Thursday, October 23, 2014

From Michoacán to Guerrero, the Narco State


Veracruz: Students from the University of Veracruz join the protest for the Ayotzinapa case


By: José Gil Olmos | Translated by Valor for Borderland Beat

The Narco State is one of the most recent meanings to define the structure where organized crime has become the government and the politicians, governors, and drug traffickers are all the same.  It isn’t about the infiltration or the corruption, but of the symbiosis of these last two figures in which all of the power is concentrated and they function to control a territory with the laws of violence and terror.

This is what has happened more clearly in Michoacán and Guerrero than in other states in the last decade, under the apathy of governors and political parties who don’t care about the conditions of violence and the safety of the population that suffers havoc caused by an unconventional war, but only care about staying in power at all costs.

 For decades, we have witnessed the merger or symbiosis between politicians and drug traffickers with the cases of former governors of Quintana Roo, Mario Villanueva Madrid; Tamaulipas, Tomás Yarrington; Morelos, Sergio Estrada Cajigal, and long before with Enrique Álvarez del Castillo in  Jalisco or Víctor Manuel Tinoco in Michoacán.

Also with generals Jesús Gutiérrez Rebollo, Ricardo Escorcia, Cuauhtémoc Antúnez Pérez, head of the 7th Military Region in Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas; Juan Manuel Rico Gámez, Commander of the 35th Military Zone based in Chilpancingo, Guerrero; Roberto Aguilera, retired Major General and head of the Narcotics Intelligence Center (CIAN) during the administration of Vicente Fox; Luis Rodríguez Bucio, head of CIAN during the early presidency of Felipe Calderón and former commander of the 64th Military Garrison in Cancún, Quintana Roo, and Brigadier General Moisés García Ochoa, former director of the Secretariat of National Defense (SEDENA).

No legislators and mayors escape such as the PRD representative Julio César Godoy Toscano, who is currently a fugitive; the mayor of Ixtapan de la Sal, Ignacio Ávila Navarrete; the PRI mayor of Apatzingán Uriel Chávez Mendoza; Aldo Macías Alejandres (PRI-PVEM), the Major of Uruapan;
Gildardo Barrera (PRI), the major of Churumuco; Arquímides Oseguera (PRD), of Lázaro Cárdenas; Martín Arredondo (PAN), of Jacona; Jesús Infante (PAN), of Ecuandureo; Juan Hernández (PRI), of Aquila; Jesús Rivera (PRI), of Tumbiscatío; Rosa Hilda Abascal (PAN), of Zamora, and Elías Álvarez Hernández, former Secretary of Public Security of the state of Michoacán.

The list goes on, and it’s long.  The Narco State was forming for years in an environment of corruption, impunity and injustice; cultivated by governors of all parties to the levels we have today with its terrible consequences such as the 2010 San Fernando Massacre; the executions in Tlatlaya; or the recent disappearances of the normalistas of Ayotzinapa.

In the Narco State, the new group in power, the narco-politicians, control territory to establish their own empire of taxation, extortions, and kidnappings; its own economy with laws of the global market, with partners from other groups in other countries who not only sell drugs, but other agricultural products such as precious metals, minerals, and hydrocarbons.  Its own law.

That’s what we clearly see in Michoacán and Guerrero, the formation of the Narco State, where the two governors, Ángel Aguirre Rivero and Fausto Vallejo (former governor), have been accused of receiving money for their campaigns by organized crime and then allowing criminal gangs to rule and control the territory above everyone, and with the collusion of all other authorities.

Source: Proceso

7 comments:

  1. I just read on the forum about osorio chong proposing that the "los rojos gang that extort piso from los guerreros unidos were the ones who kidnapped the students", that on top of pena nieto saying the problems in guerrero "are local", and el pri protecting the priista mayor abarca and priista governor rivero posing as prd to give the prd party a bad name...
    --Just how many more fairy tales are we supposed to believe?
    --Michoacan Autodefensas ARE local, why did el pendejo nazional send otro pendejo there to mess up something that was under control?

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  2. Bunch of bullshit. Every state in mexico is a narco state not just michoacan or guerrero.!!

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  3. Shining a light on what most Mexicans already know, the USA is too gullible at this point in time to realize the same. Banks and special interests have perfected the layering of people and business to know who the real players are.

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  4. the drug industry is 94 yrs old in mexico, with well established contacts over the whole political spectrum, So it will be interesting to see if that way of life can be changed, the normal approach is to provide some kind of alternative income such as establishing of factory's or other types of employment. people need to live give the chance

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  5. Blame it on the sinaloans there the ones who came up with narcopolitica there the ones who brang the plague they turned everyone else into narco states. Try and mess with sinaloa politicians and see where you end up there a plague Im telling you there worser than the cartels and they Will forever live in that society along with other narco states and narco politicos it will never end.

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    Replies
    1. Por que a sinaloa..tal ves si hay algo de rason pero asi no se opera en sinaloa.. Quien recuerda cuando levantaron a 50 trabajadores del empaque creo era el gato de lara que era propiedad de los carrillos casi junto cuando quemaron a cruz carrillo... Se levanto a 50 trabajadores de campo. Normalmente prosedentes del sur del pais .. Cuando se dieron cuenta que eran solo eso los liberaron..

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  6. Drug traffickng and drug addiction was more or less manageable on the US, and on mexico, until the heroin trafficked on air america from south-east asia was changed for cocaine from south america, thanks to henry kissinger klaus barbie, oliver north, felix ismael rodriguez, juan ramon matta ballesteros, the CIA, and george hw bush among many others...
    --all the mexican narcos and sicarios, are not as bad as one mexican politician.

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