Sunday, August 18, 2013

"We Are Villagers In Search of Justice"


By: Záyin Dáleth Villavicencio

(August 8 2013).- Aquila, Michoacán.- “For a free Michoacán, that should be our goal”, claimed members of the self defense group of Aquila,  informing the next regionalization of armed civil movements, the self-styled community police.



The armed uprising in Michoacán against the Knights Templar cartel emerged simultaneously in the municipalities of Buenavista Tomatlán and Tepalcatepec since last February 24.  Then followed by: Coalcomán, Aguililla, Aquila, Chinicuila and  Coahuayana.



For the past couple of years, the seven municipalities that belong to the regions of Tierra Caliente and Costa, suffered harassment from organized crime charging of: quotas or to pay one’s dues, kidnappings and other abuses.



They charged fees to all 401 community members; $2,000 each, they kidnapped a boy and the families weren’t able to do anything because they would make them disappear.



Now “the goal is a broader self-defense movement,” said one of the five community commanders just before an inter-meeting was held between members of the self-defense groups of Aquila with representatives from Coalcomán and Chinicuila.



“We are communicating with the community guards of Chinicuila, Tepalcatepec and Coalcomán, we are trying to make this bigger because if we unite, it will be all over the state of Michoacán,” he anticipated.


 On What Side Is The Mayor On?

Meanwhile, residents from the municipality of Aquila demanded that the mayor of the municipal, Juan Hernández Ramírez, to return to his activities since he hasn’t been to the municipality since last June, after the emergence of the movement “Por un Aquila Libre”.



“We are waiting for him to come and to tell us what side he’s on, on the people’s side or the criminals,” informed the members of the Community Police to the mayor, who they say is threatened by organized crime and pays two different criminal organizations a quota for the plaza.


Located in the Sierra-Costa region of Michoacán, the municipality of Aquila has been under guard for about two weeks.  Groups of villagers with large caliber weapons, covered faces, and dressed in white shirts; look after each entrance, by highway and in the highlands.



 A representation of more than 30 community police officers, gathered in front of an audience of the indigenous community of San Miguel de Aquila, said in an interview for REVOLUCIÓN TRES PUNTO CERO (Revolution 3.0) that the conformation of the self-defense group came after the community had been required to provide a monthly quota of $700,000 to organized crime for over the past two years.



“We organized ourselves because we want there to be freedom and justice that we haven’t been given.  They’ve been robbing us for a long time, but we decided to arm ourselves because no one would help us and we don’t know what happened to the government,” said the leader of the community.


 On the past July 24th, about a hundred villagers took the command in San Miguel de Aquila, but not before apprehending the municipal police, whom they accuse of direct links to organized crime.


“We knew that the police were in collusion with organized crime.  Some days we would see them dressed up as police and other days as hitmen.  And even though the City Hall was never taken over, the mayor left,” said one of the communal authorities.


However, since June, the movement began taking shape and took control of the county seat, in accordance with the community assembly, as is still done through customs and traditions in San Miguel de Aquila.



After noting that for a month, the mayor hadn’t dispatched at the City Hall, they warned: “We are waiting for the mayor, to come because his municipal president is free.  We didn’t run him out but we believe that he was being threatened”.



We Are Villagers Seeking Justice

Meeting in the hearing of the population, a hundred people accompanied by women and children, claimed that the white shirt with the words “Por un Aquila Libre” (For a Free Aquila), worn by the men of the community, is a credential “because we are not just a group of masked men, but community members who seek justice”.


More than a month after the formation of the self-defense group, the achievements for the community are: not paying anymore quotas to organized crime “and that families feel safe”.  Because we pay about $2,000 per villager and since we organized there is no more kidnapping and no more quotas.
 

One of the Community Police leaders said, “It began here in the community of Aquila, with 10 men who were trusted people, but today we are about 250 armed men determined to defend the community.”  “However, the goal is a broader self-defense movement that also includes communities in the municipal,” said one of the five commanders of Aquila.

The Feds “Got Tired and Left”

In this context, they said, the federal government was the only one to answer their call, by sending in 150 elements of the Federal Police (PF) to support the safety of the population, but after a while “they got tired and left”

They sent a message to the state government: “We invite [the governor Jesus Reyna] to support the movement of Aquila, we are waiting.  We are a poor family and we know how to respect, so come talk to us.  To the Federal Government [we give them] thanks because they support us now.  To the other communities who are now organizing [we say] that we are prepared to support them.
To the society, we want to tell them that we are people, that we are communities and not part of organized crime.  We want to let them know that we are not 10 or 30 people, we are the entire community and its people who support us, because here we all seek justice and to live in peace.”


They also warned that the rise of armed civilian groups is not because of a division between communities, much less the influence with the mining company Ternium, but a movement for safety and against organized crime.


In the municipal seat life goes by peacefully, the shops are open and the people say it’s peaceful.  However they say that a few months ago, few people began going out because organized crime had taken over the municipal: “They were the law, they told the people what to do and even scolded them.  Everyone was afraid.”


Today, armed men walk by the town normally, some with sandals, bandanas or open faced, all in uniform consisting of a white shirt that says “Por un Aquila Libre”.


“Now they are the law, but we are not afraid of them because they are our brothers, our fathers, our husbands.  They take care of the people because that is what we want, a self-governed government like how the people of Cherán managed to achieve, because we are indigenous”  said one of the women of the community from a taco stand where she serves in the town square.

Source: Revolución 3.0


45 comments:

  1. I'm under the impression that the self defense group in Aquila is concerned with regaining control of mining concession paid to villagers by a foreign mining company.

    Agustín Villanueva Ramírez, the leader of the Aquila self defense group is the local chieftain, or Cacique, who was in charge of the "gifts" paid by an Argentinian mining company, Ternium, to local leaders. Previously, Villanueva received the entire payment and doled it out, but a new deal paid the "tax" through various community leaders.

    I don't know the details, but apparently a small number of villagers [401 individuals] receive a bank card for as much as 33,000 pesos [$2,500 USD] every month.

    Please correct me if I'm confused, but it is being reported that Villanueva's "self defense group" is in reality a group trying to regain control of the distribution of the "gifts" paid by the mining company Ternium for mining community land.

    http://www.cbtelevision.com.mx/noticia/regalias-de-mina-principal-problema-en-aquila?o=index

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    1. Mexico has been pilaged since Cortez & the Spainiards set foot in Mexico..why honor a foreign company? It sits on their land..it was probably a crooked politician who sold out the mining rights!!!! Fuck Ternium Mining Corp.!!!!

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  2. Awesome pics!!! Wow I was in the marines for five years and I can tell you those weapons they have are not cheap. And u expect us to believe that these poor villagers just got them from farming!?!!!? I know now that the cjnj cartel is helping them. Will it never end Mexico ? I guess the honest ones who wouldn't take the bribe are dead and buried long ago. Only the shit remains

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    1. Haha yup majority of labororers get 1000 pesos a week.. How the fuck would they be able to charge them 2000.?? Those foos are starting to sound like la tuta

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    2. It was mentioned the cjng cartel is really Mexican marines & army disguised as sicarios.they fight a black ops war first with Zetas in Veracruz now in Michoacan against Caballeros Templarios.It's they only way they'll up-root CT..classic winning of hearts & minds..

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  3. The fucking state goverment sent into akila 600 men to desolve the conmunity policy and arrest 46 people and the leaders of the community police and now los caballeros templarios took control back of the town again i expect a masacre and the fucking state governnor is trying to do the same in the other towns that are fighting los caballeros templarios im ashamed of being mexican what a piece of shit country

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  4. An AR-15 or Ak are about 4 to 5 grand in Southern Mex. Over a years pay for the average Mexican. Im from Michoacan and I will tell you dont be fooled by the smoke and mirrors. Theres more than meets the eye. There are foreign interest involved.

    el pingudo

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  5. if villagers get $2,500 a month they can easily afford those weapons, in pesos maybe just the shotguns.

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    Replies
    1. Yea but they didn't buy them from a store. They smuggled them in. Those are illegal as fuck and they bought them from those cjnj fucks

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    2. They should have bought them from CT hahaha, mamon

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  6. Michoacan controla todo mexico

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  7. Hey, Siskiyou_Kid,

    Yeah, Insight is reporting the same thing:

    http://www.insightcrime.org/news-briefs/self-defense-force-leader-arrested-for-claiming-mining-royalties

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  8. People u @ times have 2 have faith & give credit 2 those willing. 2 make a difference n such horrible, difficult conditions. There's enough turmoil & corruption n mexico that I can see how towns, communities, would tire of the mess, corruption, cruelty etc...& take.arms against all this evilness. It's not an easy task & I congratulate all the brave men, women willing 2 risk their life's. No ones perfect - some may have a past, does that mean they can't get together & decide"Enough is Enough "???? It has 2 start somewhere, somehow - instead of critiquing b supportive. Walk n there shoes & see how long it would take u 2 make a difference & get involved.

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    1. @4:14 p.m i dont have any problem with them defending themselves more power to them as they need too.i cant imagine living like that but i do wonder about the weapons.i know in the u.s the ATF make u jump through hoops want a pint of blood and your firstborn child to be able to get a clearance for weapons like that.you can own them but u get put through alot.in mexico the citizens cant legally own those types of weapons so just curious where they came from

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  9. Michoacan controla todo

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    Replies
    1. Hahaha No digas pendejadas

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  10. Long live the People's Community Police & death to that bastard coward Puta and his parasite CT thugs.

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  11. Damn I thought they got their weapons from cartel stash houses...or so ive read but those are only words only, easily manipulated

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  12. If these people form a group like los pepes im sure the US will help them out

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  13. That is the spirit of the 2nd amendment. The ability to protect the physical integrity of one's family and property; with lethal force if deterrence is not enough. The people of Aquila and the other communities of Michoacan are defending themselves against organized criminals and government criminality - and they are succeeding. This could be the start of a peaceful revolution that can bring change to Mexico.

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  14. Self Defense front, No way can they afford
    auto-machine guns, without selling drugs.
    Just 1 more small time cartel, trying to make it to the big leagues.

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    Replies
    1. Thats Good as Long as they don't extort and they beat Fuck the CT

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  15. YESSSSSSSSS!!!! more uprisings please we need the people to fight back!

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  16. ,$2500 PESOS is about $200 USD.@ 12.5:1 exchange rate. Meaning saving an awful long time to be able to purchase any weapon.

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  17. you guys are funny about the weapons, in any revolution or uprising, they worked for their weapons? Cartel, think not....use some imagination, think outside the box of ammo, and see the big picture.

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  18. who really cares how they got the weapons the fact is they have them. Bet the chickenshit cartels won't be so quick to harass and extort the people now.

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    Replies
    1. Totally agree with you

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  19. All it takes is two or three rich ranchers, who are sick of getting extorted, to fork over the money to buy 50 machine guns. What would that cost? 100,000 USD. That's 30,000 USD per rancher if there are 3. There are people in these towns with that kind of money.

    Also, the 2000 pesos a month cuotas are an average, 700,000 pesos per month divided by the number of people. While it strikes me as high, I'm sure some of the richer citizens who were involved in avocado farming, marijuana, or large scale cattle are probably paying 50,000 per month each. The rest comes in smaller quantities like 500 or 750 pesos per person but it adds up.

    I miss visiting Aquila. Last time I was there in 2009 I saw a brand new red viper there, just cruising on a dirt road. Their is money there, lots of independent drug growers or at least there was.

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  20. @4:14 fkn damn right brother!!! damn keyboard warriors ata lady hens night..

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  21. To believe that these "villagers" are fighting for freedom is like believing the US invaded Iraq in the name of freedom: PURA PINCHE GRINGO BOLA DE KAKA!
    The brainwashed foot soldier may initially believe it, but after a while on the ground all but the most stupid/brainwashed uderstand that it is about money. Iraq or Mexico or any other armed conflict: war and conflict is about making millionaires!!!

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  22. To all those loud mouth bitches. Other communities and people in the us send money to support the towns im from cheran and thousands of us sent in a couple hundred thousand dollars ..now shits think twice before doing their shit in town..and all those that really are interested of helping out these poor people u can but shut the fuck up if u see pics of these guys with millutary weapends ..got to do what we got to do

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    1. Been saying that mexican citizens need to arm themselves and take back whats rightfully theirs and dont let the narcos rob them blind.we would do the same thing if it was here in the u.s the way it is there and we are already well armed as a nation.

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  23. I am an American living in Mexico. There are families that have money stashed away. I know of a man that has three mansions here in Chihuahua. He is a famous mining engineer, director of a University and graduated from Harvard. DO not doubt that there are a lot of wealthy people that would be willing to contribute to this cause. Maybe not, but I want to believe that is what is happening. I am sure some of those guns could have come from military, and others from confiscations by military and police. I have seen pictures of confiscations of weapons that could easily supply a pueblo like this. I will stay positive and not want to think that all Mexicans are on the take. There are a lot of good people here. Many in small communities like this one.

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  24. Some weapons may simply have been taken from the bad guys.

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  25. Goes out to any "good" guys & gals in the trenches & bunkers with no one to cry for help to. (Oh, to all you experts. Old outdated 12ga.
    duck guns are not very high tech hardware.
    If there are any good guys and gals left in Mexico this goes out to them.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MO0lUXnAs-U

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  26. I'm wondering why so many don't know this news makes it all around the world despite the shitty reporting of it in the US. With that said, many are sending money to relatives in the area from abroad. Some may even be smuggling weapons into the area from the border States. It wouldn't even surprise me if Mxn Marines were "losing" a crate or two of weapons & ammo near these towns for the good people to find.

    Oh, and no to the person who keeps mentioning Los Pepes. They were horrible and killed, kidnapped, & extorted more innocent people than the Cartels. That is why the US abruptly stopped their funding ... COINTEL was a disaster. They were pretty Colombia's version of the Z's.

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  27. Pro Kocho putos

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  28. how does one make a small political contribution to these freedom fighters?

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  29. I want a t-shirt that says "libre de aquilla". Como compra?

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    Replies
    1. Go to the swap meet and have it made

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  30. Looks like another story to this story.

    http://www.lapoliciaca.com/nota-roja/dos-miembros-de-grupo-de-autodefensa-mueren-en-un-enfrentamiento-en-michoacan/

    http://www.lapoliciaca.com/nota-roja/comando-armado-incendia-autobus-de-autodefensa-en-michoacan/

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  31. Where is that CT scumbag parasite bastard who comments under the name "Knowledge" ? Looks like these CT rats are running away like pussy cowards.

    Long Live the Community Police.

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  32. @ Aug. 18, 1:45 PM Your comment, "I'm ashamed of being Mexican. What a piece of shit country.": I think what you're really saying is you're ashamed of what's happening there, but it doesn't represent you, you're have nothing to be ashamed about. And it's not really a piece of shit country either. Like most others, it's a lovely country with great people but controlled by pieces of shit. I lived there only about a year. I don't speak Spanish... Heh heh...ja ja...but never had a problem getting what I needed or getting credit at the little store on the corner when I was short of pesos. Got invitations to non-English-speaking casas, sat on the beach while dogs went for a swim at night and fishermen slapped the water and pulled nets. Got to know how the other little guys like myself struggled to live every day and deal with that hell-on-earth run by demons over there. Yeah we had the Federales and military, you didn't go out of the house if you didn't have to. There are some differences, but basically we're in the Third World War right now. It's the war between the people and the Controllers, whether the controllers are government or cartels, whether Egypt, Africa, US, Mexico. . The beauty of life is only hidden, my friend. Only hidden, not gone. I don't know what will turn it around, except the power of God. Apologies for psychoanalyzing you. Just want to say...what I said.

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