Friday, March 18, 2011

Arizona family attacked in Juarez; Two dead

 An Arizona family was gunned down in Juarez Thursday evening during a family reunion, leaving two people dead and others wounded.

Five family members were at a reunion at a home located at Rosales and Madera St. in the Colonia Anahuac when gunmen opened fire. 26-year-old Josue Reyes Castro and 36-year-old Miguel Angel Martinez Varela were taken to a clinic in northern Juarez where they later died.

Two other people, an unidentified male and a four year old girl, were also injured in the attack, but there was no word on the severity of their injuries.

Minutes after the attack, elements of the Federal Police engaged in a gunbattle with the alleged perpetrators which lead to the arrest of two men and the death of another.

Juarez police recovered 130 bullets at the crime scene. Reports said the bullets belonged to two different calibers, possibly a 9mm and a 7.52x39mm. Police also seized a white 2002 Ford Expedition with Juarez license plates, and a red 2000 Dodge Durango with Arizona license plates, and a blue 1997 Honda Accord.

Sources: El Universal, El Siglo de Torreon, Puente Libre

14 comments:

  1. Wonder if it was mistaken identify, or intentional, and whether this escalation of violence is strategy or loss of control, madness and chaos?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Seems to be a lot of "mistaken identity" in Mexico these days.

    ReplyDelete
  3. What it is is a bunch of wicked people doing wicked things.......all of this senseless violence is ultimately gonna be the downfall of these cartels.....there all just dead men walking

    ReplyDelete
  4. federal police get into a shootout with the shooters,then obviously it was juarez cartel continuing to take out members of the sinaloa cartel,thats why the federal police intervened.sinaloa cartel,so much talk but just cant win chihuahua plaza!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Here's an idea people........stay the fuck away from Juarez! Family or no family, why would you step foot in Juarez right now.
    Are there still people who do not know what the hell is going on there?
    For fucks sake!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I agree what the fuck. Send the family a card and tell them you'll see them in 10 years when the war is over.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is sad. One of the reasons I don't go to mexico anymore because of the kind of incidents. Mistaken identity. I don't know if the war will be over in 10 years,maybe 20 years.

    ReplyDelete
  8. You have to question the judgement of anyone wanting to go to Juarez at the moment, a family reunion is no reason to put yourself in harms way,even if you had to go anyone with a brain would arrange the meeting in a safer area of mexico and make the thing a holiday for all.

    Maybe they were there for different reasons, who knows.
    But for whatever reason, they are dead.

    On another note, none of these cartel top dogs will escape early death or imprisonment, 20 years ago people were saying Pablo Escobar was untouchable and could not be stopped.
    The only things that have created such powerful cartels are 1. massive corruption in mexico, and 2 the USA's appitite for drugs that the government class as illigal.

    Nothing will change in the US, and any help provided by the US government always comes with plenty of big thick strings attached.
    This fight is for mexico and mexico alone.

    One thing that is for sure is that the demand for and flow of drugs will not stop.

    Maybe the best thing for mexico is that their government do not involve themselves in stopping the flow of drugs and just let the US deal with it.

    i would not let my children die so as just to provide the party entertainment for my rich neighbors, that would be crazy, but that is exactly what Mexico is doing.

    And also after all the help(30+years) and billions of dollers sent to colombia, it is just as easy as it ever was to find colombian cocain in just about every town and city in the western world.

    So that was all worth the effort and expense, all those thousands of innocent women and children killed over the years must be so thankfull that they gave their lives so america can fill its prisons with people who take drugs.
    Can anyone here think of a more noble and wonderful cause to die for?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Let's look at a couple of facts here. Nothing in the article says anything about "mistaken identity". That line of thinking comes only from the comments here.

    It will be interesting to see how this plays out. Just because they were at a family reunion does not mean they or their relatives were not involved in the drug trade somehow.

    It strikes me that there will be some kind of link somewhere, or maybe this was an accident - which reinforces the comments about why would people even think of heading to Juarez with all that is going on. That would be like going on a picnic in Baghdad and being surprised when violence happens.

    As for 4:04 am's comments, the remarks about Colombia are way off. The Colombian cartels are virtually wiped out - ask any Colombiano just how much things have improved in the last decade.

    Mexico is now the frontline. Colombia, Honduras, Guatemala...these countries are the manufacturers wholesaling to Mexico because it is a lot easier to get the drugs in overland than by ship or plane, with much less chance of getting caught.

    Also 4:04 am, you are saying to just let the drugs flow into the US? That is retarded thinking and part of why things are such a mess. Decades of this type of thinking under the PRI is what created this monster in the first place.

    You have to stand up for what is right, not just for protecting your own ass. This selfishness is what has got Mexico into this mess.

    ReplyDelete
  10. @ 2:03

    How nice for you to say i am way off when you did not even read the post properly.

    Where did i say anything about modern colombian cartels?
    The cartels are gone and FARC control most of the colombian cocain trade.....nice change then?

    My statement was that you could get colombian cocaine as easily as ever.....nothing has changed.

    Frontline? you would be well lost long before you ever fiquered out where any frontline is.

    Let the drugs flow into the US?...where did i say that?
    The US could try to stop the drugs at their own border and all freedom for them to do it and i would wish them luck and success.
    But no, better that thousands of people die in a war that is not of their making for drugs they do not take in countries that are poor.

    Stand up for what is right? easy for you to say from your ivory tower.

    Maybe you should learn something of the world before you accuse others or retarded thinking.

    What got mexico into trouble is corrupt politicians, nothing else.

    If you feel like picking this post apart also please read it properly before you respond.

    Many thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  11. @March 19, 2011 2:03 PM

    "The Colombian cartels are virtually wiped out - ask any Colombiano just how much things have improved in the last decade."

    Do you even know what you are talking about? Tell me something why is Colombia is more violent then Mexico if things have "improved" during the last decade. All that change was the power shift from the Pablo to the FARC. Nothing has changed!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. The switch has not been from 'Pablo to the FARC', Anonymous 7:10pm, as you said it was. See below...
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    New armed drug-trafficking groups menace Colombia
    Sept 20110 BBC News

    Colombia's police and army have long struggled to combat the drug trade

    Armed groups of drug-traffickers have overtaken left-wing rebels as Colombia's main source of violence, local think tank Indepaz says.

    The groups have emerged since the demobilisation of the illegal United Self Defence Forces of Colombia (AUC) paramilitaries.

    The think tank says they are present in 29 of Colombia's 32 provinces....

    report continues at ...

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-11274221

    ReplyDelete
  13. @ Ardent
    No it went from pablo to the cali cartel, then it split into many pieces and farc have major power over the raw product.

    That BBC report was old news when it was released.
    The AUC have been heavily involved for many years.

    ReplyDelete
  14. pay backs a bitch

    ReplyDelete

Comments are moderated, refer to policy for more information.
Envía fotos, vídeos, notas, enlaces o información
Todo 100% Anónimo;

borderlandbeat@gmail.com