Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Narcos complain about U.S. jail accommodations

El Diario 9-25-2012 by Victor Hugo Michel


 Osiel Cardenas Guillen
Translated by un vato for Borderland Beat

Distrito Federal. (Milenio).-- The stories are based on the lives of four men in prison; one says he has repented after controlling a criminal empire. Remorseful, he asks the people of Mexico and the United States to forgive him for his actions. Another one has fallen into a deep depression and his lawyers fear for his mental stability. He is in permanent isolation. One other asks to be allowed to have human contact because the loneliness of his cell terrifies him. The fourth one asks that his shackles be loosened because they have begun to hurt him.

They are jailhouse stories. Prison routines common to jails all over the world. But their protagonists are not ordinary. Far from it, they are-- or were-- some of the most powerful men in Mexico. Its principal drug kingpins. How do the highest ranked narcos live their prison sentences in the United States? How does Washington treat them? Not very well.

Federal District (Distrito Federal)-- "My client needs glasses but they won't provide them to him"..."it's undignified for him to be kept in shackles"..."he just wants to see his wife and daughter." These are some of the complaints presented during the last five years by the lawyers for the great captains of drug trafficking. Life is not simple for them. After their falls, celebrities of the magnitude of Francisco Javier Arellano Felix, Osiel Cardenas Guillen, Miguel Caro Quintero and Vicente Zambada were subjected to an iron fist regimen.

Documents obtained by Milenio reveal the hermetical nature of that country's prison world and the way the narcos are dealing with their imprisonment. It's a harsh panorama, a world of austere cells, limited rights and no privileges, much different than what they enjoy in Mexico. Their requests show a more vulnerable side, rarely seen in criminals who tend to be closer to myth than to reality.
 
Francisco Arellano Felix

Francisco Arellano Felix; chained to 'prejudice'

"El Tigrillo" was apprehended in August, 2006, by the U.S. Coast Guard on board a yacht in an operation whose legality was questioned up to the day he was sentenced to life in prison a year later. Defense counsel for the heir to the Arellano Felix Cartel argued fruitlessly that his capture took place on Mexican waters, and was therefore illegal. The United States government maintained, successfully, that he was in international waters, beyond the 15 mile limit that was required.

The youngest of the Arellano Felix brothers went to trial in the (Federal District) Court for the Southern District of California, which sits in San Diego. His case, No. 06CR2646-01-LAB, was assigned to Federal (District Court) Judge Larry Burns. Throughout the proceedings, the defense for the Mexican citizen petitioned repeatedly to improve the conditions of his imprisonment.

On January 16, 2007, lawyers for Arellano Felix began with their demands: they filed a special motion "to remove all physical restraints during the trial," due to the presumed physical and mental damage that keeping their client shackled hand and foot, even in the court room, was causing him. The Mexican's defense (team), made up of lawyers David Bartick and Mark Adams, even invoked the 5th and 6th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution to argue that Arellano Felix's civil rights were being violated. The initial petition was as follows:
   
     "Our Defendant, Mr. Francisco Javier Arellano Felix, has been subjected to an exceptional and unjustified physical restraint during each preliminary hearing prior to trial in this case. In each hearing, Mr. Arellano has been chained by the wrists with two sets of handcuffs. In addition, his wrists have been connected to a chain around his waist, and his ankles have been in shackles.

     "In addition to these physical restraints, Mr. Arellano is brought to Court in an orange jumpsuit, escorted by six or ten U.S. marshalls and is guarded by several officers of the Court during his appearances."

Both lawyers insisted that "El Tigrillo" had the "right to be treated like a human being." The shackles, they argued, violated the provisions of the 6th Amendment to the Constitution (which establishes the right to fair and speedy trial) by giving the jury the impression beforehand that the defendant is a dangerous criminal.

In support of their argument, they cited legal precedent in a previous case, Spain v. Rushen, that held that a physical restraint may,  1) create prejudice by reversing the presumption of innocence;  2) affect the defendant's mental faculties;  3) prevent communication between the accused and his lawyers;   4) subtract from the dignity and decorum of the judicial process; and  5)  be painful for the defendant.

Bartick and Adams argued that the treatment given "El Tigrillo" violated not only U.S. laws, but also the Inter-American Convention on Human Rights and  U.N. Conventions governing dignified treatment of prisoners.

     "In fact, Mr. Arellano has been forced to suffer the indignity of being totally shackled in each of his Court appearances. His restraints are for no other purpose than to humiliate him. Mr. Arellano presents no risk of injury or escape. Placing him in shackles simply creates a spectacle for the media. There is no rational basis for Mr. Arellano's physical restraints other than to portray him as dangerous and guilty. It is (treatment) that is shameful to out system of justice."

The petition to remove the restraints, opposed forcefully by the prosecution, was finally denied by Judge Burns. Arellano Felix was forced to continue and finish his trial in chains. 

On April 16 of that year, in the middle of the trial, Aellano Felix's defense filed another petition before Judge Burns. The Motion asked that the the conditions of his incarceration in the San Diego Metropolitan Corrections Center (MCC-SD) be modified. "El Tigrillo" was living under conditions that his lawyers described as deplorable.  "Mr. Arellano has been confined in the MCC since his arrest. He occupies a solitary cell, located in the Special Unit, which is used for disciplinary segregation," they stated.

Titled "Motion to Modify Conditions of Confinement,"  Bartick and Adams' argument revealed the lifestyle to which the former leader of the Tijuana Cartel had been reduced. "Mr. Arellano is confined in a cell that measures 5x4 yards square, seven days a week. The cell consists of a metal bed soldered to the wall, a sink and the toilet. Three days a each week, he's allowed to leave his cell to take a bath and shave inside a cage. Mr Arellano keeps his personal hygiene articles on the floor, between the toilet and the wall."
Miguel Caro Quintero
Miguel Caro Quintero, among the worst enemies of the system
The supermaximum security prison in Florence, Colorado, is known by two names: the Alcatraz of the Rockies and Hell on Earth. It is classified as a "supermax" and it is the harshest in the U.S. penitentiary system.  Basically, it a place where Washington sends those who for some reason have made it onto its worst enemies list. The list includes some Mexican drug trafficking kingpins who are particularly hated by the U.S. government. In addition to Hector "El Guero" Palma and Francisco Javier Arellano Felix, it has housed Miguel Caro Quintero, former leader of the Sonora Cartel and the brother of Rafael Caro Quintero, accused of the murder of undercover DEA agent, Enrique "Kiki" Camarena, in 1985.

In its facilities, Caro Quintero has shared space with inmates like John Walker Lindh, the American Taliban, and Zacharias Moussaoui, mastermind of the September 9-11 attacks in 2001. Also, Theodore Kaczynski, the Unabomber;  Ahmed Ajaj, terrorist who took part in the New York City World Trade Center bombings in 1993 and Khalfan Khamis Mohammed, author of the U.S. Embassy attacks in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998.


Just before he was sentenced in 2010 to 17 years in prison, Caro Quintero asked his lawyers to save him from spending more time in Florence in the company of those people. "The manner in which Miguel has been treated is extraordinarily harsh," argued his lawyer, Walter Nash, according to the transcripts of the last minutes of his trial before Judge Phillip Brimmer, in the Colorado District Court on February 4, 2010. "My client is living under deplorable conditions," argued the lawyer. "Your Honor: I would like to discuss the conditions of this man's confinement...I'll say to the Court that I do not dispute the notion that a federal prison should not be a summer club. It cannot be, nor should it be, easy for a person to be there.  However, the way in which Caro Quintero has been treated,  in Mexico as well as in the United States, has been extraordinary. It has been incredibly harsh. Why is he being treated like this, keeping him in the company of the worst of the worst.?"

In his argument, Nash disclosed that Caro Quintero had fallen into a deep depression as a result of his isolation. The following is the description he gave of the Mexican narco's life behind bars:

"The treatment he has received, in essence, has been one of extreme isolation. He has been in solitary confinement for over eight years... he is so isolated and feels so alone that he has indicated that he doesn't care if you place him in contact with people who might represent a danger to him. He just wants to be with other human beings.

"We have shown the Court facts that illustrate the serious mental problems that may derive from keeping a person isolated from human contact.  In Mr. Caro Quintero's file, it has been shown that he has been visited by psychologists. But the visits simply consist of a person cracking open the cell door and asking in poor Spanish: 'How are you?' That said, they leave him alone and go on to the next inmate. He has never received an in-depth evaluation and nobody has seen the aftereffects that arise from keeping him in isolation," said the lawyer.

Next, he asked for a change of prisons, a transfer from the fearsome Colorado Supermax, the Alcatraz of the Rockies, to a penitentiary closer to Mexico.  "We ask that he be transferred to a prison in Arizona so he can be visited by his family."

The court documents note that Caro Quintero then took the podium:

"Your Honor -- began the narco-- I have made a mistake as a human being and I am very remorseful. Because of that, I am asking for forgiveness from everybody here and especially my family. I promise I will never make a mistake like this again. I'm asking you to let me stay with my family, with my children, to help them get ahead in life. It has been very difficult being separated from them."

--Is that all?-- asked Judge Brimmer.
--Yes, your Honor. That's all,-- replied the man from Sinaloa.

In the end, Caro Quintero was transferred to a new prison. But not in Arizona. They sent him to Memphis, Tennessee, 1,200 miles from Sonora.

Osiel Cardenas Guillen; he asks for forgiveness, but it does him no good

What the head of the Gulf Cartel requested, after learning that he would lose at his criminal trial, was for his family to accompany him. He had negotiated a deal with the United States: pay $50 million dollars in exchange for a lesser sentence. He just needed  to find out just how hard he would be hit.

The transcript from the last day of trial on February 24, 2010, shows somebody who was at one time one of the most famous narcos in Mexico in a much different light: contrite and nervous, surrounded by lawyers to hear his sentence from the lips of Judge Hilda Tagle, in the Federal (District) Court in south Texas.

The transcripts paints a picture of a defense (comprised of lawyers Roberto Yzaguirre, C.J. Quintanilla and Chip Lewis) out of options, accepting defeat. In contrast, the prosecution was visibly happy with the agreement. Especially with the $50 million.  

--Quintanilla: "Your Honor, I spoke with Miss Trevino last night  and we would ask the court if it will allow (Osiel Cardenas Guillen's) wife and daughter to be present."

--Judge: "I will allow it." (Both women enter the court room to hear the sentence).

--Judge: "Sir, do you have anything to tell the Court before being sentenced?"
--Osiel: "Yes, your Honor. For the mistakes I made, I ask for forgiveness from my country, Mexico, the United States, my family and, above all, from my wife and my children. I feel that all this time in prison I have reflected on the bad attitude I had. Truthfully, I feel remorseful. I also apologize to the people I harmed, directly or indirectly.
The Judge issues sentence
 (Brimmer:"is that all?")
--Judge: "When I sentence a 19 year old young man who, in exchange for coming to the United States illegally, agrees to carry marijuana, I take into consideration his life and the differences in his life and yours, the leader of a cartel whose family lives in relative luxury. When I sentence an 18 year old student for fraudulently purchasing a firearm destined for Mexico, I think about you, the leader of a cartel with your bodyguards...You were a role model for the younger drug traffickers who, brandishing their assault rifles, are ever more aggressive and daring.


"Your thirst for power and lack of respect for law and decency is tragic. Kidnapping, extortion, battles in the streets. A lost innocence: that's your legacy to your country and to our communities in both sides of the border. This is why I believe that the sentence I will impose on you will be such that, by the time you are set free, those drug traffickers for whom you were a role model will have forgotten you.

The judge sentenced Cardenas Guillen to 25 years. Thanks to his plea agreement, he avoided a life sentence, since he was accused of assaulting a U.S. federal agent at gunpoint in Tamaulipas. This was an offense that would have, automatically, led to him spend the rest of his life in prison. By way of farewell, the judge sent Osiel one last message:

--Judge: "Mr. Cardenas, God judges the secrets in our hearts. And God will surely judge you for the ones you have in yours. More important, He will judge you for your actions."

Cardenas kept silent.

The defense asked the Court for permission to allow Osiel to meet with his daughter and wife in private, before he was sent to a federal prison.

--Judge: "A visit here? No, absolutely not."

The agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice was not successful. Recently, he was transferred to the most feared prison in the United States, the Florence Supermax.

Vicente Zambada Niebla, sequestered and depressed 

The letter was sent to Judge Ruben Castillo, to the District Court in Chicago, on June 27, 2011. It is signed by George Santangelo, Edward Panzer and Alvin Michaelson, attorneys for Vicente Zambada Niebla, "El Vicentillo," one of the most important members of the Sinaloa Cartel.

 "Dear Judge: Please accept this letter in support of Vicente Zambada Niebla and his petition to determine why he is being held in confinement under special conditions and whether that is reasonable...Vicente has been confined to the Chicago Metropolitan Detention Center since March, 2010, in a Special Unit where he occupies four cells, one at a time, isolated from the other inmates. He sleeps in one cell for two consecutive nights and is after that required to move to one of the other three."


Santangelo, Panzer, and Michaelson recount how Zambada Niebla (whose trial was postponed until October) is prohibited from talking to other inmates and may only engage  in conversation with his lawyers and prison personnel with a rank higher than lieutenant. That is, only a few prison guards can talk to him.

His isolation, according to his lawyers, is extreme: he can make a few phone calls each month and his letters from Mexico tend to get lost or get there late. "Not even once a week is mail delivered to Vicente. In fact, he sometimes gets mail that is delayed for months. Other inmates get their mail immediately. He only gets it delivered by his lawyer, and only on Thursdays if he's available...His family sends him mail every day,  but despite that, there have been months when (mail) was not delivered."

With respect to his cells, he only has a mattress, three blankets, two sheets, a pillow and a small table. He was allowed sporadic exercise periods in a cell that measures 40 square yards., far from sunlight and without access to fresh air. Due to security concerns, he was never taken up to the prison's roof because it was feared a sniper would assassinate him to keep him from talking.

"He has not been given Vitamin D supplements (to supplement his lack of sunlight)," wrote Santangelo, Panzer and Michaelson. "Simple things, like a soft drink or a coloring pencil are prohibited," they pointed out.

Other complaints his lawyers have presented were: "Vicente's glasses broke. He hasn't been allowed to replace them," and "Vicente has made repeated requests for medical attention because he suffers from chronic stomach problems. He hasn't gotten an examination." 

"His lawyer has observed Vicente throughout his confinement. He looks more and more anxious. His face looks gray."


The lawyers argued that keeping a prisoner in extreme isolation runs the risk of developing what's known as "special unit" syndrome, whose symptoms include visual and auditory hallucinations, hypersensitivity to noise and touch, insomnia and paranoia, uncontrollable fear, temporal distortions and even risk of suicide.


The judge agreed to his transfer to another jail. Currently, he's in the Federal Corrections Center in Milan, Michigan.


In December, the lawyers wrote another letter to the judge. The situation, they said, was worse in Chicago because his cell was smaller. "His haircut was postponed for three weeks in retaliation for having complained," say his lawyers. (Victor Hugo Michel/Milenio)  

86 comments:

  1. Some of that is completely justified on the 'narcos' part, esp. Javier Francisco, the chains and shackles are dehumanizing, and not needed. What, he was going to escape in the court room? Attack the judge? And the conditions sound pretty inhumane in the Supermax, even a man in prison, sentenced to life should be able to bathe everyday.

    Imprisoning someone for the rest of their life is punishment enough, prison conditions in some of these cases are deplorable. Vicente Zambada too, that case is pretty shameful, regarding his treatment.

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    1. Who would have thought that these bad ass cartel leaders would complain about deplorable living conditions, not so tuff. After all.

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    2. Fuck these guys! Not so tuff after all eh? Maccho fkn bullshit killing innocent women and children punk ass motherfuckers crying like lil fkn bitches now. America owns ur asses now! Damn Im proud to be American.

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    3. Dont do the crime...if you cant do the time....any of us would be treated 10 times worse in a mexican prison.

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    4. America's supermax federal prisons are worse than the old nazi prisons, but hey these guys deserve worse..

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    5. Do You think he felt sorry for every person he was decapitating? No!. Now his getting a taste of what he harvest. That's why you have to think twice before messing around with the US Government. DO NOT MESS AROUND WITH THE US GOVERNMENT. PERIOD!

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    6. They're lucky they have feet to shackle. Boohoo cry for us all.

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  2. Aww call the waaaaaambulance:'(

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  3. all hard and bad towards innocent people with a little gun in their hands but now they show their true machismo.

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  4. fuck that they should have these guys shackled with 1000 pound wieghts on both legs and both arms then in thrown in a sewer cause the are scum

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  5. Man these guys are at the 4 season, compared to the prisons Mexico has....

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  6. To bad so sad, should have thought about that before shouldnt have you?

    Rot you dirty bastards! You deserve no sympathy! Always remember when cutting your wrist it is up the road not across the street... I pray that ALL narco scum if left alive are put in the very same conditions for what they have done to the beautiful peoples and country of Mexico... If Mexico implemented the death penalty for ALL criminal narco scum that would solve this problem as well... The death penalty for ALL criminal narco scum would solve so many, many problems, for Mexico to not implement it makes the government look like criminals themselves! -CHIVO

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  7. Good article chivis, do these pieces of shit,deserve better treatment, da answer is hell no!! When the felix family massacred the family south of enseneda did da felix family have any remorse? Nope! did osiel give a damn when he orderd the zetas to wipe out those innocent people in da barrio cuz he thought they were working for another rival?nope!!! Did quintero try to save the life of dea agent camerana?nope!! Has vincente showed any remorse for being part of the group that started the holocuast that has taken the life of over 100000,people?nope!!! They get what they deserve and more!!!!

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  8. double handcuffs,what a load of crap!!! Its all for show,and that isnt fair,but allowing his sicarrios to go out and do hits aint right either!
    To bad dumb ass you got caught,thats what happens when you get caught,you go to jail and suffer long and hard......what goes around comes around.

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  9. The judge should asks these drug kingpins whether they prefer to suffer the same fate as their victims - torture and death.
    Or to languish in a super-max jail.
    It would be interesting to know the answer!

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  10. This is awful treatment. All these years of this bullshit.BOO HOO ! Why dont they just kill themselves! Do you think anyone would actually claim the body? I bet their families are as good as they themselves are.

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  11. Fuck'em can't do the time, don't do the crime!

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    1. Yeah Bro! They should have jailed these huizos at the Ramsey 2 (fag unit) in Texas.

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  12. Gee, I'm wondering why I just can't get all torn up by the treatment of those that torture over and over again? Their actions were inhumane and they expect humane treatment? There was a time when they should have weighed the decision to become 'narcoed' against the consequences.

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  13. Knowing that these girlscout cheerleaders are suffering a long slow painful life somehow brings a warm smile about my face, aaahhhhhhh yes :)

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  14. @ J
    You,can't be serious. Do you not understand the shit these guys did? Maybe if prisons were worse, some of them may think twice before killing hundreds of people. Kids, women and almost all of them tortured. If they think coming to the publici is going to do anything for them, they are wrong. There is a few naive people like u, but not many that believe these guys don't deserve what they are getting, plus some.

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  15. We all make mistakes. too bad these, so called JEFES believe that they were never goin to get caught, and are the #1 Reason why Mexico is wut it is Today... but let just ask ourselfs wut it would be like in there world right now? Not even animals are treated like that...its a shame =/

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  16. If you are going to keep people in solitary confinement they at least need cable TV. Years in solitary with nothing to do drives people insane, and that is not supposed to be part of their sentence. Doesn't matter if they "deserve" it, the US prison system doesn't have the right to psychologically torture inmates.

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  17. In his argument, Nash disclosed that Caro Quintero had fallen into a deep depression as a result of his isolation. The following is the description he gave of the Mexican narco's life behind bars:

    "The treatment he has received, in essence, has been one of extreme isolation. He has been in solitary confinement for over eight years... he is so isolated and feels so alone that he has indicated that he doesn't care if you place him in contact with people who might represent a danger to him. He just wants to be with other human beings. ASK CAMARANO FAMILY HOW THEY LIVE WITHOUT HUSBAND FATHER. KIKI IS IN ISOLATION 6 FEET UNDER FOR ETERNITY THIS SCUM BAG OF THE EARTH HAS THE GULL TO COMPLAIN MAY HE RUT OR TAKEN OUT BY ANOTHER PRISONER FOR DEATH OF KIKI CAMARANO I WISH I HAD FEW MINUTES WITH THIS SCUM BAG IN HIS CELL HOTEL THAT HE IS IN DIE IN PRISON YOU SUBHUMAN

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  18. Well, I was going to say someing profound but these previous comments pretty much said it all! They didn't care about the lives of the people they either murdered or had murdered! They thought they were 'untouchable' but now look where they are! Crying for better treatment like the people they killed! TOO fu..ing bad. Ok, let's put them in jails EXACTLY like Mexico's and see how long it takes them to BEG to be put back in the US controlled jails! And yes, I do feel they need to be shackled because there is ALWAYS that chance of an attempted breakout in the courtroom or jailhouse!

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  19. ***ATTENTION BORDERLAND BEAT STAFF***

    JUST GOT WORD FROM FAMILY THIS MORNING THAT PIEDRAS NEGRAS COAHUILA HAS BEEN LOCKED DOWN & INTERNATIONAL BRIDGES INTO EAGLE PASS TEXAS ARE/WERE CLOSED. SEVERAL ROAD BLOCKADES, GATES VEHICLES ON FIRE, SHOOTOUTS AND EXPLOSIONS THROUGHOUT PIEDRAS NEGRAS COAHUILA SINCE YESTERDAY AND ERUPTED AGAIN IN DIFFERENT AREAS THIS MORNING.

    MAYBE YOU ALL CAN GET SOME MORE INFO.

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  20. What a bunch of whining fucktards. They should of thought of the consequences before being part of the drug business.

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  21. Alianza del CAF y Beltran Leyva Cartel, Rumored in san diego california

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  22. It's rather hard for me to sympathize with people that have caused a whole country to Implode..! Especially; I feel just terrible that Zambada had to wait a whole 3 weeks for a Hair Cut..? What kind of a Penal System are we running?? That should be taken up (belated haircut) by the Human Rights Commision imediately, if not sooner!!!

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  23. FUck these assholes waaaaaa waaaaa fucking crybabies

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  24. It seems to me that if you were captured by any of these men in their time, you might have found the conditions even worse than what they are complaining about now.

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  25. Thank you for the translation un vato and thank you to all of the BB reporters!-CHIVO

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  26. Wow these guys have some nerve complaining, they are just pissed because the us is not giving them cell phones and all the perks they would have gotten in the mexican prisons with paid off officials. Who really cares if they do not like the way they are treated, how about all the people that were killed and tortured beause of their actions?

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  27. Remorseful my ass. Terms of the extraditions don't allow for the death penalty, which I think is a good thing. Maybe suffering through years of not having a soft drink or a speedy haircut is a more appropriate punishment. Pendejos.

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  28. I've had negative sentiments toward this too and then just a moment ago a new thought came to mind:

    "What would any of them do with their lives were they to be set free again?" How many of them would return to crime? How many of them would KILL AGAIN AND AGAIN?"

    Freedom wise, we all know what it's like to have to wait for something of an appointment to see a doctor in a hospital, soon enough you start to go crazy and would like to make a Quick Exit and so I'M SOME GLAD I HAVE MY FREEDOM!!! Crime does not pay.

    R. Scooter

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  29. Wtf did they think prison was rainbows and butterflies maybe they should have thought about this before they became criminals and kingpins. This is the life they chose now they must deal with it

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  30. COME ON NOW,HANDS UP,WHO FEELS SORRY FOR THEM?
    ANYONE ? That's what i thought,and here was everyone thinking they were tough guys.

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  31. Good on you USA.Show the world what imprisonment should mean.Don't listen to bullshit legal arguments and technicalities.The only reason we still hearing about these bitches is because they got the money to fuck everyone around.
    "El Tigrillo"give me a fuckin break!

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  32. "Man these guys are at the 4 season, compared to the prisons Mexico has"
    Boolshit,why do you think they want to stay in Mexican prisons?You aint got a clue.These old farts would be living high and mighty in Mexican jugs,anything they wanted would be brought in for them.Are you kidding?USA Supermax,no human contact V Mexican jail time,association all day every day ?
    You are fuckin jokin,there is no such thing as"no human contact in Mexican jug"I know where i would rather go.Prison is prison,you gotta watch your ass anywhere,and never be a pussy bitch.No human contact will send you straight up fucked up.Fuck em,they grown men knew what they were in.We all know what happens.

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  33. Ask the headless victim if Lil. Vicente treatment is to harsh. That motherfucker wanted to blow up buildings f*&k him.

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  34. J said...
    "Some of that is completely justified on the 'narcos' part, esp. Javier Francisco, the chains and shackles are dehumanizing"
    LOOK AT THAT SHIT ?
    A complete load of pussy bullshit.The damage these dudes did,the murders they ordered and you worrying about chains?Are you fuckin cracked or what.Man,i guess this is one of those soft ass clowns who shout about serial killer human rights.
    Maybe we should buy him a suit,get his nails done,take those dehumanizing chains off.ARE YOU FOR FUCKIN REAL?WE GOT HARDER WOMEN THAN YOU.
    FUCK HIM,AND THE YACHT HE WAS SAILIN IN.

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  35. "call the waaaaaambulance:'("

    -that is the funniest shit ever! All these putos who get caught will end up calling as well.

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  36. "And the conditions sound pretty inhumane in the Supermax, even a man in prison, sentenced to life should be able to bathe everyday"
    ARE YOU FUCKIN JOKING ?ARE YOU BEING SARCASTIC?
    I HOPE SO,IF NOT,YOU ONE SAD CASE OF A MAN.
    Or some kind of pussy hero worship?Or is it about the US?I just can't believe you saying the shit you saying,unbelievable.People,dont you love em.

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  37. Fck these pussy's they killed n torture ppl n know there crying for this lmao, lock dem up with no lights n throw da keys away....

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  38. DRUG TRAFFICKERS WHO HAVE KILLED OR HARMED OTHERS SHOULD NOT BELONG IN MEXICO OR USA. MEXICO AND USA SHOULD ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH RUSSIA TO INCARCERATE THESE SOBS IN RUSSIA PRISONS TO WORK HARD LABOR. SITTING IN A CELL DOES NO GOOD TO NO ONE. THE PRISONER SHOULD WORK HARD FOR THE SHIT HE DID TO OTHER PEOPLE.

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  39. I couldn't help but laugh while reading this.

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  40. El Taliban has been caught :-O http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-19740090

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  41. Choices = Consequences

    I don't recall the Geneva Conventions mentioning color pencils and haircuts. That cry baby pussy should be grateful he even has a head on which to grow hair, a problem many of his victims are no longer burdened with. Somebody give him a ginger ale for his upset tum-tum and put him back in a dark hole.

    As for the chains/cuffs at trial I do agree that it can influence a trial/jury and shouldn't be done to anybody. But after they are sentenced I could care less what they do with them. Colorado Super Max is no joke and the 23&1/2 hours a day in solitary confinement for years on end will fuck up even the hardest guys. But even that is a holiday compared to what their victims and their families have suffered.

    el 520

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  42. Guantanamo bay is still open if these guys want something more tropical

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  43. Aguantense culebras! No muy bravos y firmes? Como con gente indefensa no tienen compasion. El corrido no se acava con la captura de los capos, ta sige pero no dicen como lloran y le hacen de sentidas. Golosaz

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  44. Wow! I'm shocked and amazed how some ass clowns on here actually sympathize with these examples of human waste! Combined..these turds are responsible for an unmeasured amount of death and misery...all in the name of power and greed! Once convicted these guys deserve nothing less than death! We all know their crimes there is no dispute here...these are not innocent (scapegoats) men! They chose to rape, pillage, and murder their fellow man! Fuck'em!

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  45. There are regulations and rules to prison, I didn't write them, we should all be grateful that those who cry for blood on here didn't either. They were convicted or plead guilty, and that's it, but to deprive people of sanitary conditions, basic decency, I don't agree with that. So, because El Tigrillo was a cartel leader (in name only) he shouldn't be allowed to bathe daily? I don't agree with that. Doesn't have to be a club fed sort of situation, but a cell for the rest of your life in punishment enough, in my mind. I don't like the fact that they pick and choose who is 'bad' enough' to be subjected to supermax.

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  46. Finally an article that makes me smile:)

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    1. You are not the only one, I've been laughing since yesterday!

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  47. To make my happiness complete I wish these narco scumbags could read these postings relating what the outside world is thinking about them.

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  48. Sending them to Mexican prisons would enable them to buy their freedom and/or tunnel out.

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  49. All maximum security prisons in new york state allow each inmate to shower 3 times a week. So that is not unusual punishment. The real story is that only a few are punished like this. It is only the very top bosses, the ones that got all the publicity that the US buries in the supermaxes. Those are the worst prisons. No punishment is harder than solitary. Ask any criminal that has been in prison what was the worst part, and they will tell you its the bordom. But most of the big narcos dont go to these prisons. They get busted, pay a few millions in fines and take plea deal and 20 years in medium or minimum security federal prison. Where they can buy whatever they want, cell phone, laptop, porn , some places sex, and yes this is US federal prison I am refering too. For 2000$ you can buy a cell phone. To some that is way to much, to narcos that have millions that is nothing. It is only the ones that had a lot of public exposure that the US sends to supermax for the press, but most do not have it bad.Most plead out to 20 years drug trafficking, and do there time in medium and minimum security.

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  50. What the Hell are the crying about?* this assholes had so many people killed because of there greed.. there no celebreties.. shit they should put them in general population.. or even better send them to tent city in phoenix, az.. with Arpaio.. so they can wear pink boxers..

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  51. Quintero didnt kill camarena.godinez didnt either.

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  52. Im surprised Osiel hasn't die yet without his daily dose of coke from the supermax doctors..

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  53. I've seen stuff in porn films they should use on those guys. They can be forgiven, but that does not mean they should not be punished. Punishment is not just the lack of freedom, it is meant to avenge wrongs. Maybe they should be have to share their cells with alligators and scorpions. There could be so much worse. chingalos

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  54. look...i know you feel motivated to express your anger, that is fine, even disagree with whoever, again that is fine, throw in a f bomb well ok if you must...

    but anything comming in that attacks J or anyone else in a vile way will not get in, and i am sure i speak for all 3 moderators. watch the adjectives. speak your mind but look and ask yourself "will this possibly get in?" if you want to be heard just be careful about personal attacks. thanks..

    that said..I have written a rebuttal of sorts showing the conditions that two americans are living in, in a mexican prison. BTW bathing? about every 2 weeks because water is rationed and only given with the one meal a day...too bad Mexico is so corrupt because it would be justice to see these capos live in those conditions. however as it is, they can buy their way into comfort and just about everything they desire.....Paz, Chivis

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    1. If J can't take the criticism maybe he should just REPORT the news and not COMMENT on it!

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  55. Pobre vicentito, it does not compare to his house in Bosques de las Lomas in DF!!!

    Perhaps barry hussain obama soetoro, the President Pu$$y & his negro scumbag AG, eric holder, who allowed your cartels to obtain arms, will help you scumbag killer destroyers of the Mexico that used to be after barry hussain gets re-elected.

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  56. These guys only getting 25 year sentences for the horrible crimes they have ordered in mass. Their getting off easy.

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  57. To all the individuals talking about the hell wth them,take that and some, and all that other stuff, they suppose to be the bad guys right?....and the rest of us rae suppose to be good guys, law abidding citizens<angels of the lord himself and all that good stuff I suppose?...If one wants another to have done what everyone knows is wrong or inhumane or what not...maybe have them spill a little blood or have them stop breathing or are rooting for this to happen to them...whats the difference between a law breaking bad guy and somebody that sees them self as a law abidding (though they pick and chose the law abidding part and root for others to break that law abiddingness?Does the constitution not say a law for all?Either every human being is treated equally and humanlly,or the word, subject and expectations of humane should cease to exist.

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    1. Thank you 9:32 pst . All these tough guys talking torture and inhumanity have never felt the true cold cold side of the world. It's easy to judge men when you have never left the suburbs. Compassion is a lost art. -el blanco guy

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  58. Prisons in Mexico are very different, inmates can run a store, cook food, see women and their families and basically have some freedom to move around.

    Should be noted how corrupt the DEA and prosecutors offices are by taking 50 million bribes in exchange for deals.

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  59. Send them to guantanamo bay so they can try the daily special....the c*** meat sandwich haha

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  60. For the ones who complain about the isolation...just give them a soccer ball so they have somebody to talk to.

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  61. "Either every human being is treated equally and humanlly,or the word, subject and expectations of humane should cease to exist"
    Idiotic idealistic bullshit,it is patently obvious we do not all love one another and there is nothing wrong with that?We are human beings and all differing morality's,but,we must have laws that can prevent us from going even further down the path to utter anarchy and violence.With sentiments like yours the murder rate would skyrocket,believe me.A lot of what you said is incomprehensible?Are you saying one law for every crime?

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  62. This story made me lmmfao. if u give these pieces of shit n inch they will take a mile, the only thing they want is to be put in a better situation to bribe somebody manipulate sum inmates into doing there shit n making it as cumfy as posible like they would in mx fuck them let them rott in isolation. i use to think z40 n chapo n the rest of the cartels deserve death but i like this torture by isolation. I LOVE AMERICA
    FAH-Q

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  63. whats with the mask?.

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  64. @September 27, 2012 6:32 AM
    Amen! Couldn't have said it better!

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  65. ATODOS LOS NARCOS PRESOS OJALA Y LEAN ESTO QUE CREIAN QUE LOS LLEVABAN DE VACASIONES A UN RETIRO ESPIRITUAL AL PARKE NO ACASTIGARLOS Y DESEN POR BIEN SERVIDOS QUE NO CALLERON ENLAS MANOS DE LOSCONTRAS!!!

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  66. It's fucked up knowing you went to jail for selling drugs when drugs shouldn't be illigal in the first place. prohibition created the situation they are in. They are just factors created by the U.S. its like they breed the criminal. Take him to the top nd then jail them and present them as trophies. It keeps the DEA and judges and prison kingpins with their pockets full nd with a job nd it keeps the U.S feeling like they are so great but no. Your not great. Your just a big scammer who manufactures terrorism. The U.S pays for it

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  67. "Thank you 9:32 pst . All these tough guys talking torture and inhumanity have never felt the true cold cold side of the world. It's easy to judge men when you have never left the suburbs. Compassion is a lost art. -el blanco guy"
    Speak for yourself brother,i know about jail.I know about violence,i know about other things?
    Don't think every one here is some suburban boy.
    I am one of the ones who,fuck it nuff said.

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  68. The big-mouth that say's that US special ops can't put and end to mexico's drug issue,dream on !! Having been on a tier 1 team and took-out alot of bigger fish than "wet backs"
    End of conversation !!
    Herman Snerd

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  69. I understand these men committed crimes and should be punished but if our justice system treats prisoners in such inhumane conditions our judicial system is no different than the criminal acts themselves. People thinking this treatment is acceptable might feel differently if it was one of your family in these circumstances.

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  70. This is reality of extradition that's what these narcos fear the most falling into the hands of u.s. In Mexico prisons they get to live like kings. Its inhumane the way they are treated.. For the most part no human should be treated like this. Wanting better living conditions don't make em less of a man.

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  71. I wonder if they truly are Sorry for what they did or if they would go back to their old ways.

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  72. They should be punished but like every other mafioso like gotti or italian mob bosses not get treated worser than these sand nigger terrorist in guantanamo bay now thats just making an example out of these mexican narcos

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