGA???
      YOUR LAME MAMADAS ARE BORING, with a passion...

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  20. Chapo bringing order to the drug trade? That's shockingly naive for these highly credentialed folks....it clearly has to do w either his simple financial might or more likely his info on top politicians and empresas on both sides of the border...how the hell does he magically bring order? I do believe we favored him back in the day when it was clear Los zetas needed to be eliminated but now? How is a Juarez like war w CDJNG helping to bring order? That's idiotic.....US policy of backing 'the lesser of two evils' has created such successes as saddam and bin laden both our boys to start....this strategy has proven time and time again to have unintended consequences....order the drug war? Ok.,..when you are done 'order' all the sand on the beach....

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    1. Good point. In fact it will just get more violent and he still wont dominate.

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  21. Pretty lame. Just three unidentified guys shooting the shit over breakfast.

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  22. Pobre chapo, le pelaron hasta el toupee postizo, pero se la pagaron con mas pintura pa' las canas
    The best part is they had all the prisoners on the yard for a cycle count, there was miguel angel felix gallardo and don neto fonseca carrillo looking like zombies in the sun, all pasty white...

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  23. “There’s no real fight against drugs,” he said. “It’s all a perverse game of interests.”

    La mera, mera verdad.

    Lo más increible, es que los gobiernos piensan que la gente, el público cree las historias [aka, pendejadas] que nos cuentan. Idiotas. Con gente cómo Anabel Hernandez, ya nos habia dado cuenta de la verdad desde hace muchos años. Mamones politicos.

    Felicidades desde Acapulco,
    AmigoAnónimo

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  24. Great story!

    Sure is food for thought, since it is so hard to know for certain the real truth about so much of this...

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  25. Thank you DD/BB! Who am I to question the best minds? To be sure, Mexico is privately outraged at the recent turn of events. They would surely be willing to employ unconventional mercenaries like Chapo. However, at the end of the long haul. Perhaps, for the short term Chapo will bring 'sanity' although his presence did not bring very much 'sanity' in prior years.

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  26. BB has merged with BDN.
    or at least this reporter has

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  27. Real interesting read. I agree with the part about chapo' escape. I think the whole thing was played out. I don't even believe the guy in the video was el chapo. As a matter of fact I don't even believe the guy they captured in 2014 was el chapo either. He just looks like a phony lol

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  28. the gobers were knocking the shit out of the cartels in the last few years....Chapo's opportunity/moment in time to restore order passed when Z-40 was arrested.

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    1. The "gobernadores" are just recovering drug trafficking for el pri, and putting it all under one umbrella, the Las Lomas Cartel from Atracomulco, Estado de Mexico

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  29. Very interesting article. Thank you BB/DD.However, I don't think this dog will hunt. I put this in the category of we would rather have him inside the tent pissing out; rather outside the tent pissing in. I nominate Chapo as merc butt munch of the year. Clearly, Mexico is furious and embarrassed by the CJNG fiasco, but the birth of this tunnel predates the more recent losses by the military.

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  30. El chapo snitched...... On the Mexican and US govt! Hahahaha

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  31. Is it me or is that pic she is holding up not.the same person that got into the helicopter

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  32. Some of you people can't see what the problem is. Yes, there has been a crazy amount of violence in Mexico with Chapo out of prison but it has gotten worse since he was in prison. Some people say that CJNG is his group but I don't believe it. Could be his doing in making the Govt think they really needed him out there to get the CJNG under control because they are taking out police helicopters with rocket launchers and shutting down whole cities, MAJOR cities. That would be a good move on his part but it is a long shot.
    The problem with all of this is that it started once the Govt of Felipe Calderon decided to start the war on drugs down there in the beginning of this century. Once that began, they disrupted to "deal" between the Govt and the Cartels that had been in place for decades. 2 things happened there:
    1. The Cartel leaders started getting taken out. That causes a vacuum in the power structure at the top, which brings on splinter groups, who have to battle the other side of the old cartel for the power and smuggling routes. This is where most of the killing comes from. All of these splinter groups, who used to be one big, happy cartel at the top, are now fighting amongst each other with billions of dollars on the line. They one-up each other in violence to try and get the other side to bend to their will and be afraid to fight.The splinter groups all over the place is the biggest issue Mexico is facing, dozens of splinter groups all trying to outdo the other in violence and trying to get the better Plazas and routes. There used to be about 7 cartels, now there are too many to count.
    2. Cartel leaders started getting paranoid because they thought that the Govt was going to back their rival. This caused a lot of groups to go to war with other cartels to take as much power away from them as possible to get the Govt to back them instead.
    My point here is that yes, there has been tons of violence but the cartels aren't going anywhere and I really don't know why on earth the Govt decided to try and do something about them. They will always be there and they need to get back to the old days of things staying quiet. While Chapo was in prison, things got worse and hopefully, they understand that they will NEVER get rid of the cartels and the economy would most likely collapse without them there. They need to just get some sort of truce worked out behind the scenes to get this all calmed down because it is getting crazy out there. They need a huge figure like El Chapo to get everyone together and work out a deal, like Luciano and Lansky making the Commission with the Mafia

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  33. this is the second time I have heard that
    el Chapo walked out of the front gate, the first time was in Mexico, got the money got the power

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  34. Idiotic theory.

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    1. I agree. It's nothing but pure greed at work.

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  35. Jajaja chapo vs CJNG sigan soñando chapo trabajo para el cartel de Guadalajara en Los tiempos de Rafael y Miguel gracias a ellos se formo el cartel de Sinaloa Jalisco tiene mas tiempo en el negicio de las drogas y su plaza siempre fue y sera respetada. Hay sapos y hay capos para que se den una idea estudien la historia del narco trafico en Colombia antes y despues de la muerte del señor Pablo Escobar. Oh simplemrnte miren el cartel de Los sapos la cual describe como trabajan los gobiernos de la mano con los capos y los sapos.

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    1. Qir mal estas informate pero no de noyicias o de novelitas que sacan. Empeso en la sierrra de badiraguato desde antes que se fueran a guadalajara, muchisismo antes. Con tanta competencia prefirieron irse a guadalajara la mayoria de los sinaloenses vivieron aya.. Desde los tiempos d pedro aviles.. Aun no volaban alto los mencionados arriba

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    2. Jajaja nunca dije que los capos eran de Jalisco meco simple mente que el chapo y el mayo eran unos gatos mas como tu comprenderas de Los patrones y quien repartio los territoriosfue el señoron Miguel a los arellanos y a los sapos ... Los viejonres como el mencho no trabajan para los gringos y mucho menos son dedos como las sinalokas

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    3. Cjng era parte de el cartel de Sinaloa pendejo y el mencho traiciono a el chapo en colima ya esta el cartel de sinaloa asiendo la limpia Jalisco era un lugar seguro cuando el cds era dueno de la plaza y a hora con el mencho us nadie va a jalisco

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  36. So did anyone else catch that Alfredo chapos son is a US informant??

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    1. Like father like son. That's why nothing will ever happen to him or the Zambada Boyz. It's a necessary trait for the Cartel De Snitches and the legacy will continue thru the next generation.

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    2. Keep on hating as the "snitches" as u call them, get richer!!!! Haters!!!!

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    3. no I think it will all crash down eventually. the ochoas lasted a while to and they had polititions in their pockets.

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    4. Well this time it's different they have the presidents in their pockets and they choose who's gunna be president

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    5. The Ochoa never lost their narco-politico power as a family. El Viejo ascoroso got Alvarito Uribe all his jobs, from the airport gig, to mayor to paramilitary founder to governor to president and, now, senator. The Ochoa, like Rodriguez Gacha & the Uribe never quit being General Gustavo Rojas Penilla fans like a lot of Colombia's other right-wingers.

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    6. @2:31 So all the fighting drugs all over colombia was/is a farce?
      The chicago crime commission was only formed be a use the Irishers could not fight Al Capone anymore, so they parsimoniously joined together to fight the crime that made them very rich also but they could not monopolize until they joined forces with aspiring politicians and police in chicago...

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  37. I have a short reply to the comment lauding the reporter and ProPublica. Every journalist and news organization can get spun or inaccurately report a story. Evidence? The Washington Post's Pulitzer Prize winning series, "Jimmy's World." The NYT lapdog coverage of Bush in the run-up to the Iraq War. Ah, and then there was the story of how Osama Bin Laden was taken out and buried at sea.
    My take is that the story flies in the face of all kinds of evidence and just plain common sense. Some sort of deal was cut, for sure, but what's described in the story was not it. We may never know.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, shit happens, but grow up and get over it, don't cut your wrist again over it, that would be a total fiasco...

      Delete
    2. and what evidence do you have that bin laden WASNT TAKEN OUT AND BURIED AT SEA?

      please do tell omniscient one....

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    3. Are yu talkin' to me?

      Delete
  38. Who runs el salto jalisco

    ReplyDelete
  39. How is mencho the bad guu for attacking the government wen the government is the one fucking every thing up

    ReplyDelete
  40. I thought Quintero ran Guanatos y sus alrrededores!

    ReplyDelete
  41. Yo! Chapo's job description includes drug wars. Thanks BB for this, it is one of the few intelligent articles out there on the role Chapo's empire plays for Washington DC's twisted goals for Mexico.

    ReplyDelete

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